4D Space

Belfegor

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I'm currently reading Michio Kaku's Hyperspace, and was quite interested to read about 4-dimensional space. I looked it up on the 'net, and found this pretty cool example of a rotating 4-D hypercube, as we would see it in our 3-D space:

http://www.mathematik.com/4DCube/4DCubePovray.html

This model actually resonates with a few 'experiences' I've had - I would be interested to hear if anybody else has had 'visions' of similar things during altered states (whatever the trigger)?

Peace and Respect
Greg
 

naSTEe

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Looks similar to strange effect best described here ..

http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewt ... highlight=

Ugh, that panicky feeling of everything crowding in on you/standing still in a hurricane/close things turning into huge, faraway things and back

maybe when we are in a Hypnagogic state we can perceive the edges of other *co existent dimensions .. i heard that if a 1D (one dimensional) being observed a ball roll across its "world" it would see only a line which would widen on approach and then diminish to nothing, a 2D being would see a a dot that gradualy would blot out the sky then again shrink to nothing, where as we would see a rolling ball, there was no mention of how a 4D or indeed a 5D being would view a 3D ball though ????

* assuming we live in five-dimensional spacetime ("anti­de Sitter")
 

WhistlingJack

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naSTEe said:
i heard that if a 1D (one dimensional) being observed a ball roll across its "world" it would see only a line which would widen on approach and then diminish to nothing, a 2D being would see a a dot that gradualy would blot out the sky then again shrink to nothing, where as we would see a rolling ball, there was no mention of how a 4D or indeed a 5D being would view a 3D ball though ????

Edwin Abbott's 'Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions'? - http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/201
 

OneWingedBird

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Great animation.

Do they still call them tesseracts? They were such a staple of 70s pulp sci-fi :D
 

ramonmercado

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First Rendering Of A 4-Dimensional Object

Unveiling Of First Rendering Of A 4-Dimensional Object Set For 21 October

The sculpture measures about six feet in every direction and is mounted on a granite base about three feet high. See larger photo.
University Park PA (SPX) Oct 19, 2005
The Penn State Department of Mathematics will host an open house of its extensively renovated McAllister Building, featuring a dedication ceremony for a unique sculpture with deep mathematical significance on 21 October 2005 at the Penn State University Park campus.
The event will begin at 3:30 p.m. with a ceremony to dedicate the "Octacube" sculpture in the first-floor atrium of McAllister Building, followed by an opportunity for participants to explore the renovated building until 5:00 p.m.

No good rendering of any 4-dimensional object existed anywhere in the world before the Octacube, either in solid or virtual form, according to Adrian Ocneanu, the Penn State professor of mathematicians who designed the sculpture.

In addition to the events on 21 October, the mathematics department will host a mathematical talk on 20 October at 4:00 p.m. and a talk for the general public on 26 October at 6:00 p.m. All three events will take place in the atrium near the sculpture, will feature 4-dimensional movies, and will be open to the public at no charge.

The sculpture is a gift from Jill Grashof Anderson, a mathematics alumna of Penn State as a memorial for her husband, Kermit C. Anderson, also a Penn State mathematics graduate, who was killed in the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City on 11 September 2001.

The dedication ceremony for the sculpture will include an explanation of its mathematical meaning by its designer, Adrian Ocneanu, professor of mathematics. The stainless-steel Octacube is a striking object of visual art and also a mental portal to the fourth dimension, a teaching tool, and a research object bringing together many branches of mathematics and physics connected to the structure of symmetry.

The sculpture, which measures about six feet in every direction, presents the three-dimensional "shadow" of a four-dimensional solid object.

"Although mathematicians can work with a fourth dimension abstractly by adding a fourth coordinate to the three that we use to describe a point in space, a fourth spatial dimension is difficult to visualize," Ocneanu explains. "The sculpture was designed with a new method which captures four dimensional symmetry better than anything done before."

The Octacube was produced by the staff of the Engineering Services Shop, managed by Jerry Anderson. "It is rare that we get a chance to produce something so extraordinary for people to enjoy," Jerry Anderson says.

"The Octacube demonstrates the high level of skill and craftsmanship of the Penn State people who transformed it from a design to an object, including Janet Page, James Kustenborder, Ronald Weaver, Brian Bennett, Dennis Praskovich, Thomas Coakley, Thomas Rimmey and Lee Brooks."

Jill Grashof Anderson says she hopes the sculpture will encourage students, faculty, administrators, alumnae, and friends to ponder and appreciate the world of mathematics.

"I also hope that all who view the sculpture will begin to grasp the sobering fact that everyone is vulnerable to something terrible happening to them and that we all must learn to live one day at a time, making the very best of what has been given to us." She adds, "It would be great if everyone who views the Octacube walks away with the feeling that being kind to others is a good way to live."


http://www.spacedaily.com/news/time-05j.html
 

pintquaff

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Erm :oops: me no understand, whats this 4dimension i saw the rotating cube thing but i no see a 4dimension
 

ramonmercado

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pint

Erm me no understand, whats this 4dimension i saw the rotating cube thing but i no see a 4dimension

pintquaff

drink a pint of whisky and look again. :twisted:
 

bazizmaduno

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what happened to the 'tesseract' that was on display in france? (louvre?)

that was a 3d representation of a 4d object - a 4d 'cube' i think

i seem to remember that here was a description of how to construct a 'tesseract'' in a sci-fi story; it was made from matchsticks and blu-tac/chewing gum by following the written instructions

anyone help out here?
 

Graylien

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Bruce Marcot (who seems to be an expert in owls rather than maths) thinks that it would be quite possible for four dimensional beings to walk through walls in our 3-D world. Is he right when he says " the mathematics... confirm this would be entirely correct"?
I've long enjoyed mathematics and geometry, particularly higher-dimensional math. Since high school I've cultivated the ability to picture 4-dimensional geometric objects and to see them rotating in 4-D space... And this intuition also invaded some of my dreams -- typically very vivid, and a few lucid. And very weird.

I recall one dream many years ago (and another very similar one more recently) in which I was able to twist my body through a 4th-dimensional axis and slide through a 4th spatial dimension, appearing to float through walls. Actually, the mathematics -- simple 4-dimensional Euclidean extrapolations of 3-space geometry -- confirm that this would be entirely correct.

Just as one can "enter" a 2-dimensional square drawn on a paper, by "floating" down into it from above in 3-space, without crossing any of the edges, one could theoretically enter a 3-dimensional cube such as a room in a building by sliding into it from 4-space, without crossing or breaking any of the walls (or floor or ceiling).

And so in this dream I was able to spy on people and slide from room to room of this building by edging along in some misty and shadowy 4-space. I've had a couple other dreams like this since, each time being able to transport myself as if along another, unseen axis of (4-)space. And no, it definitely does not feel like the flying dreams or "astral projection" or out-of-body experiences.

source
 

Jack_Ramirez

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i used to play 'kingpin life of crime' on the pc a lot, and there was a cheat called noclip which allowed your character to float through walls floors and ceilings via an orange coloured 'fourth dimension'
.....
 

GreenJeanz1

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Jack_Ramirez said:
i used to play 'kingpin life of crime' on the pc a lot, and there was a cheat called noclip which allowed your character to float through walls floors and ceilings via an orange coloured 'fourth dimension'
.....

That's a typical first-person-shooter cheat. "Clipping" is a term for where 3D objects pass into or through each other, and can sometimes be found as an unintentional error in some games, usually with scenery(especially plants and trees in older games).
 

ramonmercado

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Notes on the Fourth Dimension
Hyperspace, ghosts, and colourful cubes – Jon Crabb on the work of Charles Howard Hinton and the cultural history of higher dimensions.


Men of broader intellect know that there is no sharp distinction betwixt the real and the unreal… – H.P. Lovecraft, The Tomb (1917)

La Belle Époque, a beautiful term for a Beautiful Age, as Light and Understanding replace Fear and Superstition, and Science and Art join hands in unholy matrimony and set out to discover the world anew. Trains become underground worms burrowing through the city, displacing medieval graves in the name of modernity; the Aéro-club de France send men into the heavens, amazing the public; Muybridge proves horses flytoo and wins a bet; Edison floods the world with light; biologists discover germs and defy Death; botanists grow tropical plants in Parisian glass-houses and affront Nature with hot-house orchids; the phonograph and the cinema fold Time and Space for the masses. And for some reason bicycles become rather popular. The world was getting smaller every day and the discoveries were getting bigger every week. How very diverting it all was…

In the land of Sona-Nyl there is neither time nor space, neither suffering nor death. – H.P. Lovecraft, The White Ship (1920)

During the period we now call the fin-de-siècle, worlds collided. Ideas were being killed off as much as being born. And in a sort of Hegelian logic of thesis/antithesis/synthesis, the most interesting ones arose as the offspring of wildly different parents. In particular, the last gasp of Victorian spiritualityinfused cutting-edge science with a certain sense of old-school mysticism. Theosophy was all the rage; Huysmans dragged Satan into modern Paris; and eccentric poets and scholars met in the British Museum Reading Room under the aegis of the Golden Dawn for a cup of tea and a spot of demonology. As a result of all this, certain commonly-accepted scientific terms we use today came out of quite weird and wonderful ideas being developed at the turn of the century. Such is the case with space, which fascinated mathematicians, philosophers, and artists with its unfathomable possibilities.

Outside of sheltered mathematical circles, the trend began rather innocuously in 1884, when Edwin A. Abbott published the satirical novella Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions under the pseudonym A. Square. In the fine tradition of English satire, he creates an alternative world as a sort of nonsense arena to lampoon the social structures of Victorian England. In this two-dimensional world, different classes are made up of different polygons, and the laws concerning sides and angles that maintain that hierarchy are pushed to absurd proportions. Initially, the work was only moderately popular, but it introduced thought experiments on how to visualise higher dimensions to the general public. It also paved the ground for a much more esoteric thinker who would have much more far-reaching effects with his own mystical brand of higher mathematics. ...

http://publicdomainreview.org/2015/10/28/notes-on-the-fourth-dimension/
 

flannel

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The website in post #16 above states the theory of relativity rules out the 4th dimension. Does anyone know if this is truly the case?
 
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