Alternative Medicine: Acupuncture

Tribble

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#66

Swifty

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#68
My ex once qualified for free acupuncture (it's a long story) so we both turned up at a room in Burton on Trent .. I wasn't expecting it but they offered it to me for free so I thought .. f**k it ! , why not ? and we were off ..

From memory, I had four spider leg thin needles in each ear, the seventh one going in was the only one that hurt a little and the lady doing it asked if I was a smoker, I was/am but I was underwhelmed by her reveal because smokers smell of cigarettes.

The session took half an hour, I was told it would seem time would pass quicker and that was the case .. my mobile went off at one moment and I nearly forgot I had these things in my ear.

I have to admit though, afterwards, I did feel more relaxed .. in a 'weight lifted off your shoulders' and 'walking on air' kind of way .. perhaps it works, perhaps it was a placebo effect or perhaps I was just relieved to have eight needles taken out of my head.
 
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#69
I did have acupuncture for a muscle spasm in the 'ahem' upper leg' It works, as the osteopath explained, as the body's own defence against something being stuck into it, is to relax the muscles around the are to facilitate the objects egress, like a splinter. So as a way of breaking a spasm, it's quite effective. It worked.
 

Yithian

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#70
I have a book given to me by said in-law that explains the philosophical underpinnings of traditional medicine. the problem is that it's an English translation of a Korean translation of old-fashioned Chinese and is almost incomprehensible.
 

Mythopoeika

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#71
I did have acupuncture for a muscle spasm in the 'ahem' upper leg' It works, as the osteopath explained, as the body's own defence against something being stuck into it, is to relax the muscles around the are to facilitate the objects egress, like a splinter. So as a way of breaking a spasm, it's quite effective. It worked.
Those spasms are, er, perfectly natural.
 

Frideswide

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#75
I've had acupuncture for specific fibro sites.

Have never felt them going in. There is def pain relief in areas of longstanding tension and pain.

Not saying why though..... but fewer painkillers for the next 3-7 days.
 

Tribble

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#76
If anyone has any questions about dry needling I can pass them on to Mrs. Tribble. (She'll be taking another course in it soon so can draw upon her colleagues'/instructor's knowledge if she doesn't know)
 
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#77
If anyone has any questions about dry needling I can pass them on to Mrs. Tribble. (She'll be taking another course in it soon so can draw upon her colleagues'/instructor's knowledge if she doesn't know)
Does she practice on you?
 
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#80
The exciting field of "battlefield acupuncture" involves training soldiers and medics to perform what amounts to a "theatrical placebo" involving jamming glorified thumbtacks into fellow soldiers' ears and leaving them there until they fall out.

The practice, which just keeps on expanding, is based on a handful of small, badly flawed studies. Meanwhile, the best evidence is that acupuncture itself performs no better than a placebo -- and that's the stuff that doesn't involve having a fellow soldier ineptly pierce your ear on the battlefront.

What could possibly go wrong?!

I could find no publications in the peer-reviewed medical literature to examine supporting it. Regarding the second claim, I looked up the actual study. (It’s what I do.) Let’s just say that the study is…underwhelming. Yes, it was a randomized controlled trial looking at 54 patients with acute sore throat. However, it was unblinded, a feature that renders any acupuncture trial pretty much worthless scientifically because it doesn’t account for placebo effects. Indeed, it’s a pragmatic trial. That means that the intent is to determine effectiveness under “real world” conditions; hence, no sham/placebo controls. In real medicine, pragmatic trials are used to assess the real world effectiveness of treatments already shown to be efficacious in randomized controlled clinical trials ...

https://boingboing.net/2017/03/29/weaponized-placebos.html
 
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#81
Have never felt them going in. There is def pain relief in areas of longstanding tension and pain.
A few yeas back I had a few needles in the very top of the RHS gluteous max. to relieve a painful spasm. The osteopath said the principle is that the body's reaction to an object inserted into a muscle, is to the relax the muscle to allow the object to work its way out. so the needles simply provoke a reaction which relaxes the muscle breaking the pain-->spasm-->pain loop.

I'm sceptical about acupuncture in any woo-woo sense, but that made sense and it certainly worked. I suppose it might have been the placebo effect, but I wasn't expecting it to work.

Now if I feel a spasm coming on (stop it), I jam a finger knuckle into it and hold it as long as I can and then quickly remove it, which usually does the trick. The idea is to stretch the spasming muscle a little by holding pressure unit it tires a little and relaxes slightly. The sudden removal of the knuckle leaves the muscles relaxed which breaks the cycle. Once or twice Mrs Coal has used an elbow on the larger muscles in the lower back for me.

I should say this can hurt...and I've a couple or three long-term recurring spasms the result of injuries to lower and upper back so I'm used to them and know when it might work to self-treat and when it's time to visit a professional osteopath.
 

EnolaGaia

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#82
It's not often one hears of acupuncture causing deeper injury, but it can happen ...
'Extremely Deep' Acupuncture Treatment Ends Up Piercing Patient's Lungs

An acupuncturist in New Zealand has accidentally pierced a young woman's lungs, after inserting needles in her shoulder region too deeply.

The 33-year-old patient was seeking treatment for an arm and wrist injury, which was causing pain on top of her shoulders and a shortness of breath. To treat her, the acupuncturist decided to place two needles in a nearby acupressure point, known as Jian Jing or Gallbladder 21 (GB21).

As the needles were going in, the young woman expressed pain, and later, she told the Health and Disability Commissioner that the insertions felt "extremely deep". Both needles were left in for half an hour, before they were then rotated and removed.

It was at this point that the patient felt a sudden onset of pain in her right chest and a shortness of breath. She told her acupuncturist she felt "stuffy" and she was having a strange and painful 'air' sensation around both her lungs.

The patient was sent home to rest up and take it easy, even though she was still feeling "very uncomfortable" at the end of treatment.

Later that night, the woman's husband took her to the hospital, where she was quickly referred to the emergency department. According to the New Zealand Herald, doctors here diagnosed the young woman with bilateral apical pneumothoraces, which is a lung collapse on both sides of the body, due to a top-side puncture.

In subsequent legal proceedings, it was ruled that the acupuncturist was to blame. The provider was in breach of health code, according to a commissioner, because they did not fully explain the risks to their client and they did not receive written consent. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/extremely-deep-acupuncture-treatment-ends-up-piercing-patient-s-lung
 

Tribble

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#83
It's not often one hears of acupuncture causing deeper injury, but it can happen ...


FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/extremely-deep-acupuncture-treatment-ends-up-piercing-patient-s-lung
Mrs Tribble (who is trained in acupuncture) says you always have to be careful working with certain areas. Can be easy to puncture a lung if you don't pay attention. There was a case recently in which a middle-aged man died after acupuncture to the chest - it's suspected a needle pierced the heart sac.

https://www.svt.se/nyheter/lokalt/j...-akupunkturbehandling-nal-stacks-in-i-hjartat

Think the case is still ongoing.
 

Lord Lucan

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#84
In the past I have had treatment for lower pack pain with little success, though I persevered. More recently, I tried acupuncture again (a different practitioner) for a strained shoulder and all it did was exacerbate the situation.
As a result, I've come to the conclusion that I'm just not responsive to it. On the other hand, I know some who've had great success and relief after their treatment.
 
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