A Good Read: Your Book Suggestions

TangletwigsDeux

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Lol at the above post.

yes I've recent read some of his stuff. Ok as entertainment, I would not take it seriously though.

I'm currently reading "Cunning folk" by Adam Neville.



British set folk horror affair according to Goodreads. It's my first book of his , only a few chapters in and I'm gripped.
I saw this on your Goodreads profile (sorry not stalking honest) and it sounded very interesting so grabbed a copy to have a go at.
I dont think I'd be a very good "friend" on goodreads unless you like cosy mysteries and urban fantasy (hate that term), and I never review anything. Im basically useless on there. But let me know if you think otherwise...

Me goodreads package
 

Coal

The Ultimate Skepticus
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For those interested in perception, conscious and otherwise, I recommend the very readable "Consciousness and the Brain" by Stanislas Dehaene. There’s much of interest to those Forteans who ponder how we perceive what we think we perceive and how the brain can be misled.
 

TangletwigsDeux

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For those interested in perception, conscious and otherwise, I recommend the very readable "Consciousness and the Brain" by Stanislas Dehaene. There’s much of interest to those Forteans who ponder how we perceive what we think we perceive and how the brain can be misled.
This is a great book
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell with yesterday's knickers
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Looking for my copy of 'Time Storms' by Jenny Randles, some great reports included, love anything by Jenny Randles!
Read this once, ages ago and loved it. Now think it's time I got myself a new copy (can't for the life of me remember what I did with my original one, unless it fell through a wormhole into your collection, @Ronnie Jersey).
 

SimonBurchell

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Colette shires who’s there a true story of a leeds haunting very good and scary
Yes, I have that, it is narrated in a fairly matter-of-fact style and comes across as genuine, really quite creepy. I also recommend it if you are interested in real-life hauntings. Don't expect it to be all neatly wrapped-up at the end though, there's no real explanation for why the events occurred (which makes it more believable in a way), although it may have been down to a haunted object that came into the family's possession. A good read.
 

AmStramGram

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I am currently reading (in French) "Voyager dans l'Invisible", by Charles Stepanoff, and it's really good ! I hope they'll publish an English translation soon enough. Translated into English, the title would be "Travelling into the Invisible : shamanistic techniques of the imagination".

Charles Stepanoff is a French ethnologist who spent years among Siberian and Mongolian tribes, studying shamanism. His book attempts to reconsider our western perspectives on shamanism, providing new theories about the phenomenon.

Stepanoff's work is dense and exciting. It starts with an almost philosophical reflexion, questioning our definition of "imagination" as the antagonist of "reality", showing how this now prevailing dichotomy was actually an exception in history (we owe the Greeks for that long lived bias), and how steppic and siberian cultures used to envision what we call "imagination" as an essential part of reality.

Hunter gatherers had to rely on imagination to survive in the real world : they had to imagine what their preys thought or hoped in order to catch them. So in a way, for these traditional cultures, it was a kind of 6th sense on par with the others. And case in point : if imagination was simply a kind of (harmful) irrealistic delusion, the evolutionary process would have got rid of it long ago. It didn't, although we evolved towards more "guided" imaginative processes (such as books and movies instead of dreams, meditative contemplation and childhood "imaginary friends" [by the way, the author describes the case of a shaman who started his career because he was seeing a purple "imaginary friend" coming out of the walls of his school !]).

Shamanism probably grew out of this pragmatic view of "imagination" (which includes empathy, planning, and strategy, e.g. seeing the possible futures) our Western rationalism did depreciate. In contrast with our modern despise towards imagination, Shamans may have been valued members of human societies from Prehistory onwards, which may explain why lots of the earliest prehistoric burials seem to focus on abnormal individuals (people with various malformations) who may have been shamans, or considered to be shamans [current shamans are often "recognized" through their unusual features].

Stepanoff distantiates himself from the 20th century interpretations of shamanism. Although aknowledging Mircea Eliades groundbreaking work in the area, he utterly destroys his association of shamanism with the search of transe and extatic experiences. Actual groundwork shows that shaman rarely reach truly extatic states. What they do is more involved with an active (and somewhat trained) use of imagination and visualisation, with an element of unpredictability and randomness.

The books then proceeds delving into case studies and developing the author's approach of shamanism as seen through the eyes of the shamans themselves.

I haven't finished it yet, but it seems to be an excellent piece of work, overall. The pace of the author is a bit fast. He launches tons of ideas without always taking time to develop them fully, which is sometimes terribly frustrating. If you want to go deeper, you're left with his sources, which I find a bit dry.


Some insights of this book may proove handy on "fortean" topics. In terms of religious studies, for instance, I can already see some interesting links to explore between shamanism and various "techniques" common in Asian religions such as Taoism, Vajrayana Buddhism, or Pure Land Buddhism. Some anecdotic facts seem to point out at common roots between shamanism and these systems. Nothing new, you may say, as plenty of researchers have already claimed that taoism had shamanistic roots. But this books provides with additional elements strengthening this case.

An exemple which especially struck me was that Stepanoff has collected lots of testimonies saying that Siberian animists believe that the Shamans have a different skeleton : they either have additional bones, or bones who have a different colour than ordinary bones.

If you have read the 4th century Baopuzi Neipian, Ge Hong's treatise on taoist immortals, you'll immediately notice the similarity with the Chinese claim that you must have "immortal bones" to become an immortal / fairy ("xianren", in Chinese).

Other fortean topics with possibe indirect links with the topic of this book (shamanism & imagination) : fairies, ghosts and spirits, mediumnism.

So if you read French, go for it. If you don't, hope for an English translation in the coming years.
 

JahaRa

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Any thing by Jim Butcher. Also, I like the Jaques Vallee writes.
 

Ronnie Jersey

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If you ladies are looking for a good mystery, Mabel Seeley's 'The Listening House' is incomparable!
A young woman finds a small apartment in an old mansion that has been turned into a rooming house.
Complete with a strange older woman who owns the mansion, and some questionable tenants.
It's from 1938, but they have recent paperbacks.
One of the best, even has a surprise ending!

1657220330544.png
 
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FunkyTT

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I saw this on your Goodreads profile (sorry not stalking honest) and it sounded very interesting so grabbed a copy to have a go at.
I dont think I'd be a very good "friend" on goodreads unless you like cosy mysteries and urban fantasy (hate that term), and I never review anything. Im basically useless on there. But let me know if you think otherwise...

Me goodreads package


I've added you, I read allsorts of genres. The surgeon sounds interesting, I have heard it talked about on there before. My own past couple of reviews on there have been woeful, just a quick " this is good", as there's nothing to add that's not already been said by the Pro reviewer types. It is a great place for good recs , as is here. Id of never heard of any of these new school folk horror writers of it wasn't for Goodreads.

I finished Cunning Folk , a real page turner! I was suggested "Winterset Hollow" which happened to be free on my kindle subscription , will be starting that one this eve.

Sounds a wild ride.... Like a trippy murderous wind in the willows. It's got many 5* rave reviews.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/58934632-winterset-hollow
 

TangletwigsDeux

Abominable Snowman
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I've added you, I reabut I willd allsorts of genres. The surgeon sounds interesting, I have heard it talked about on there before. My own past couple of reviews on there have been woeful, just a quick " this is good", as there's nothing to add that's not already been said by the Pro reviewer types. It is a great place for good recs , as is here. Id of never heard of any of these new school folk horror writers of it wasn't for Goodreads.

I finished Cunning Folk , a real page turner! I was suggested "Winterset Hollow" which happened to be free on my kindle subscription , will be starting that one this eve.

Sounds a wild ride.... Like a trippy murderous wind in the willows. It's got many 5* rave reviews.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/58934632-winterset-hollow
Yeah i confess i started the Surgeon because of the tv show based on the series. However it has a much grittier feel and the characters are totally different - the coroner Isles doesn't feature in book 1. Afraid its heading into DNF territory which I always hate to do,but I will push on.
 

Spudrick68

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I said on another thread that I have been signed off for a month, as I've apparently got an acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligaments of the right knee.

So lots of reading with cups of tea it is. The first photo is 2 books I've just finished. The Amy Jeffs book I really enjoyed and found myself getting emotionally involved with the stories despite them being myth. The conspiracy book is a lightweight read, 2 books for £8 at Asda. I'm not massively well read on a lot of conspiracy stuff so it was an entertaining read for me. There were quite a few I knew nothing of.

I've just opened the Japanese ghost book, I didn't realise that it has some beautiful illustrations in it as well as plenty of reading:

Book1.jpg
 

Spudrick68

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I check Project Gutenberg and The Online Books Page everyday.

I have loads of free e books in related folders.Id be happy to send then to you if some techobod could explhow I could do it.
 

Ronnie Jersey

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I check Project Gutenberg and The Online Books Page everyday.

I have loads of free e books in related folders.Id be happy to send then to you if some techobod could explhow I could do it.
Thank You so much for the kind offer, I am so backed up in my reading as it is, I seem to come on here and other places and get absorbed in all the links that are posted, everything is so interesting, before I know it a few hours have gone by! :)
 

SimonBurchell

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Just bought mary rose barringtons book called JOTT (just one of those things) fascinating stories just wondering how many of us lot have had them
I've long thought of buying that and never got around to it.
 

ramonmercado

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Agent Sonya: Lover, Mother, Soldier, Spy, by Ben Macintyre. The story of another great spy, Ursula Kuczynski, the tale ranges from Weimar Berlin when 16 year old Ursula was batoned by a cop to spying in China, Poland, Switzerland and the UK. As always MacIntyre makes the most of the many eccentric characters she met and worked with. He excuses Sir Roger Hollis DG of MI5 as being incompetent and rather thick than being a KGB mole. Well worth a read. Review below.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2...yre-review-housewife-mother-and-communist-spy
 

Spudrick68

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I have this one saved in my Amazon basket, I'd be interested on your thoughts.

I have read it and personally I really enjoyed it. I'm no book reviewer but I am happy to share my thoughts.

I have read some Lafcadio Hearn a good number of years ago but my knowledge of Japanese culture is seriously lacking. The book describes the origins of ghostlore from Japan via theatre and ghost stories. It also relates how Japanese people think about the dead. It says to understand Japanese culture you need to understand this.

It follows a timeline of ghost lore development through literature and theatre and has a chapter on each type of ghost. It gave me a good insight and explains how the films Ringu and The Grudge carry on the mythology of Kwaidan (ghost stories).

It has made me want to watch Ringu again to see what I can pick up that I hadn't previously.
 

gordonrutter

Within reason
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I have read it and personally I really enjoyed it. I'm no book reviewer but I am happy to share my thoughts.

I have read some Lafcadio Hearn a good number of years ago but my knowledge of Japanese culture is seriously lacking. The book describes the origins of ghostlore from Japan via theatre and ghost stories. It also relates how Japanese people think about the dead. It says to understand Japanese culture you need to understand this.

It follows a timeline of ghost lore development through literature and theatre and has a chapter on each type of ghost. It gave me a good insight and explains how the films Ringu and The Grudge carry on the mythology of Kwaidan (ghost stories).

It has made me want to watch Ringu again to see what I can pick up that I hadn't previously.
Thanks.
 

uair01

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This is very pretentious but also very good:
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Splatter Capital shows how a popular subgenre of cinematic horror has developed a uniquely sensitive perspective on the cycles of capitalism. It argues that the emphatically messy brand of horror mobilized in gore or -splatter- films is extremely responsive to the internal contradictions that threaten the future sustainability of capitalist accumulation.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show...arch=true&from_srp=true&qid=ABJakPkIs5&rank=1

This is very good and extremely readable. Did it in one sitting:
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Secret, strange, dark, impure and dissonant... Enter the haunted landscapes of folk horror, a world of -pagan -village conspiracies, witch finders, and teenagers awakening to evil; of dark fairy tales, backwoods cults and obsolete technologies. Beginning with the classics Night of the Demon, Witchfinder General, The Wicker Man and Blood on Satan's Claw, We Don't Go Back surveys the genre of screen folk horror from across the world. Travelling from Watership Down to The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, with every stop in between, We Don't Go Back is a thoughtful, funny and essential overview of folk horror in TV and cinema.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show...rch=true&from_srp=true&qid=CxLRB6n77F&rank=1#

And this is very, very good. I'm a Thomas Ligotti admirer, and this is a very good analysis:
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Cardin has made a specialty in treating the multifaceted work of Thomas Ligotti, and in six substantial papers he discusses such subjects as H. P. Lovecraft’s influence on Ligotti’s work and thought, the nature of horror in such celebrated tales as “Nethescurial” and “The Bungalow House,” and other phases of the work of this master of the weird. And in a wide array of interviews, Cardin provides insight into his own vision and outlook, which have served as the basis of his weird tales.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show...d?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=ClmwjgNxTI&rank=1
 
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