Adventures In Antarctica

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
52,496
Reaction score
28,611
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Australians in Antarctica ascent

The climbers walked for almost three weeks to reach the mountain
Four Australian climbers have become the first to conquer Antarctica's highest mountain after starting from sea level.
The team reached the top of the 4,900m (16,050ft) Vinson Massif on New Year's Day after walking across some 300km (186 miles) of icy expanse.

Leader Duncan Chessell said they were "exhausted but exhilarated".

Vinson Massif, 1,200km (750 miles) from the South Pole, has been scaled before, but never after a trek from sea level.

"It was great to finally get up on top of the peak and look back over the 300-odd kilometres that we have trekked in from," Mr Chessell, 36, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation after returning to base camp.



The four men set off on their 300km trek on 10 December, using sleds to haul some 70kg (154lb) of gear.

They reached the Vinson base camp on 27 December and moved up to higher camps before setting off for the final push to the summit on 1 January.

The last eight miles involved a 1,200m climb and temperatures of minus 35 degrees Celsius.

"The view, standing alone on the tallest part of the Antarctic, was incredible - you could see almost to the South Pole," Mr Chessell said.

Mr Chessell, a veteran Mount Everest climber, has now scaled each of the seven continent's highest peaks.




http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6227501.stm


Edit to amend title.
 

Iggore

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
412
Reaction score
0
Points
32
But this beg the question... why?!
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
32,347
Reaction score
20,110
Points
314
Because it's there, the sense of achievement.
 

rynner2

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,193
Reaction score
9,175
Points
284
Iggore said:
But this beg the question... why?!
or, as this grosser modern age might ask, WTF?

but then, the modern age is gross -

those who do not understand gncxx
Because it's there, the sense of achievement.
kindly leave the thread!
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
52,496
Reaction score
28,611
Points
314
Location
Eblana
They were hoping to find the entrance to a Nazi Ufo Base.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
52,496
Reaction score
28,611
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Maria Leijerstam is first person to cycle to South Pole
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-25526541

Maria Leijerstam celebrates becoming the first person to cycle to the South Pole

Related Stories

Welsh cyclist heads for South Pole
An extreme bike ride to the South Pole
Viewpoint: The last great polar challenge

A woman from the Vale of Glamorgan has become the first person to cycle to the South Pole.

Maria Leijerstam, 35, beat two male rivals in a 500-mile (800km) challenge to ride across Antarctica in 10 days.

She faced snow drifts, white outs and crevasses during the journey on a purpose-built recumbent cycle.

Her mother Adrianne Leijerstam said the success was down to "meticulous planning, super fitness both physically and mentally, and pure determination."

Ms Leijerstam set off from the Novo Russian air force base on 16 December taking a shorter steeper route than her rivals - American Daniel Burton and Spaniard Juan Menendez Granados - and soon had a lead on them.

Maria Leijerstam
Maria Leijerstam opted for a shorter, steeper router than her two competitors
The former management consultant's route took her over the Leverett Glacier.

Adrianne Leijerstam added: "From the time she was 12 years old and announced she wanted to be an astronaut, Maria has always been an adventurer.

"We are thrilled she has made it in such good time."

In 1911 Norwegian Roald Amundsen was the first person to reach the South Pole using two-metre long skis.

He was five weeks ahead of the expedition party led by Robert Falcon Scott, which set out from Cardiff.

Scott and his four companions died on their return journey.
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
32,347
Reaction score
20,110
Points
314
That makes me think of ice speedway with the spiked tyres, although motorcycling to the South Pole would throw up a lot more challenges I suppose.

If she did a star jump when she got there, did she make a snow angel too?
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
52,496
Reaction score
28,611
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Scientists at American bases in Antarctica should be subject to regular breathalyser tests because they are prone to alcohol abuse, a report has said.

The audit carried out by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Office of the Inspector General of the US Antarctic Program (USAP) warned of the “unpredictable behaviour” created by scientists consuming alcohol.

According to the report, had “led to fights, indecent exposure, and employees arriving to work under the influence”.

Although the McMurdo base has three bars and the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station has a small shop where alcohol can be bought, it is illegal to consume alcohol in work centres and during working hours.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...exposing-themselves-report-says-a6681676.html
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
52,496
Reaction score
28,611
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Maybe The Thing is eating their brains ...

Scientists’ brains shrank a bit after an extended stay in Antarctica

Socially isolated and faced with a persistently white polar landscape, a long-term crew of an Antarctic research station saw a portion of their brains shrink during their stay, a small study finds.

“It’s very exciting to see the white desert at the beginning,” says physiologist Alexander Stahn, who began the research while at Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin. “But then it’s always the same.”

The crew of eight scientists and researchers and a cook lived and worked at the German research station Neumayer III for 14 months. Although joined by other scientists during the summer, the crew alone endured the long darkness of the polar winter, when temperatures can plummet as low as –50° Celsius and evacuation is impossible. That social isolation and monotonous environment is the closest thing on Earth to what a space explorer on a long mission may experience, says Stahn, who is interested in researching what effect such travel would have on the brain.

Stahn, now at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and his colleagues used magnetic resonance imaging to capture views of the team members’ brains before their polar stay and after their return. On average, an area of the hippocampus in the crew’s brains shrank by 7 percent over the course of the expedition, compared with healthy people matched for age and gender who didn’t stay at the station, the researchers report online December 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/scientists-brains-shrank-after-extended-stay-antarctica
 

Bigphoot2

Not sprouts! I hate sprouts.
Joined
Jul 30, 2005
Messages
9,464
Reaction score
33,423
Points
314

New Zealand’s Māori may have been first to discover Antarctica, study suggests​

Oral histories suggest the Polynesian explorer Hui Te Rangiora travelled to the region in the seventh century


Tess McClure in Christchurch
@tessairini
Fri 11 Jun 2021 06.37 BST

  • Māori may have been the first to discover Antarctica, with connections to the icy continent and its surrounding oceans stretching back to the seventh century, researchers say.
A new paper by University of Otago combines literature and oral histories, and concludes that Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand, were likely the first people to explore Antarctica’s surrounding waters, and possibly the continent in the distance.

They write that Māori and Polynesian journeys to the deep south have been occurring for a long time, perhaps as far back as the seventh century, and are recorded in a variety of oral traditions.
According to the oral histories of Māori tribal groups Ngāti Rārua and Te Āti Awa, the first human to travel to the Antarctic was the Polynesian explorer Hui Te Rangiora.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...n-first-to-discover-antarctica-study-suggests
 
Top