Aviation Accidents

rynner2

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#1
We seem to be having a little cluster of aviation accidents recently.

Today a plane caught fire at Munich airport:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7581412.stm

Last night a Ryanair plane had to make a forced landing because of cabin decompression.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7581492.stm

Two light aircraft recently collided near Coventry, five people dead
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7567209.stm

Last week there was a disastrous crash at Madrid, many dead
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7574696.stm

At least 8 firefighters died in a Helicopter crash in California
http://www.robertreevesblog.com/tp-0710 ... 3808.shtml

At the end of last month there were two forced landings for Qantas planes
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-p ... 529451.stm

Just a statistical cluster..?
 

rynner2

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Here's an odd one:

Leaking mushroom soup halts plane

A Ryanair plane was forced to land in Germany after a passenger had an allergic reaction to mushroom soup.

The soup leaked onto the man from a jar in an overhead locker on a flight from Budapest to Dublin on Monday, the airline said.

His neck reportedly swelled up and he struggled to breathe, forcing the plane to divert for emergency medical help.

On the same day, another Ryanair flight had to make an unscheduled landing in France after losing cabin pressure.

A spokeswoman for Ryanair said the jar contained "a vegetable oil/mushroom soup type substance".

"It is procedure when a passenger requires medical attention to divert to the nearest airport," she said.

"The cabin crew and pilot take that decision."

The Boeing 737 landed at Frankfurt Hahn Airport where the man was treated by doctors.

The plane was delayed for two hours before continuing its journey to Dublin.

Oven fire

The episode was one of a series of high-altitude incidents in recent days.

On Monday, oxygen masks were deployed on a Ryanair flight from Bristol to Barcelona Girona when the cabin depressurised.

The plane was forced to land at Limoges Airport in central France and 16 people were taken to hospital suffering from ear pain.

Then on Tuesday, a Thomsonfly plane to Gatwick had to turn back to Croatia just seven minutes after take-off when a fire broke out in an oven.

A spokesman said the fire was "immediately contained" and there was "no danger to passengers or crew".

Passengers were delayed for eight hours while a replacement plane was flown from Manchester.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7585234.stm
 

EvilPumpkin

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#3
Hang on a minute though. How did a jar of mushroom soup get through the rigorous security checks? I thought you were not allowed liquids in containers over a certain size????
 

rynner2

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Dramatic pictures reveal damage caused by mid-air explosion on Qantas jet - and how passengers were lucky to survive
By Richard Shears
Last updated at 4:58 PM on 29th August 2008

A Qantas jet crippled by a mid-air explosion will be repaired and flying to London again by November - as dramatic pictures today revealed how close to disaster the aircraft had come.

Officials said the Melbourne-bound 747 jet, which made a forced landing in Manila on a flight from Heathrow, could be repaired for less than £5 million, despite extensive damage in the fuselage.

The news came as photos suggested only luck had prevented a chain reaction of exploding oxygen cylinders destroying the entire plane.

One exploding cylinder was officially blamed yesterday for the devastating blast, but what was not previously known was just how close the bottle was to six other green tanks, lined up along the right side of the cargo hold.

A preliminary report issued by inspectors from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau yesterday found the faulty cylinder, fourth in the row of strapped-in bottles, 'sustained a failure that allowed a sudden and complete release of the pressurised contents'.

And photographs of the positioning of the other containers revealed the risk of an explosive chain reaction that, given the damage caused by just one tank, could have sent the aircraft plummeting.

The aircraft, with 365 people on board on July 25, immediately lost cabin pressure when the explosion tore a 5ft high and 6.5ft wide hole in the fuselage.

The ruptured bottle was blasted up through the passenger cabin floor but everyone on board escaped injury.

'It happened very quickly,' said Mr Julian Walsh, director of the safety bureau when he released the preliminary report in Canberra.

'The oxygen bottle went from the base of the aircraft to the ceiling of the first floor cabin.'

On the way, he said, it hit the handle of the cabin door, tore a hole in the fuselage and disabled the instrument landing system and the anti-skid brake system.

While it did not discuss the risk of a possible chain reaction among the other cylinders, the initial report also gave no explanation why the exploding bottle failed under pressure.

It was part of a batch of 94 that had been made in February 1996 and had undergone regular three-yearly checks and investigators will now be tracking down other cylinders made from the same batch by the US manufacturer.

So far, said Mr Walsh, no other problems had been identified.

Qantas said the aircraft would be safe to fly again once the damage had been repaired and could resume service as early as November.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldne ... rvive.html
 

rynner2

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Four escape air accident injuries

Four people have escaped injury in two separate aircraft accidents in Devon.

A 78-year-old man from Bedfordshire was in an Enstrom 280 helicopter flying from Plymouth to Bedford when it crashed at Haytor on Dartmoor.

A man and two women had to make an emergency landing in a light aircraft in mudflats near Exminster, coming to a halt about 100ft (30m) from pylons.

Devon and Cornwall police said the Air Accidents Investigation Branch would be leading inquiries into the incidents.

The helicopter pilot, who was the aircraft's only occupant, was not hurt in the crash, which happened at about 1225 BST on Saturday. But he suffered an arm injury after climbing out to check the damage.

Emergency services dealt with a fuel leak from the aircraft, which was left on its side after the crash. The Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service covered the area with foam to make it safe.

Devon and Cornwall police said they thought poor weather conditions and low cloud contributed to the crash.

A South Western Ambulance Trust spokeswoman said: "The helicopter was trashed and he just walked away without a scratch on him. :shock:

"Chris Coles, the paramedic on the scene, said it was absolutely amazing that this guy walked away with no injuries."

The pilot, a businessman who has not been named, went back to the crash site to arrange recovery of the helicopter which had been due to land at Dunkeswell airfield en route.

Forced landing

The plane involved in the Exminster crash was flying from Exeter to Jersey when its male pilot realised there was a problem and turned around.

The aircraft was forced to land on mudflats between power lines and pylons at about 1530 BST on Saturday. It also missed some livestock in the area.

Police were informed of the plane crash after Exeter Air Traffic Control reporting it coming down near Topsham.

The police helicopter flew to the scene and located the plane on wetlands between Exminster and Topsham on the Exminster side of the River Clyst.

Ambulance crews were up to their chests in water at some points when getting to the aircraft occupants. The plane had a full tank of fuel.

The South Western Ambulance Trust spokeswoman said: "The pilot was a bit of a hero landing in these mudflats."

She added: "It's just amazing, two miraculous escapes. It's very unusual to have two forced landings in one day. We are just pleased they weren't injured."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/devon/7589907.stm

'two forced landings in one day...' in the same county!
 

rynner2

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#8
Pictures on page:

Pictured: The dramatic scene after a 'Red Arrows' Hawk jet crash-landed and smashed into RAF base

By Andy Dolan
Last updated at 10:26 PM on 11th September 2008


As car park prangs go, this was more serious than the average shunt.

But it could have been far worse - considering it involved a runaway RAF Hawk jet.

The £5million aircraft was due to become part of the Red Arrows fleet.

It was being delivered to RAF Cranwell in Lincolnshire to be sprayed in the display team's signature red livery when it crashed on landing and skidded off the runway.

The Hawk hurtled across the airfield, smashing into a crew building and three cars before coming to a rest next to the air traffic control tower.

It also destroyed some of the building's windows in the process.

The two-man crew ejected during the drama and were treated in hospital for their injuries.

The plane was understood to have been flown by Wing Commander David Firth-Wigglesworth, 43, the Red Arrows' Senior Flying Officer.

One witness to the crash said: 'As the aircraft touched down, its undercarriage gave way and it swerved to the right. Two loud bangs followed as the aircrew ejected.'

A source at RAF Cranwell added: 'A friend of mine had just left the building hit by the Hawk. If he hadn't left when he did, he wouldn't be here now.'

An investigation is being carried out into the cause of the accident.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -base.html
 

rynner2

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Passengers get out and push plane along runway
Passengers were forced to push the plane they had been travelling on along the runway after its engine failed.

By Our Foreign Staff
Last Updated: 3:01AM BST 27 Sep 2008

Those travelling on a Chinese Shandong airlines flight were asked to get out and push when their plane broke down after landing.

The CRJ7 plane with 69 passengers and seven aircrew flying from Guilin in the south of China to Zhengzhou broke down before it could taxi to the arrivals terminal. It had travelled 500 miles before the engine failed on the runway.

Airport staff were called out to push, but needed the passengers' help because it would not budge.

It took nearly two hours to push the jet the half mile to a side lane.

"Thank God it was only a 20-ton medium-sized plane," said one of the airport workers. "If it were a big plane, it would have knocked us out."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstop ... unway.html
 

alytha

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Hmm..what did we have in the last couple of weeks...

The usual birdstrikes and Bombardier Q400 that have to turn back or don't take off at all because they're not working properly again.

The more interesting ones:
There was an airshow two weeks ago where one of our local general aviation clubs offered flights for the visitors. One of the pilots turned off the runway and mistook the road around the perimeter of the airport for the taxiway. She also ran into some traffic signs and damaged the wings on her plane.

Then we had another private pilot who almost landed on top of a Swissair because the tower had told him that the runway was clear...
 

rynner2

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A bit of a mystery here - perhaps it was a Close Encounter! :shock:

Australian plane makes emergency landing after 'mid-air incident' injures 40
An Australian plane has been forced to make an emergency landing following an as-yet unspecified mid-air incident left 40 people injured.

Last Updated: 8:04AM BST 07 Oct 2008

The Airbus A320 made a successful landing at an airfield in the Western Australian town of Exmouth after issuing a mayday emergency call.

"It is understood up to 40 people were injured during a mid-air incident," Sergeant Greg Lambert of the West Australian Police told the Australian Associated Press. "The nature of the mid-air incident is unknown."

Emergency services and medical staff were on standby at the airport, which lies about 1,100 kilometres (680 miles) northeast of the state capital of Perth.

It was not immediately clear which airline operates the jet involved in the incident.

Australia's national carrier Qantas, which has suffered a spate of incidents in recent months, told AFP it had no information about the incident but was working to find out more.

Qantas also owns the discount airline Jetstar, which operates around 29 Airbus A320s on domestic routes.

In July, an exploding oxygen bottle punched a huge hole in the side of a Qantas Boeing 747-400, forcing an emergency landing in the Philippines. No passengers were injured in the mid-air drama.

Air safety investigators announced a safety review of Qantas, which has long been known as the world's safest airline, after two other incidents occurred involving its aircraft within two weeks.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... es-40.html
 

rynner2

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More..

Up to 50 injured in Qantas 'mid-air incident'
The incident is the latest safety scare to hit Qantas, Australia's national carrier
Sophie Tedmanson in Sydney

Up to 50 people have suffered broken bones and other injuries when a Qantas plane carrying more than 300 passengers was involved in a “mid-air incident” and was forced to make an emergency landing in Western Australia.

The plane was en route from Singapore to Melbourne in southern Australia when it was forced to land at Learmonth airport in the town of Exmouth, 1,200km north of Perth in Western Australia at 1.30pm local time (4.30amBST).

A spokesman for Western Australia Police told Times Online that passengers were being treated by nurses at the scene and would then be transferred to a local hospital. Police are also at the scene.

He said he understands that nobody has received life-threatening injuries.

Qantas said that “a number of passengers and crew sustained injuries, including fractures and lacerations” on board QF72, which was due to land in Perth.

The airline said the problem was related to “a sudden change in altitude” but no details are yet available as to what caused the altitude change.

...

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/w ... 897076.ece
 

rynner2

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"We have had some information that it possibly was turbulence, but we haven't had that confirmed at this stage," Sgt Clifford told ABC.

However, Western Australia Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan later told the Sydney Morning Herald that he understood the incident had been caused by "some sort of systems failure".

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-p ... 656171.stm
 

rynner2

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Terror-plunge Qantas jet suffered computer glitch, say investigators
By Richard Shears
Last updated at 9:27 AM on 08th October 2008

A computer glitch may have sent a Qantas jet plunging nose-first thousands of feet seriously injuring passengers, investigators have revealed.

An 'irregularity' has been found in passenger plane's computer equipment, raising speculation that air turbulence was not to blame.
Pilots received a warning on their instruments before the airbus was forced to make an emergency landing in northern Australia.

Twelve passengers were seriously hurt, suffering spinal injuries, broken noses and head trauma when they were smashed against the ceiling of the A330-300 as it suddenly plunged a reported 6,5000ft. :shock:

The director of Australia's Transport Safety Bureau, Julian Walsh, said that the pilots received 'electronic centralised aircraft monitoring messages in the cockpit relating to some irregularity with the aircraft's elevator control system.'

"The aircraft departed normal flight and climbed 300 feet," said Julian Walsh, director of aviation safety with the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB).
"The aircraft did that of its own accord and then, whilst the crew were doing the normal actions in response to that not normal situation, the aircraft then pitched down suddenly and quite rapidly," he said.

Among the British passengers on board as the aircraft flew from Singapore to Perth - before making an emergency landing at Exmouth, 1000 miles north of Perth - were Henry and Doreen Bishop of Oxford.

They described the incident as one of the worst experiences of their lives.

'People were screaming, but they cut off any panic that might have started,' said Mr Bishop, in a reference to the pilot telling everyone to sit down and buckle up.

'I put it down to life,' said Mr Bishop. 'The Titanic hit an iceberg, we hit an air pocket.'

One passenger, Mr Jim Ford, said he thought he was about to die as he watched people being thrown around the cabin.
'It was horrendous, absolutely gruesome, terrible, the worst experience of my life,' he said.

Passenger Ben Cave said that for a few seconds he had feared for his life and had seen 'a bit of a flash before me.'

He said the aircraft had a 'major fall' and another fall shortly after.

'I hit the ceiling but I was OK. I only got a few bruises and
strains. I just remember seeing that the plane was a mess.'

Passengers told of 'mayhem' on board when the plane dropped.

'Children and babies who weren't buckled in hit the ceiling,' said one man.

'The poor little kid next to us, we watched him hit the ceiling and sit there for about three seconds until his dad dragged him back into his seat,' said passenger Mark Bell.

Another passenger, Mike Maxwell said some people had left their seats and were waiting to use the toilets 'so they were the ones who really suffered worse I suppose, and people with young children and so on, babies hitting the ceiling and come down again.'

West Australian Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan confirmed today that investigations were continuing into the possibility of 'some sort of systems failure'.

'We're not sure yet. We're still waiting for further information,' he said.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldne ... ators.html

Gives a new meaning to 'bouncing babies'....
:shock:
 

rynner2

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Qantas plane given 'piggy-back' ride across Pacific by another aircraft after it was forced to fly blind by equipment failure
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 2:10 AM on 30th October 2008

A Qantas jet had to follow another plane across the Pacific after its weather radar broke down, leaving it 'flying blind'.

The captain of the Boeing 747, which was flying 284 passengers from Los Angeles to Sydney, had to ask an Air New Zealand flight for help so that it could fly 'piggy-back'.

Passengers woke up to find the second plane flying 2,000ft away from their left wing.

The captain told the passengers that he had been 'flying blind' - as far as the weather was concerned.

The Qantas jet diverted to Auckland where it landed safely.
A Qantas spokesman said passengers were not in danger but the assistance of the Air New Zealand aircraft was requested because the weather antenna was [not] working to full satisfaction.

The flight crew, he said, 'chose the safest option to divert to Auckland, which had preferable weather to other diversion options, coupled with the fact the Air New Zealand plane was there to provide guidance.
The airline said the Air New Zealand flight was 35km away from the Qantas jet when the captain made radio contact asking for assistance across the Pacific.
As the two aircraft flew within some two thousand feet of one another, weather updates were relayed from the Air New Zealand jet to the Qantas aircraft.

At Auckland a replacement antenna was waiting to be fitted and the Sydney-bound passengers eventually arrived at their destination four hours late.
A second Qantas jet meanwhile was forced to turn back to Melbourne after take-off for Sydney when landing gear problems were detected. It landed without incident.
Qantas has been beset with problems this year, including a recent incident when a computer problem caused a jet to suddenly plunge near Western Australia, resulting in dozens of passengers being injured.

Earlier in the year an exploding oxygen cylinder blew a hole in the side of a jet, causing the aircraft to make an emergency landing in Manila as it flew from Hong Kong to Melbourne.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldne ... ilure.html
 

rynner2

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Bird-hit jet in emergency landing

Rome's Ciampino airport has temporarily closed after a Ryanair flight from Frankfurt suffered "substantial damage" as it made an emergency landing.

The budget airline said the plane had experienced problems after birds were sucked into the engine as it came in to land at Rome's second-largest airport.

Passengers left the Boeing 737 using emergency chutes.

The plane remains on the runway with one engine resting on the tarmac because of damage to the landing gear.

It is being examined by Ryanair engineers and the Italian Aviation Authority. People were crying, it was terrible, it was a bad experience

Ryanair said the airport, which hosts several budget airlines, was likely to remain closed for the rest of Monday.

Ryanair flight FR4102 from Frankfurt to Rome had 166 passengers on board.

Reports say two cabin crew and at least three passengers were taken to hospital with minor injuries. One passenger said an engine had begun to smoke as the plane was coming in to land and it then descended rapidly.

"People were crying, it was terrible," he added.

Another passenger said he thanked God that nobody had died.

A picture of the plane on the Ryanair website appeared to show red marks on the nose cone and wings - presumably from the birds.

Other Ryanair flights would be diverted to Rome's other airport, Fiumicino, until Ciampino was re-opened, the airline said.

At least 219 people have been killed worldwide since 1988 as a result of wildlife strikes to aircraft, according to the organisation Bird Strike Committee USA.

A US Federal Aviation Administration study has found that between 1990 and 2007, more than 82,000 wildlife strikes were reported at more than 1600 American airports.

The phenomenon causes billions of dollars of damage to aircraft worldwide.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7719716.stm
 

rynner2

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Jinxed?

Qantas 747 crashes into another jet while being repaired after mid-air explosion
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 9:19 AM on 18th November 2008

A Qantas 747 that was damaged by a mid-air explosion in July crashed into another jumbo jet today while being towed on tarmac.
The nose of one of the jets caved in after hitting - and denting - the left wing of the other while being moved at the carrier’s maintenance base at Melbourne’s Avalon Airport.
No passengers were aboard either plane.

Staff involved in this morning’s collision, which occurred about 9.30am local time, have been suspended pending a full investigation, a Qantas spokesman said.
He confirmed one of the planes was the aircraft that was forced to make an emergency landing on July 25 after its oxygen tank exploded.
The explosion ripped a hole in the fuselage and caused rapid cabin decompression as the plane flew over the South China Sea.
None of the 365 people aboard was injured and the pilot safely made an emergency landing in Manila in the Philippines.

Repairs to the aircraft involved in the July incident were undertaken in Manila by Boeing, but further work was being done at Avalon.
The plane has not carried passengers since the emergency landing four months ago.

The Qantas spokesman said it was too early to determine the cause of the crash.
He added: ‘Both aircraft sustained some damage, the extent of that is still being assessed.’
The airline believes both 747s will be out of action for at least a few days.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldne ... osion.html
 

rynner2

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Not just a pretty face... ;)

Air hostess helped land passenger jet after co-pilot had 'breakdown' over the Atlantic
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 9:56 AM on 20th November 2008

An air hostess helped land a jet carrying 146 passengers after the co-pilot had an apparent mental breakdown over the Atlantic Ocean, investigators revealed today.
The UK-bound plane made an emergency diversion to Shannon Airport, in Ireland, last January after the Air Canada flight officer began a ‘rambling and disjointed’ conversation, said an official report.
Another attendant suffered wrist injuries as the crew forcibly removed the co-pilot from the cockpit controls and restrained him in a seat in the cabin.

The captain of the Boeing 767 from Toronto to Heathrow asked staff to seek out any trained pilots onboard.
One of the female cabin crew came forward saying she had a commercial pilot’s licence and was asked to take over in the co-pilot’s seat.
The captain praised the attendant to investigators for helping him safely land the plane at Shannon, where the ill flight officer was removed and admitted to the acute psychiatric unit of Ennis Regional Hospital for 11 days.
He was later flown home to Canada by an air ambulance for further care, according to the investigation.

The official report into the incident by the Irish Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) did not explicitly refer to the co-pilot’s medical condition.
But it recorded the views of two doctors onboard that he was in a ‘confused and disorientated state’.
The captain also reported that his colleague became uncharacteristically ‘belligerent and unco-operative’ and was ‘effectively incapacitated’.
One passenger at the time reported seeing the distraught co-pilot yelling for God as he was being restrained.

The AAIU praised the actions of both the captain and crew in diverting to the nearest airport and removing the co-pilot from the controls.
‘For his own well-being and the safety of the aircraft, the most appropriate course of action was to stand him down from duty and seek medical attention which was available on board,’ said the report.
‘The commander (captain) realising he was faced with a difficult and serious situation used tact and understanding and kept control of the situation at all times.
‘The situation was dealt with in a professional manner... As such, the commander and flight attendants should be commended for their professionalism in the handling of this event.’
There were no safety recommendations from the investigation.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldne ... antic.html
 

rynner2

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'This is your captain. Sorry... but I'm not qualified to land the plane,' Flybe pilot tells stunned passengers
By Luke Salkeld
Last updated at 10:55 PM on 17th December 2008

They are not the most comforting words to hear at 30,000ft.

So imagine the shock of passengers on a Flybe aircraft who heard the captain announce: 'Sorry, I'm not qualified to land the plane.'

He then turned it around and flew back to the airport they had left hours earlier.

A pilot flying a Flybe aircraft like this one to Paris had to travel 300 miles back to Cardiff because he was not trained to land this particular plane in fog
Yesterday passengers spoke of their shock at hearing the announcement as they waited for the 80-seater plane to land in Paris, which was shrouded in thick fog.

Their captain had more than 30 years of flying experience - but he had only recently started to pilot the type of plane they were in.

This meant he had not passed the necessary low-visibility training. After making the unsettling announcement at the end of the 300 mile journey, the captain flew back to Cardiff airport instead.

Cassandra Grant, 29, said: 'We were about 20 minutes from landing, when the captain said: "Unfortunately I'm not qualified to land the plane in Paris. We'll have to fly back".' :shock:

She added: 'It was amazing. The whole thing beggars belief. The captain apologised but said it was down to his qualification status.'

Miss Grant and her fellow passengers on flight BE1431 had already been delayed for three hours by fog at Cardiff International Airport on Tuesday morning.
Luckily, by the time the plane returned to Wales, the runway was clear. Miss Grant added: 'There were a lot of puzzled and disappointed people on board. 'When the pilot said he couldn't land the plane we all thought: "Pardon? You can fly a plane but you can't land it?"

'Everyone was pretty appalled but there was some concern that the pilot wasn't fully qualified.

'I would expect an airline pilot to have every qualification possible - then a few more.

'If he couldn't land in the Paris fog what would have happened if it was foggy back in Cardiff?'

Yesterday a spokesman for Flybe stood by the decision taken by its unnamed captain.

She said: 'He has relatively recently transferred his type-rating from a Bombardier Q300 to a Bombardier Q400.

'He has not yet completed the requisite low-visibility training to complete a landing in conditions such as the dense fog experienced in Paris Charles de Gaulle. The captain therefore quite correctly turned the aircraft around and returned to Cardiff, a decision which the company stands by 100 per cent.'

It is understood the plane could not be landed by the co-pilot as both pilots must have the correct flying qualifications.

The Civil Aviation Authority yesterday backed the pilot's action and said: 'He did the right thing.'

A spokesman added: 'If he had landed in Paris he could have been prosecuted.

'It is not like driving a car where you can pull over into a lay-by to look up the handbook. A pilot can't do that at 12,000 feet with 100 passengers sitting behind.'

Independent aviation consultant Simon Gill said: 'His only mistake was announcing his lack of qualification. If he had just said it was not safe to land because of adverse weather conditions, nobody would have minded.'

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... ngers.html
 

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Pictured: Blazing Boeing 737 torn in half - but all 115 people escape alive
By Mail Foreign Service
Last updated at 9:11 AM on 22nd December 2008

A Boeing 737 with 115 passengers and crew on board was almost torn in half when it crashed on take-off and burst into flames - but everyone got off the plane alive.

'It was a miracle that everybody survived the impact and the fire,' said assistant fire chief Bill Davis. 'It was just amazing.'

Continental Airlines Flight 1404 was taxiing along the runway at Denver International Airport on Saturday evening when it veered off course.

Debris was scattered on the runway behind the plane which came to rest in a snow-covered ravine 200 yards from one of the airport's fire stations.

The entire right side of the plane was burned and melted plastic from overhead compartments dripped onto the seats.

A crack encircled much of the fuselage and the left engine had broken loose and ended up 30 feet away.

Passengers and crew members scrambled from the plane on emergency slides and walked out of the ravine. One of those on board, Emily Pellegrini, said of the attempt to take off: 'It was bumpy, then it was bumpier, then it wasn't bumpy.'

Thirty-eight people suffered injuries, including broken bones, with one listed as serious.

Federal aviation investigators said the weather was cold but not snowy at the time of the crash.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldne ... l#comments

(By coincidence, I was reading a crime novel yesterday that also featured a plane crash where everyone escaped.)
 

rynner2

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#23
Two Britons charged with manslaughter of 121 who died in 2005 Athens air crash
By David Williams
Last updated at 6:17 PM on 23rd December 2008

Two Britons have been charged with manslaughter over the 'ghost flight' of a holiday jet which flew for two hours with passengers and crew unconscious before crashing into a Greek mountain.
The unidentified Britons are among five airline workers to face charges of manslaughter and causing death through negligence in connection with the mystery 2005 plane crash which killed 121 people, including 48 children, in Greece's worst air disaster.

It is unclear whether the Britons, who have been questioned by air accident investigators, are still in Cyprus or if they are in the UK, in which case they could face extradition to face charges that carry a maximum penalty of life in jail.
All five are charged to appear before a Cypriot court on February 26 and officials said European arrest warrants will be issued if they fail to attend.

The Helios Airways Boeing 737-300 was travelling from Larnaca in Cyprus to Prague when it crashed north of Athens on August 14 2005, killing everyone on board.
Experts believed they froze to death at minus 50C after a catastrophic drop in cabin temperature at 35,000 ft.
With the two pilots unconscious through lack of oxygen, the plane flew on until it ran out of fuel and plunged into a ravine near the Greek capital and caught fire.

Greek fighter pilots who were scrambled to intercept it when it entered Greek airspace without responding to air traffic controllers, saw one of the pilots slumped in his seat.
They said two people appeared to try to take control of the plane and desperately battle to take over controls.
The fighter pilots came close enough to see into the cockpit and the passenger cabin, where they reported seeing oxygen masks hanging down. They tracked the aircraft for 45 minutes before it crashed.
One passenger sent a harrowing text message to his cousin, saying: 'The pilot's turned blue. My cousin, I bid you farewell, we are all frozen.'

An aviation expert said at the time: 'It would have been like standing on top of Everest.'

Rescuers said they found two bodies, strapped in their seats, locked in a final hug.
Investigators found a failure to switch a valve regulating oxygen supply to the aircraft knocked its pilots and most of the passengers unconscious shortly after the plane took off.
They found the aircraft glided on autopilot in Greek air space for two hours before it ran out of fuel and smashed into a hillside.
A flight attendant with a trainee pilot's licence, probably the only person conscious on the plane, took the controls and tried in vain to avert the disaster. It was the attendant who had been spotted in the cockpit by Greek fighter pilots.

An inquiry by Greek authorities published in October 2006 cited perceived deficiencies in the safety culture of the airline.
Under Cyprus law, manslaughter carries a maximum jail term of life, and death through negligence or reckless behaviour four years.
Helios, which was renamed after the disaster, has since shut down.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... crash.html
 

rynner2

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BA staff arrested over jet damage

Two British Airways (BA) ground staff were arrested after an aeroplane was damaged at Heathrow Airport in west London, police have said.

The pair, 54 and 49, were questioned over an allegation that a baggage truck was driven into a BA jet on 9 January, BBC crime correspondent Ben Ando said.

He said police did not believe the incident was terrorism-related.

The pair have been released on bail. A BA spokeswoman said they had been suspended while the inquiry continues.

The Airbus A321 jet is currently being examined by BA engineers.

The 80 passengers due to fly on the plane had to be put on another flight.

Mr Ando said a police source had described the damage as a gash to the fuselage.

"The damage was spotted by other members of ground crew before the plane took off," he said.

"Had it got into the air with this damage it is difficult to know what could have happened - the worst case could have been a catastrophic decompression of the plane causing it to crash.

"On the other hand something more controlled could have taken place - perhaps there was no real damage at all.

"Until the engineers complete their checks it is difficult to know what could have happened."

The BA spokeswoman said: "Two members of our ground staff based at Heathrow were arrested following an incident where one of our aircraft was damaged.

"They were both questioned by the police and released on bail pending further inquiries.

"It would therefore be inappropriate to give further details.

"The two staff members have been given a precautionary suspension, without prejudice, while the police carry out their investigation."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/7828771.stm
 

rynner2

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#25
A sort of irony that the day after the UK government gave the green light to Heathrow's third runway, there should be a major crash in another big city, New York, although miraculously without loss of life. (See separate thread, http://www2.forteantimes.com/forum/view ... 106#847106 )

It's just a year ago since another 'miracle' crash-landing occured at Heathrow itself - remember this?
British Airways flight BA 038 inbound to London Heathrow, from Beijing, China today at 12:42 pm local time (12:42 GMT) has crash landed just a few meters off the beginning of Heathrow’s Southern runway (unlucky?). From another point of view, it crash landed just a few meters off of a congested two way road, just inside the boundaries and fences of Heathrow Airport (lucky!!).

According to the first reports by BBC and declined to be commented by British Airways, the aircraft has lost some (or all) of its power and avionics systems while descending to the airport, and it equals to a miracle that the pilot managed to reach the territory of the airport by gliding this huge bird “nose up”, and not crash-land into the heavily populated residential areas of West-London. This is the FIRST Report, only a few hours after the crash, so as investigations will take place, the findings may change the descriptions of the cause.

http://airlineworld.wordpress.com/2008/ ... -heathrow/
Is having giant machines flying over major cities really a good idea?

Because planes have crashed on cities before:
On October 4, 1992, El Al Flight 1862, a Boeing 747 cargo plane of the Israeli airline El Al, crashed into the Groeneveen and Klein-Kruitberg flats in the Bijlmermeer (colloquially "Bijlmer") neighbourhood (part of Amsterdam Zuidoost) of Amsterdam, Netherlands. A total of 43 people were killed, consisting of the plane's crew of three and a non-revenue passenger in a jumpseat, plus 39 persons on the ground. Many more were injured.

http://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Bijlmerramp
 

rynner2

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#26
The unluckiest pig in the world, and more
04 February 2009

BLAMING Canada geese for forcing a US Airways jet to ditch in the Hudson river seems logical. They're big enough to cause serious damage to any plane that hits them, and thousands have settled around New York City. Sure enough, when we checked the Federal Aviation Administration's National Wildlife Strike Database at www.planestrikes.notlong.com, Canada geese were high on the list, with 1266 reports of them hitting aircraft between 1990 and 2008, 103 of which were in New York State.

With all three New York City airports close to the ocean, gulls also seemed likely suspects and, yes, over the same period, 1208 gull strikes were reported in New York, out of a total of 9843 gulls that collided with planes across the US. Further scrutiny of the list revealed that other collision victims include 145 bald eagles and 15 black-capped chickadees. An endangered whooping crane was hit in Wisconsin. We began to think that nothing that flies is safe. Then we spotted an entry for turtles.

One can imagine circumstances in which turtles could become airborne, although not of the turtle's volition. It would, however, seem quite hard to hit a plane with a tossed turtle. Yet 80 turtles suffered this fate, including 23 in New York State. The turtles weren't alone. Armadillos are, if anything, even less aerodynamic than turtles, yet planes struck 14 of them in Florida, two in Louisiana and one in Oklahoma, although Texas armadillos successfully avoided aircraft. In addition, 13 American alligators hit planes in Florida.

We can report that our mental picture of airborne armadillos, alligators and turtles did not survive long. We were forced to conclude that although the FAA doesn't specify it, these animals had their collisions with aircraft on the ground, presumably during take-off and landing. It was interesting to note, though, that some terrestrial species seem much better at dodging planes than others. No one reported hitting wolves, bears, sheep or goats, but the toll included 811 deer, 310 coyotes, 146 skunks, 146 foxes, 33 domestic dogs, 18 domestic cats, eight cattle, six moose, five horses, two river otters, and a single unfortunate pig.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg2 ... 943.200_fb
 

rynner2

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#27
Pictured: 'Sully lite' as pilot crash-lands his Piper jet in just TWO FEET of water... and wades to safety
By Richard Shears
Last updated at 1:03 PM on 06th February 2009

If at first glance it appears to be another view of the jet that landed on New York's Hudson River, take another look.
The aircraft that landed safely on water this time was a light plane carrying only five passengers - astonishingly, all of whom were able to walk to safety to a nearby beach this morning.
The drama occurred when the pilot, Steve Bolle, experienced trouble with the engine as the aircraft flew over Darwin harbour in Northern Australia.

'The pilot realised he wouldn't be able to make it back to the airport so he's made a decision to land it on the beach,' said Police Superintendent Rob Farmer of Darwin police.

The aircraft didn't quite make it to the beach, but landed in just two feet of water - making the pilot and passengers very lucky it was such a light plane.
The water was shallow enough to allow the passengers - a group of IT technicians bound for a remote Aboriginal desert community - to wade 200 metres safely to shore.
Australian press have already dubbed the incident 'Sully lite' after USAirways pilot Chesley B. Sullenberger landed a massive Airbus safely on the Hudson River in New York City - saving the lives of all 150 people on board.

Resident Glenn Chandler told the Sydney Morning Herald he was having a bike ride when he spotted two council workers staring out to sea.
'Two hundred metres off shore there's just this plane sitting in the harbour with water up to its wings and half a dozen people are standing around next to it in water up to their waists, sort of scratching their heads,' Mr Chandler said. 8)

'Then they just slowly dawdled back to shore ... chatting among themselves. It was quite a surreal thing.
'Obviously no one was hurt because there was no panic or anything.'

Darwin resident Mel Collins, who witnessed the plane come down from her apartment said: 'I was sitting down for my first cup of coffee for the morning and the plane came from the left at the back of the flat, really close to the water.
'It was really close and I thought "What's going on with that?" Then it touched down on the water.'
None of the passengers required medical attention, one of them commenting: 'The pilot did a good job.'

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldne ... afety.html
 

Quake42

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#28
Turkey plane crashes in Amsterdam

A Turkish Airlines plane has crashed on landing at Amsterdam's Schiphol international airport.

The plane, with 135 passengers on board, crashed near the A9 motorway and suffered significant damage.

It was Flight 1951 from Istanbul and was a 737-800 aircraft.

One person has been killed, and 20 passengers were injured. But Turkish media said at least 50 people had survived unhurt and some 20 people were seen walking away from the plane.

The BBC's Geraldine Coughlan in the Hague says Dutch television has been showing pictures of helicopters at the scene, with about 20 ambulances and fire engines.

Schiphol is the fifth-largest passenger airport in Europe.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7909683.stm
 
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#29
My Minister.

Ah well, better look next time.

Minister escapes injury as helicopter loses door mid-air
CONOR POPE ANNE LUCEY and

Tue, Mar 03, 2009

MINISTER FOR Tourism Martin Cullen escaped injury yesterday when the door of a helicopter in which he was travelling dropped off in mid-air and fell 500ft into Killarney National Park, Co Kerry.

The Air Corps helicopter was bringing the Minister and one of his officials back to Dublin from an Irish Hotels’ Federation conference in Co Kerry, when it was forced to make an emergency landing at a helicopter pad at Killarney Golf and Fishing Club.

The ministerial group was barely three minutes into the 80-minute journey when the door of the AW 139 helicopter fell off.

The incident happened shortly after 3.30pm.

It took several minutes for the helicopter to make what a Defence Forces spokesman called a “precautionary landing” on the golf club’s helipad.

One of the first people to greet Mr Cullen when the damaged helicopter touched down was Senator Paul Coghlan (Fine Gael), the president of the golf club.

Mr Coghlan said the Minister had got a fright but was taken to the club house where he was given a cup of tea.

A spokesman for the Defence Forces said no one was injured in the incident.

“I’m sure they got a fright but they were at no risk at all.”

He said the Minister and his assistant, who had been travelling with a crew of three, would have been securely strapped in and pointed out that the helicopter is able to fly with its doors open, as long as it travels below certain speeds.

The aircraft routinely flies with the doors open during military exercises and search-and-rescue operations, he added.

While the passengers and crew may have been secure at all times, the same cannot be said for the door, and its whereabouts remained unknown last night. However, gardaí and military personnel have concentrated their search in a small area of the national park.

A military airworthiness inspection team and technicians from Air Corps headquarters at Casement Aerodrome, Baldonnel, Co Dublin, flew to Kerry last night to begin an investigation.

The Department of Defence spokesman said it was far too early to say what the cause of the incident was but said all avenues would be explored to determine where the fault was.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/fro ... 52024.html
 

rynner2

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#30
Um, sorry to cause a fuss, but the plane seems to be on fire
Matt Rudd has a jolly good go at learning how to survive an air disaster

You’ll never guess what the fat-cat oil and banking barons are up to now. They’re only sneaking off to Heathrow and paying British Airways to train them in the art of evacuating an aeroplane. So that they can get out of a crash before the rest of us.

“That’s not the case,” insists Andy Clubb of British Airways Flight Training. “We’re training delegates to react quickly and effectively in the event of a crash. Other passengers will see what they’re doing and follow them. They’ll be an excellent example. Lives will be saved.”

I know what you’re thinking. I was thinking the same. A banker leading everyone out of a burning plane, all heroic and nonbankerish? Not even trying to swizz you on savings rates as he goes? It just doesn’t add up.

I am not bothered, though, because I have now done the four-hour course as well. In the unlikely event of you and me finding ourselves together on a plane hurtling towards (a) the Hudson or (b) something point-ier, and in the even unlikelier event that we both survive the impact, I will be getting out before you. With my kids. And, depending on how we are getting on, maybe my wife too.

The course has been running quietly for the past few years, but since the miraculous Hudson ditching, in which all 155 passengers and crew survived, there has been something of a surge in inquiries.

Given that most of us don’t pay attention to the bog-standard safety briefing at the start of a flight, why would anyone pay to sit through the four-hour version?

Because it involves jumping down a two-storey-high emergency slide, crawling out of a smoke-filled cabin and surviving a simulated crash-landing. Forget paintballing and lap dancing: this is the ultimate team-bonding exercise. It’s health and safety the fun way. Corporates love it.
:D

Still, my course began with a “health and safety introduction”. Yes, they told us how to escape from the classroom in which we would learn how to escape from a plane. :roll: Boring. But then we made our way to the large hangar where all BA crew learn their emergency evacuation drills. Clubb stopped his amiable banter and we boarded a very realistic pretend 737. Not boring.

“Welcome to flight BA234 to Dakar. Please fasten your seatbelts. Doors to manual and cross-check,” said his colleague convincingly.

I fastened my seatbelt. We watched the cabin crew’s safety demo (more avidly than usual). We trundled down the runway and took off. I had completely forgotten it was a simulator rattling us around. I was off to Dakar. Never been. Apparently the surf is excellent. Woohoo. Up tilted the plane and we were airborne. And chatting. Bonding like bankers and petro-chem execs on an all-expenses-paid business trip. Half expecting the trolley dollies – sorry, cabin crew – to crack out the bloody marys. What a laugh. Until smoke started pouring down from the ceiling.

Someone shouted: “Smoke!” I kept quiet. It was only smoke, after all. No need to cause a fuss. Someone else shouted: “Fire!”, which struck me as alarmist. I pressed the help button on the ceiling. No need to yell. I would notify the stewardess of our impending doom in the formal manner. Then buzzers sounded, lights went out and the crew started shouting: “Brace! Brace!” repeatedly, loudly, upsettingly. And we crashed.

etc...! 8)

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/u ... 907460.ece
 
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