Abandoned, Disused & Ruinous Places

Mythopoeika

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hmmm... the part I found weird is that it wasn't empty. They left the cans of soda in it. I figured the machine was there because it was an older model and may or may not have been considered junk by whoever owned it.
Were the drinks in OK condition? Sounds odd, yes.
 

escargot

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Bickerton Copper Mine

It is thought that copper has been mined at Bickerton and Gallantry Bank since the Bronze Age and by the Romans

Used to cycle over there as a kid.

There is a very steep railway line which we used to climb up.

My younger brother managed to fall all the way from the top to the bottom. He went end over end like a Slinky, only faster. All I could think of was 'I just KNOW Im getting the blame for this.'

Luckily for me he survived.
 

Mythopoeika

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Bickerton Copper Mine



Used to cycle over there as a kid.

There is a very steep railway line which we used to climb up.

My younger brother managed to fall all the way from the top to the bottom. He went end over end like a Slinky, only faster. All I could think of was 'I just KNOW Im getting the blame for this.'

Luckily for me he survived.
No injury? He was lucky.
 

escargot

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No injury? He was lucky.
Yup, he was about 10. At the bottom he stood straight up and started wailing in that irritating way that younger brothers do when they see an opportunity to drop a sibling in it.

All he had was a huge scarlet welt across his forehead, like a squashed strawberry. He received no medical attention.
 
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Austin Popper

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He received no medical attention.
Heh. I was hauled off to the doctor with an injury exactly one time. I was 14 or 15 by then, and it turned out to be a fracture for which I was given a splint and a warning not to dislocate it, else it would really hurt.
 

skinny

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Yup, he was about 10. At the bottom he stood straight up and started wailing in that irritating way way that younger brothers do when they see an opportunity to drop a sibling in it.

All he had was a huge scarlet welt across his forehead, like a squashed strawberry. He received no medical attention.
Bickerton Copper Mine



Used to cycle over there as a kid.

There is a very steep railway line which we used to climb up.

My younger brother managed to fall all the way from the top to the bottom. He went end over end like a Slinky, only faster. All I could think of was 'I just KNOW Im getting the blame for this.'

Luckily for me he survived.
Cheesewheel champ of 1972 right there.
:clap:
 

escargot

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Cheesewheel champ of 1972 right there.
:clap:

Yup, you mind-reader! First time I saw the cheese-rolling done I remembered Bro's epic descent. It was every bit as violent.

I am red-'ot on head injures and always insist on getting people checked over for them.
Sent a few families off to A&E after their little darlings knocked themselves silly when they slipped over when running along beside the swimming pools at work.

At the very least, having half their day wasted and paying stiff hospital parking fees would make the parents more careful about letting Junior charge around the place.
 

bugmum

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Yup, you mind-reader! First time I saw the cheese-rolling done I remembered Bro's epic descent. It was every bit as violent.

I am red-'ot on head injures and always insist on getting people checked over for them.
Sent a few families off to A&E after their little darlings knocked themselves silly when they slipped over when running along beside the swimming pools at work.

At the very least, having half their day wasted and paying stiff hospital parking fees would make the parents more careful about letting Junior charge around the place.

You're one mean mollusc. :sbump:
 

Naughty_Felid

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Yup, you mind-reader! First time I saw the cheese-rolling done I remembered Bro's epic descent. It was every bit as violent.

I am red-'ot on head injures and always insist on getting people checked over for them.
Sent a few families off to A&E after their little darlings knocked themselves silly when they slipped over when running along beside the swimming pools at work.

At the very least, having half their day wasted and paying stiff hospital parking fees would make the parents more careful about letting Junior charge around the place.

This - I wish my parents in the 70's had the same attitude. I know a few blokes who played Rugby both in the UK and NZ who suffered half a dozen concussions. I've had about 4 myself.

Some of the men can't remember a lot of their teenage years because of them. Some of them have issues with temper or emotional regulation.

Concussion syndrome is a bastard.
 

Naughty_Felid

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This - I wish my parents in the 70's had the same attitude. I know a few blokes who played Rugby both in the UK and NZ who suffered half a dozen concussions. I've had about 4 myself.

Some of the men can't remember a lot of their teenage years because of them. Some of them have issues with temper or emotional regulation.

Concussion syndrome is a bastard.

Me two as a kid. Once playing sport. Once when drunk.

It's really common in heavy impact sports around the world.
 

escargot

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This - I wish my parents in the 70's had the same attitude. I know a few blokes who played Rugby both in the UK and NZ who suffered half a dozen concussions. I've had about 4 myself.

Some of the men can't remember a lot of their teenage years because of them. Some of them have issues with temper or emotional regulation.

Concussion syndrome is a bastard.
Head injuries, even apparently minor ones, are a lot more dangerous than used to be thought, as you know. The various effects can be lasting and disastrous, and as you've learned, cause trouble in later life.

That's if they don't cause severe damage or even kill right away. Two words: Natasha Richardson. She had the classic 'lucid interval' after a head injury when all seems well, before the bleeding into the brain compresses it and causes massive pressure and destruction.

If the bleeding isn't detected soon enough and the skull isn't operated on to relieve the pressure, the patient will usually die, as Richards did.
What a terrible tragedy, considering that she could have been saved if she'd accepted the ski resort staff's advice.

The staff are trained in injury response and knew what to do for her. They called an ambulance right away but the paramedics didn't even get to see her because she refused treatment.

Take the advice, folks! The paramedics/medics would rather check you or your loved one over and send you all home than have to deal with an epidural haematoma. This is what I tell people when there's been a bump.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Head injuries, even apparently minor ones, are a lot more dangerous than used to be thought, as you know. The various effects can be lasting and disastrous, and as you've learned, cause trouble in later life.

That's if they don't cause severe damage or even kill right away. Two words: Natasha Richardson. She had the classic 'lucid interval' after a head injury when all seems well, before the bleeding into the brain compresses it and causes massive pressure and destruction.

If the bleeding isn't detected soon enough and the skull isn't operated on to relieve the pressure, the patient will usually die, as Richards did.
What a terrible tragedy, considering that she could have been saved if she'd accepted the ski resort staff's advice.

The staff are trained in injury response and knew what to do for her. They called an ambulance right away but the paramedics didn't even get to see her because she refused treatment.

Take the advice, folks! The paramedics/medics would rather check you or your loved one over and send you all home than have to deal with an epidural haematoma. This is what I tell people when there's been a bump.

Totally agree and it's not just the prospect of death it's also brain injury. I don't want to go into details but a friend is currently suffering from concussion syndrome and she's not really been back fully functioning in over a year.

Guys I know can't remember stuff after concussions, they cite changes in their personality, memory issues, dark moods, anger etc. None of this stuff was regulated in the 70's and 80's.
 

escargot

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Totally agree and it's not just the prospect of death it's also brain injury. I don't want to go into details but a friend is currently suffering from concussion syndrome and she's not really been back fully functioning in over a year.

Guys I know can't remember stuff after concussions, they cite changes in their personality, memory issues, dark moods, anger etc. None of this stuff was regulated in the 70's and 80's.

Awful. Remember the accident Richard Hammond, the TV presenter, had? Everyone tries to pretend he's back to normal but he's not.

He jokingly admits to liking celery now which he didn't before, but I've read an interview where he admits that he has the short concentration span and lack of patience that are often seen in people who've survived a brain injury.

If that's his only problem, which I don't believe for minute, he's lucky. You don't recover completely from a catastrophe like that.
 

Spudrick68

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My wifes eldest lives in Bristol and they watched the cheese rolling a few years ago. She said that only when you are there and actually see it for real do you realise how insanely steep that is. No wonder people really injure themselves.
 

maximus otter

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'World's Most Haunted Island' Where Plague Victims Were Sent

Poveglia Island, which sits off the coast of Venice and Lido in Italy, has been nicknamed the 'Island of Ghosts' because of its grisly past, having once been used as a quarantine station for people with the plague.

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According to legend, people were dragged kicking and screaming onto the small, 18-acre island - even if they showed only the slightest symptoms of the Black Death.

The land was also used as a mass burial ground, where 160,000 people are believed to have been burned to stop the disease spreading.

British urban explorers Matt Nadin, 40, and Andy Thompson, 54, were brave enough to check the island out recently, saying it was an experience they 'won't forget in a hurry'.

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[The post] shows the pair - who regularly explore abandoned and historic places together - discovering rotting buildings and huge mass burial grounds, unearthing strange items like old beds and baths... and large containers that look like they may have been used to burn bodies.

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Even to this day, human ash from the cremations are said to make up more than 50 percent of the island's soil.

Matt continued: "The island has never really been cleared properly or anything so everything has just been left.

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"Later on, when it was turned into an asylum, because people were shoved there out of the way of prying eyes, they started to do experiments on them, horrible, horrible stuff.”

https://www.ladbible.com/news/news-...ted-island-where-plague-victims-went-20201026

maximus otter
 

Tempest63

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Yup, he was about 10. At the bottom he stood straight up and started wailing in that irritating way that younger brothers do when they see an opportunity to drop a sibling in it.

All he had was a huge scarlet welt across his forehead, like a squashed strawberry. He received no medical attention.
I hope you pinched him really hard. Younger siblings were made for pinching and horse bites. (And nipple twisting...but only for male siblings)
 

Tempest63

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We walk our dogs along the disused Witham to Maldon rail line. This old structure, which is a skeleton of its former self is, I presume, some sort of old messing hut or similar for the rail workers. The local youth tend to use it as a drinking shack these days. They make a little fire when the weather is chilly and sit there drinking beer. Keeps them out of any malicious behaviour!

F243E497-C8AE-40AB-A47C-29021F2A187E.jpeg
 

michael59

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These two urban explorers have some amazing finds. They are students from the Netherlands. They speak English quite well although, some of their words are mispronounced. This last find is incredible....

 

michael59

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This place has been sitting empty for at least 30 years. It's a farm house with surrounding buildings most everything left behind, somewhere in the UK.

 

michael59

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Okay you guys have got to trust me and explore this mans channel. lol

I just watched this one below and I was so impressed that I subscribed to his channel. Same guy that did the video I just posted above.

 

blessmycottonsocks

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Okay you guys have got to trust me and explore this mans channel. lol

I just watched this one below and I was so impressed that I subscribed to his channel. Same guy that did the video I just posted above.


Good find. The piano note at 16:26 would have made Yvette Fielding pee her panties!
 

marhawkman

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I hear what might be a cat snarling at around 16:22 -16:23.
 

Stormkhan

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I've always wanted to visit Poveglia Island. We've never been to Venice yet mind.
Me too - ever since I saw a brief documentary on it. I've always had a yearning to explore abandoned and overgrown places.
 

Stormkhan

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While I love urban exploring, I feel uneasy about seeing it done to furnished homes rather than either obviously emptied or industrial buildings.
I know the "well, they've been abandoned" routine. But unlike gutted places or wrecked houses, with all the stuff still in situ, it implies that there's still owners of that property. It might be in the middle of a court settlement or relatives are hard to trace. Maybe I'm a bit squeamish over the personal stuff that's been left.
I don't feel the same way about deserted factories, or bombed out ruins, or abandoned islands ( ;) ) but 'exploring' an ordinary house seems more like being nosy or looking for loot? Not that I'm saying those who do 'explore' take anything away with them but it seems more intrusive to me. I suppose it's because most of the stuff left is so mundane and personal.
 

michael59

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While I love urban exploring, I feel uneasy about seeing it done to furnished homes rather than either obviously emptied or industrial buildings.
I know the "well, they've been abandoned" routine. But unlike gutted places or wrecked houses, with all the stuff still in situ, it implies that there's still owners of that property. It might be in the middle of a court settlement or relatives are hard to trace. Maybe I'm a bit squeamish over the personal stuff that's been left.
I don't feel the same way about deserted factories, or bombed out ruins, or abandoned islands ( ;) ) but 'exploring' an ordinary house seems more like being nosy or looking for loot? Not that I'm saying those who do 'explore' take anything away with them but it seems more intrusive to me. I suppose it's because most of the stuff left is so mundane and personal.

You're right. It is being nosy and I'm just sitting here living vicariously as I watch. I love it.

In my opinion, there is no such thing as an ordinary house. We all have a story to tell. Most people could not care less about that story and that's why 90% of these places have treasures that will never see the light of day again. They will just sit there until they decay back to nature. There are a couple of places, full of belongings that Adam Mark explored that have sat untouched for more than 50 years.

Some of these places that are full of stuff look like time capsules. It's as though all the occupants just stood up and walked out the door with just the clothes on their backs.

Maybe they won the lottery. More than likely, the bank foreclosed on their mortgage, or they owed huge amounts of back taxes and they were forced to leave while police or sheriff's stood there and watched. Some just died of old age and there was no one left to leave it to. Some probably had grown kids that moved to other countries long ago and cannot get back to their parents residence.

And then, there are some like you say, are in dispute or litigation.

As for looking for loot? Urban explorers don't take anything. They never force their way in. If a place does not have already existing open access, they leave. They are respectful and never show any personal documents or reveal addresses. They never raid the undies drawer or expose your sex toys. By taking a video camera along, they are allowing me/us to share in the adventure. They do take still photos as well. There is real beauty in untouched natural decay.

Yes, they are breaking the law and risk arrest if caught. Which is another way to keep them honest. If they are arrested and they have nothing on their person that belonged to the house, 9 out of 10 times the police let them go.

If they break in to enter, or they pocket some of the items, or they don't leave things exactly as they found them, they're not urban explorers, they're thieves and vandals.

Personally, I admire them. It tells me they live with integrity and they have a strict moral compass because some of the things they find are so beautiful and most likely worth big bucks. I'm sure it would be tempting. Not sure I could walk away from something I really wanted if I saw it sitting there surrounded by mold and debris.

We spend a lifetime accumulating stuff we believed were important treasures and they were.... to us. I remember a long time ago, my half sister badgering me to leave all my belongings to her. We argued because I said she wasn't much younger than me and would not need any of it. She was so insistent that I finally agreed just to shut her up. I no sooner agreed when I saw her take a slow look around the room and quietly say to herself, "Now, what am I going to do with all this junk." :headbang:

That old saying is really true, you can't take it with you.
 
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