Alternative Medicine: Homeopathy

Mythopoeika

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A friend of mine did some courses in homeopathic medicine. She swears by it for minor ailments, but realises that it's no good for major stuff such as cancer.
I don't think it should be completely written off, even though much of it (such as the 'massive dilution' angle) is hard to swallow.

For myself, I found that the only thing that worked for me when I had really bad hay fever was a natural homeopathic remedy.
 

kamalktk

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If it's been subjected to scientific tests, in terms of effectiveness and safety, then it's not conventionally homeopathic.
Being subjected to scientific tests of efficacy doesn't mean it "passed" them, thus explaining how it can be both scientifically tested and homeopathic at the same time. ;)
 

Ermintruder

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Being subjected to scientific tests of efficacy doesn't mean it "passed" them, thus explaining how it can be both scientifically tested and homeopathic at the same time. ;)
Seriously? I hadn't thought of that clever dualism!!

I am always impressed by the thought of industrial production dynamics for homeopathic products. Since repeated dilutions with purified water don't reduce the strength or effectiveness (allegedly), the costs for making the products must be fairly unchallenging.
 
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A leading scientist has declared homeopathy a "therapeutic dead-end" after a systematic review concluded the controversial treatment was no more effective than placebo drugs.

Professor Paul Glasziou, a leading academic in evidence based medicine at Bond University, was the chair of a working party by the National Health and Medical Research Council which was tasked with reviewing the evidence of 176 trials of homeopathy to establish if the treatment is valid.

A total of 57 systematic reviews, containing the 176 individual studies, focused on 68 different health conditions - and found there to be no evidence homeopathy was more effective than placebo on any.

Homeopathy is an alternative medicine based on the idea of diluting a substance in water. According to the NHS: “Practitioners believe that the more a substance is diluted in this way, the greater its power to treat symptoms. Many homeopathic remedies consist of substances that have been diluted many times in water until there is none or almost none of the original substance left.”

The review found “no discernible convincing effects beyond placebo” and concluded “there was no reliable evidence from research in humans that homeopathy was effective for treating the range of health conditions considered".

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...tic-review-no-evidence-it-works-a6884356.html
 

Analogue Boy

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'It.'

This is my idea for the future of books. We reduce the narrative to a diluted microbook that's easy to assimilate yet, with the right cover, gives the impression you're actually becoming rather well read. A stronger dose may look like this...

“It was a pleasure to burn.
It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed. With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history. With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the thought of what came next, he flicked the igniter and the house jumped up in a gorging fire that burned the evening sky red and yellow and black. He strode in a swarm of fireflies. He wanted above all, like the old joke, to shove a marshmallow on a stick in the furnace, while the flapping pigeon-winged books died on the porch and lawn of the house. While the books went up in sparkling whirls and blew away on a wind turned dark with burning.”
 

kamalktk

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'It.'

This is my idea for the future of books. We reduce the narrative to a diluted microbook that's easy to assimilate yet, with the right cover, gives the impression you're actually becoming rather well read. A stronger dose may look like this...

“It was a pleasure to burn.
It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed. With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history. With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the thought of what came next, he flicked the igniter and the house jumped up in a gorging fire that burned the evening sky red and yellow and black. He strode in a swarm of fireflies. He wanted above all, like the old joke, to shove a marshmallow on a stick in the furnace, while the flapping pigeon-winged books died on the porch and lawn of the house. While the books went up in sparkling whirls and blew away on a wind turned dark with burning.”
.

There, properly diluted.
 

eburacum

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It

It was a cold grey day in late November. The weather had changed overnight, when a backing wind brought a granite sky and a mizzling rain with it
(Jamaica Inn, for Rynner)
 
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It doesn't work.

Court was right to find parents guilty in son's meningitis death

David and Collet Stephan failed to seek medical care for their 19-month-old son, Ezekiel, in a timely fashion and he died. For that, they were found guilty of failing to provide the necessities of life, and rightly so.

The parents’ failings were egregious: Their toddler became increasingly ill to the point where he was lethargic and stiff as a board; they were told by a nurse that the boy was likely suffering from meningitis, a life-threatening condition; and urged by a naturopath to bring the child to a doctor, but they did not, opting instead for naturopathic “treatments” such as an echinacea tincture. They didn’t call 911 until Ezekiel stopped breathing and, by the time he was airlifted to hospital, it was too late to save him.

Despite the conviction, they remain unrepentant, painting themselves as persecuted and warning that the parenting police are out to get us all.

Hardly.

The message in the conviction is consistent with what our laws and courts have said over decades in cases with similar philosophical underpinnings – parents who refuse blood transfusion, vaccination, cancer treatment and other demonstrably beneficial medical treatments for their children in favour of prayer or other nonsense: As an adult, you can have beliefs, religious or otherwise, and you can raise your children according to those beliefs, no matter how wacky, but that does not obviate the obligation to provide the necessities of life. When a child’s health and well-being are compromised, the rules change, because a guardian has responsibilities as well as rights. ...

http://linkis.com/theglobeandmail.com/9mtNL
 

rynner2

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Prince Charles: I use homeopathy in animals to cut antibiotic use
Homeopathy sceptic Dame Sally Davies among delegates to hear prince say he treats his cows with alternative medicine
Sarah Boseley Health editor
Thursday 12 May 2016 19.46 BST

Prince Charles has proposed a solution to the growing crisis of antibiotic over-use in animals and humans, telling an international gathering of scientists and government officials in London that he treats his own cows and sheep with homeopathy.

In front of the government’s chief medical officer, Dame Sally Davies, who once told a parliamentary committee that homeopathy in humans was “rubbish” and that she was “perpetually surprised that homeopathy is available on the NHS”, the prince explained to delegates from 20 nations and organisations why he had turned to homeopathic remedies for animals.

“It was one of the reasons I converted my farming operation to an organic – or agro-ecological – system over 30 years ago and why we have been successfully using homeopathic – yes, homeopathic – treatments for my cattle and sheep as part of a programme to reduce the use of antibiotics,” he said.

The prince did not give details or stay for questions, but Clarence House later said: “Homeopathy is used on a case-by-case basis at Home Farm, in combination with more conventional medicine, to minimise dependence on antibiotics.”

The prince’s belief in homeopathic medicines for humans has long been known, as well as his support for homeopathy in the NHS. It has sparked clashes with doctors and scientists who say the remedies, which involve a drop of active substance diluted in so much water that only “the memory” of the substance remains, are not evidence-based. There have been some experts, however, who have conceded that homeopathy could have a placebo effect for those who believe it will help them.

Cows and sheep are unlikely to experience this benefit, although a group called HAWL (Homeopathy at Wellie Level) which trains farmers in its use and is funded by the prince, said it can help animals that are stressed.
“It is now well accepted that problems come at times of stress (weaning, transportation, seperation etc), and giving animals remedies at these times may well avoid disease, but it may also improve production,” its website stated. It acknowledged, however, that scientific evidence for homeopathic remedies in animals is scarce.

etc...

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...e-homeopathy-in-animals-to-cut-antibiotic-use
 
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10 children die after taking homeopathic teething pills
The US Food and Drug Administration is also looking into 400 adverse events related to the tablets

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating the deaths of 10 children and 400 adverse events surrounding the use of homeopathic teething pills.

The FDA warned that teething children should stop using the treatment, and to go to a doctor if the child exhibits symptoms such as seizures, difficulty in breathing, lethargy, excessive sleepiness, muscle weakness, skin flushing, constipation, difficulty urinating, or agitation – similar symptoms displayed over the last six years.

The agency also asked caregivers and parents to throw away any remaining pills and gels.

"Teething can be managed without prescription or over-the-counter remedies,” said Janet Woodcock, managing director of the FDA’s center for drug evaluation and research.

"We recommend parents and caregivers not give homeopathic teething tablets and gels to children and seek advice from their health care professional for safe alternatives."

CVS and Walgreens, both US pharmacies, have withdrawn the treatments from their shelves. However, there is no recall on the products, which include: Hyland's Baby Teething Tablets, Hyland's Baby Teething Tablets Nighttime and Hyland's Baby Teething Gel.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...ic-children-die-taking-remedies-a7359411.html
 
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