Art and Craft Works Made of Food / Foodstuffs

EnolaGaia

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Here's a photo of what may be the weirdest commemoration of the moon landing's 50th anniversary - a butter sculpture of the Apollo 11 crew unveiled at the Ohio State Fair this week.

Apollo11-ButterSculpture.jpeg

State fair remembers moon landing with butter astronauts

The moon may be made of cheese, but these astronauts are made of butter.

The Ohio State Fair is commemorating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing with life-size butter sculptures of Neil Armstrong and his fellow astronauts.

Gov. Mike DeWine opened the 166th edition of the fair Wednesday morning with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Afterward, the Republican governor toured the fairgrounds and stopped by this year’s annual butter display.

The display features a life-size sculpture of Wapakoneta (wah-puh-kuh-NEHT’-uh) native Armstrong saluting the American flag after planting it on the moon’s surface as he stands beside a lunar module.

The display also includes the Apollo 11 emblem and life-size sculptures of Armstrong and fellow astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins sitting beside the traditional butter cow and calf.
SOURCE: https://www.apnews.com/c0fe02e98183452985014d5b2d0c153e

IMHO it's a damned good likeness of the three crew members. Anyway ...

Butter sculptures and similar things made out of food or foodstuffs are a longstanding novelty and advertising / promotional display in midwestern US fairs. It struck me that this theme was sufficiently weird to warrant a thread.
 

EnolaGaia

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Butter sculpture turns out to have a history extending much farther back than American state fairs:

Butter carving was an ancient craft in Tibet, Babylon, Roman Britain and elsewhere. The earliest documented butter sculptures date from Europe in 1536, where they were used on banquet tables. The earliest pieces in the modern sense as public art date from ca. 1870s America, created by Caroline Shawk Brooks, a farm woman from Helena, Arkansas. The heyday of butter sculpturing was about 1890-1930, but butter sculptures are still a popular attraction at agricultural fairs, banquet tables and as decorative butter patties.
More generally ...

The history of carving food into sculptured objects is ancient. Archaeologists have found bread and pudding molds of animal and human shapes at sites from Babylon to Roman Britain.
SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butter_sculpture
 
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