Aviation Accidents

EnolaGaia

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EgyptAir crash: 'Debris found' from flight MS804

Debris from the missing EgyptAir flight has been found floating in the Mediterranean, officials say.

Flight MS804 was en route from Paris to Cairo with 66 passengers and crew when it vanished early on Thursday.

Egypt's army spokesman said wreckage and passenger belongings were found 290km (180 miles) from Alexandria.
...
SOURCE: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-36339614
 
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Probably. Was just comparing the incidents though.
Shouldn't the last few posts be in Aviation Accidents (or even a new thread), as they have nothing to do with MH370.
Some should but there is the comparative issue. I'll copy the relevant ones into Aviation Accidents. Thankfully it looks as if this wasn't a terrorist act.
 

Tribble

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Social media and the tabloids have been pointing out the "amazing" coincidence/conspiracy that, on Thursday (when MS804 disappeared) it had been 804 days since MH370 disappeared. (This calculation only works if you include the end date, otherwise it's 803 days)
 

Quake42

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Alarming reports yesterday that 57 people with airside clearance at Paris CDG are on terrorist watch lists! WTF?
 

Peripart

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It's our new inclusive society, dontcha know. We can't exclude these guys from the workforce just because of a few silly jihadist beliefs. Many of them have terribly low self-esteem - indeed, some are positively suicidal.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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"Thankfully it looks as if this wasn't a terrorist act."

Not so sure. The latest reports talk of multiple smoke alerts from the cabin before the aircraft disappeared. The Airbus is a very reliable aircraft not known for spontaneous combustion, which hints at some sort of incendiary or explosive device. Unfortunately the aircraft went down in one of the deepest parts of the Mediterranean, so recovering the flight recorders may prove difficult.
 

McAvennie

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Alarming reports yesterday that 57 people with airside clearance at Paris CDG are on terrorist watch lists! WTF?
I suspect this would be labelled Draconian or restriction of freedoms, but why not criminalize whatever the actions are that get you out on a watch list?

I assume it has to be more than just clicking on the wrong links online once or twice, so if you know who these people are and what they are doing then nip it in the bud before anything goes further.

All too often the perpetrators of these acts are known to have been on a watch list.
 
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"Thankfully it looks as if this wasn't a terrorist act."

Not so sure. The latest reports talk of multiple smoke alerts from the cabin before the aircraft disappeared. The Airbus is a very reliable aircraft not known for spontaneous combustion, which hints at some sort of incendiary or explosive device. Unfortunately the aircraft went down in one of the deepest parts of the Mediterranean, so recovering the flight recorders may prove difficult.
Sigh. Maybe I spoke too soon.
 

Quake42

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I suspect this would be labelled Draconian or restriction of freedoms, but why not criminalize whatever the actions are that get you out on a watch list?

I assume it has to be more than just clicking on the wrong links online once or twice, so if you know who these people are and what they are doing then nip it in the bud before anything goes further.

All too often the perpetrators of these acts are known to have been on a watch list.
With airport staff I think you can't take chances with this stuff. There should probably be positive vetting of some sort. Anyone with known sympathies to Islamist groups should never be allowed near an aeroplane.
 

Quake42

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That would see out the airport anyone who not born in the country of vetting I should imagine.
Not necessarily. It might pose problems for people who have lived as adults in countries without functioning law and order bureaucracies and/or appropriate trans-border agreements on infuriation sharing, but no more than that. Positive vetting, if done properly, would however hopefully identify people with extremist sympathies or dodgy associates.

I'm not going to shed too many tears if Islamists can't get jobs in airports tbh.
 

Yithian

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All too often the perpetrators of these acts are known to have been on a watch list.
Are security services only allowed to watch individuals on terrorist watch lists?

"We watched him travel to Yemen, we watched him come back, we watched him get a job at the airport, we watched him board a plane with a ticking suitcase..."

Fifty-seven people who are of interest to police hanging around planes?

Even accepting overzealous surveillance, that's staggering.
 

Monstrosa

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internal-blast-tore-right-side-of-egyptair-jetInternal blast 'tore right side' of EgyptAir jet, pilot says

Data from the final moments before EgyptAir flight MS804 crashed into the Mediterranean suggest an "internal explosion" tore through the right side of the aircraft, a pilot says.

Investigators trying to determine whether the Airbus A320 jet was brought down by terrorism or a technical fault are poring over a series of warnings indicating smoke filled the cabin shortly before it disappeared from radar.

French authorities confirmed yesterday that smoke detectors went off aboard the flight a few minutes before it crashed but said it was not clear what caused the smoke or fire.
 
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Not necessarily. It might pose problems for people who have lived as adults in countries without functioning law and order bureaucracies and/or appropriate trans-border agreements on infuriation sharing, but no more than that. Positive vetting, if done properly, would however hopefully identify people with extremist sympathies or dodgy associates.

I'm not going to shed too many tears if Islamists can't get jobs in airports tbh.
Depends on the level of the vetting. I've been through trying to get bona fides established for person not born in the UK and it's not easy. If those checks were for security reasons, the red flag would be up at the first obstacle. In the UK and some other Western countries, most people are well documented as are their parents and various addresses and employers. Once you're out of the UK the trail often goes 'vague' by our standards.

Positive vetting in those circumstances would probably automatically exclude anyone who can't prove who they are, who their parents are or even who they worked for. For first generation immigrants, that'd be a lot of them, through no fault of their own.
 

EnolaGaia

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Bigphoot2

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New York plane crash: WW2 aircraft in Hudson River
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Media captionAerial footage shows search vessels combing the Hudson River
A vintage World War Two aircraft has crashed in the Hudson River between New York and New Jersey.

The plane - a single-seat P-47 Thunderbolt - went down two miles (3.2km) south of George Washington Bridge.

Divers later recovered a body - believed to be that of the pilot - from the submerged plane.

The cause of the crash has not been confirmed, but engine failure has been cited as a possible cause.

The plane was among three aircraft that flew from an airfield in Farmingdale, east of New York City.

They were taking part in shooting a promotional video to mark the 75th anniversary of the American Airpower Museum.

The two other aircraft returned safely to the airfield.

College student Siqi Li saw the plane crash into the river.

"It made kind of a U-turn, and then there was a stream of smoke coming from it,'' he told New York's Daily News.

"It was tilting down toward the water. I thought they were doing some sort of trick."

In 2009, the pilot of an airliner with 155 passengers and crew made an emergency landing in the Hudson.

All those on board were later rescued in what later became known as the "Miracle on the Hudson".
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-36404322
 
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Accident averted?

Two pilots have been arrested on suspicion of being under the influence of alcohol as they prepared to fly a transatlantic passenger jet from Scotland to Canada.

Staff are understood to have raised concerns over the pilots’ behaviour before the Air Transat A310 took off carrying up to 250 passengers on board.

The Canadian airline’s plane was due to depart from Glasgow to Toronto on Monday afternoon, The Press Association reported.

Officers arrested the men on suspicion of being “impaired through alcohol” before they were due to take off at 1pm. ...

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/pilots-drunk-glasgow_uk_578dc798e4b069bdac5d2c8d
 

rynner2

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RAF helicopter fire on Snowdonia peak after technical issue

An RAF helicopter has burst into flames on a Snowdonia peak after being forced to land due to a technical problem.
All five people who were on board the training aircraft from RAF Valley on Anglesey have been reported safe and did not need hospital treatment.

Emergency services were called at about 13:45 BST to Yr Aran, a mountain peak on a ridge south of Snowdon. Walkers reported seeing 10ft-high (3m) flames.
An air ambulance was sent to the scene, along with a coastguard helicopter.
Firefighters, police and mountain rescue teams from Llanberis, Ogwen Valley and Aberglaslyn also made their way to the peak, while an air exclusion zone was put in place.

A Ministry of Defence (MoD) spokesman said the Griffin training helicopter "safely completed a precautionary landing in Snowdonia" following a technical issue.
"Everyone on board exited safely, subsequently the aircraft caught fire," he added.
The MOD said five people - four military and one civilian - were on the helicopter at the time, while another person involved in the training exercise was already on the ground.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency said it was called at 13:45 BST to reports by the air ambulance of a helicopter crash west of Snowdon.
"The helimed was in the area at the time of the crash and was immediately on scene," a spokesman said.

Huw Price, who was walking nearby when the helicopter caught fire, said: "We were walking up the path, just me and the dog, and I saw this helicopter flying in the valley below us.
"I assumed it was routine fly-by, it did not look like it was looking for anything.
"Then it went away and I just assumed it had flown off, but then I saw billowing black smoke."

Mr Price, who is on holiday in north Wales, said a walker who passed him said he had seen the helicopter land.
"There was no big bang, it must have just had some sort of issue. There was lots of smoke. It was high, thick, black smoke," he added.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-37023986
 

rynner2

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Luckily this was an incident rather than an accident:
'Reckless drone operator' in 'near miss' with Flybe flight
11 August 2016

A "reckless drone operator" is being sought by police after reports of a "near miss" between a drone and plane.
The Flybe passenger aircraft was flying at about 900ft (275m) and was about 2 miles (3km) from Cornwall Airport Newquay when it happened on Tuesday afternoon, police said.

Devon and Cornwall Police conducted a search of the area but have not found the drone or operator.
Insp Dave Meredith called it "an incredibly concerning incident".
"The close proximity of the drone to the passenger aircraft shows a complete disregard by the operator for public safety and we are appealing to the public for information to help us track down this reckless drone operator," Insp Meredith said.

A spokeswoman for Cornwall Airport Newquay confirmed a drone had flown within the air traffic zone adjacent to the final approach to the airport as the plane flew in from London Stansted carrying 62 passengers.
"Although on this occasion there was no danger of collision, Air Traffic Control (ATC) reported this incident to the police as the drone should not have been flown in that area without ATC clearance and posed a potential danger to incoming flights," she said.

A spokesperson for the UK Civil Aviation Authority said: "Airspace proximity incidents, whether involving two aircraft, or a drone and an aircraft, need to be fully investigated to establish the level of risk involved."
The UK Airprox Board, which investigates airspace proximity incidents, said it had not received any official report of the incident yet.

Flybe said it would "work closely" with all relevant authorities to help identify the perpetrators of any activity which could jeopardise passenger safety.

Operators of any small unmanned surveillance aircraft must not fly them within 50m (164 ft) of any vessel, vehicle or structure which is not under the user's control, unless they have obtained permission from the Civil Aviation Authority, according to the Air Navigation Order 2009.
Figures have shown there were more reported near misses between drones and aircraft over the UK in the first six months of 2016 than the whole of the previous year.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-37042796
 

rynner2

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Light aircraft crashes with two passengers in Perranporth
11 August 2016



A light aircraft has crashed with two passengers on board in Perranporth, Cornwall.
Cornwall Fire and Rescue said firefighters were called to the Piper Warrior plane at Trevellas Airfield at around 17:30 BST.

The South West Ambulance Service said one male and one female passenger had safely got out of the aircraft.
The pair and were taken to the Royal Cornwall Hospital with non-serious head injuries.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-37052355

The Cornishman adds:

Crews from Newquay, Truro, Tolvaddon and Wadebridge were all scrambled the to the scene.
Details are scarce, but firefighters say when they arrived they found the aircraft "well alight".

Cornwall Fire and Rescue said: "The aircraft, a Piper Warrior, had landed safely and it was confirmed that everyone was out of the aircraft. On arrival the plane was well alight.
"Firefighters used foam at the incident to extinguish the fire. Ambulances were in attendance."

http://www.cornishman.co.uk/two-peo...-perranporth/story-29610876-detail/story.html
 
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rynner2

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The 'puzzling' disappearance of an Indian military plane
Soutik Biswas Delhi correspondent

On 22 July, an Indian military plane with 29 people on board, including six crew members, went missing over the Bay of Bengal.
More than three weeks and a massive search operation later, there is no trace of the plane.
Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar says experts he's spoken to are "puzzled by the sudden disappearance" of the plane.

So what do we know about the plane so far?
The Antonov-32 transport aircraft took off from the southern city of Chennai (Madras) at 08:30 local time (03:00 GMT), for a three-hour flight to Port Blair, in the eastern archipelago of Andaman and Nicobar.
The plane climbed to a cruising altitude of 23,000ft (7,010m) over the sea before disappearing from air traffic control screens at approximately 09:12 local time, some 270km (167 miles) east of Chennai.

Seven to eight minutes before the aircraft vanished, the pilot said he was changing course to the right to avoid a thundershower cloud.
Records show it descended "very fast" from its cruising height and vanished from the radar. There was no distress call from the cockpit.
"It just disappeared - no SOS, no transmission at any frequency. That is the worrying part," says Mr Parrikar.
When it disappeared, the plane was on the fringes of an area of around 150-200 nautical miles where there was no radar coverage. Such "blind spots" over remote areas of land and sea are not uncommon.

The ongoing deep sea hunt for the missing plane, say officials, is possibly the biggest - and most arduous - in India's aviation history.
Air force and coast guard planes have flown more than 1,000 hours covering 360 nautical miles trying to locate debris.

Some some 30 ships - including two sophisticated ocean research vehicles loaned from India's top oceanographic institute and the Geological Survey of India - and submarines have combed more than 430 sq km in waters up to 4km deep. (This is around the same depth at which the flight data recorders from Air France Airbus plane that crashed into the Atlantic in 2009 were found after two years of search.)

All they have found are some 30 floating objects - mainly deep sea detritus and nothing remotely associated with the missing plane. Two dozen electronic transmissions picked up in the area came from other sources. Satellites have drawn a blank in picking up any signals from the plane.

The missing Antonov-32 is part of the air force's 100 or so strong fleet of the Russian-made aircraft, described as the workhorse of the force. These planes were inducted into the force between 1984 and 1991. Air force officers point to the reliability of the aircraft, saying it has been landing regularly at Daulat Beg Oldi, the world's highest airstrip, located in Ladakh.

Mr Parrikar says the missing plane had been upgraded, and flown for nearly 179 hours after that. The pilot had flown more than 500 hours on this route.
The plane was equipped with an emergency locator transmitter, a portable emergency locator transmitter which pilots activate in the cockpit and personal locator beacons, that are attached to life vests and dinghies. "We have been looking from signals from all three," says an official. "But we have received nothing."

But the aircraft was missing something crucial: the underwater locator beacons, or pingers, which are fitted to aviation flight recorders - cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder - and transmit signals at low-level frequencies from deep under water. They have a battery life of 30 days.

This appears to be a big chink in the armour of India's trusted transporter - none of the Antonov-32s were equipped with them. Since the plane vanished, the air force has been scrambling to put such beacons on these planes flying over the sea. Also, according to one report, the plane "reported three snags" in less than two weeks last month.

In the end, still nobody knows what happened to the plane. Did it fall out of air? Did it plunge into the sea? The minister believes there is very little possibility of sabotage.

But there's no reason to assume this will remain a mystery. The debris of a Dornier reconnaissance aircraft from the Indian Coast Guard which disappeared with two pilots and a navigator, on 8 June 2015 was recovered more than a month later after a vast search operation.
"It is like searching for a needle in a haystack. We are still hoping for a miracle," an air force official told me.

etc... (Photos, map and diagram on page)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-37081390
 

Cochise

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RAF helicopter fire on Snowdonia peak after technical issue

An RAF helicopter has burst into flames on a Snowdonia peak after being forced to land due to a technical problem.
All five people who were on board the training aircraft from RAF Valley on Anglesey have been reported safe and did not need hospital treatment.

Emergency services were called at about 13:45 BST to Yr Aran, a mountain peak on a ridge south of Snowdon. Walkers reported seeing 10ft-high (3m) flames.
An air ambulance was sent to the scene, along with a coastguard helicopter.
Firefighters, police and mountain rescue teams from Llanberis, Ogwen Valley and Aberglaslyn also made their way to the peak, while an air exclusion zone was put in place.

A Ministry of Defence (MoD) spokesman said the Griffin training helicopter "safely completed a precautionary landing in Snowdonia" following a technical issue.
"Everyone on board exited safely, subsequently the aircraft caught fire," he added.
The MOD said five people - four military and one civilian - were on the helicopter at the time, while another person involved in the training exercise was already on the ground.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency said it was called at 13:45 BST to reports by the air ambulance of a helicopter crash west of Snowdon.
"The helimed was in the area at the time of the crash and was immediately on scene," a spokesman said.

Huw Price, who was walking nearby when the helicopter caught fire, said: "We were walking up the path, just me and the dog, and I saw this helicopter flying in the valley below us.
"I assumed it was routine fly-by, it did not look like it was looking for anything.
"Then it went away and I just assumed it had flown off, but then I saw billowing black smoke."

Mr Price, who is on holiday in north Wales, said a walker who passed him said he had seen the helicopter land.
"There was no big bang, it must have just had some sort of issue. There was lots of smoke. It was high, thick, black smoke," he added.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-north-west-wales-37023986
My son saw that one. Other side of the valley, second peak along. (Foel Goch, I think - it's basically a long ridge) I was down in Essex at the time.
 

oldrover

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My son saw that one. Other side of the valley, second peak along. (Foel Goch, I think - it's basically a long ridge) I was down in Essex at the time.
Was it there then? I thought it was on the ridge that runs east from Glydr Fawr.

Edit. No, Yr Aran, the mountain behind Beddgelert. A little way down from Foel Goch. But you were a lot closer than I was.
 
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Cochise

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I wasn't here, only going by what my son said. But I think he only saw the smoke after it was down , so if it was Yr Aran it was further away than he thought.
 

rynner2

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Ejector seat maker to be prosecuted over Red Arrows pilot's death
Martin Baker Aircraft Ltd facing charge under the Health and Safety at Work Act after death of Sean Cunningham in 2011
Press Association
Monday 26 September 2016 14.40 BST

An ejector seat manufacturer is to be prosecuted over the death of a Red Arrows pilot at RAF Scampton in 2011.

The Health and Safety Executive said it would be prosecuting Martin Baker Aircraft Ltd for an alleged breach of health and safety law. The charges relate to the death of Flight Lieutenant Sean Cunningham at the base in Lincolnshire.

HSE inspector David Butter said: “We have conducted a thorough investigation and consider there is sufficient evidence and it is in the public interest to bring a prosecution.”

HSE investigated the incident following a Ministry of Defence inquiry, investigations by the civilian and military police and technical investigations involving the Military Aviation Authority and the Military Air Accident Investigation Branch.

Cunningham died after his ejector seat initiated during the pre-flight checks of his Hawk T1 jet while on the ground and stationary at the Lincolnshire airbase.

Martin Baker Aircraft Company Ltd, of Higher Denham near Uxbridge, will appear at Lincoln magistrates court, at a date to be confirmed, to face a section three charge under the Health and Safety at Work Act.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news...cuted-red-arrows-pilots-death-sean-cunningham
 

Krepostnoi

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There seems at first glance to be enough in the story of Eastern Airlines flight 980 for it to be better placed in a conspiracy theories thread, but I'm relatively confident it is also on-topic here. The quote below is quite sensational, but the full article is considerably more sober-minded, and well worth a few minutes of your time. It recounts what happened when two guys decide, on little more than a whim, to go and explore the crash site some 30 years after the event.

One of the more comprehensive explanations came from George Jehn, a former Eastern pilot who published a 2014 book about the crash called Final Destination: Disaster. In it he theorizes that a bomb went off, depressurized the plane, and sucked all the bodies out of the cabin. Then he speculates that either Eastern or the NTSB hired Bernardo Guarachi to get rid of the flight recorders as a way of halting further inquiry into the crash, for fear that a full investigation would have revealed that the airline was running drugs for President Ronald Reagan. It’s a convoluted plot, too far-fetched to take seriously, but seductive as hell to those looking to explain the inexplicable.

“Not one body, not one body part, no bloodstains. Why not?” Jehn said when we spoke in May. “It’s the single greatest aviation mystery of the 20th century.”

But the case of Flight 980 is about as cold as they come. Any remaining clues have been locked in the ice of a Bolivian glacier for decades. Trying to solve it would combine the dangers of high-altitude mountaineering with the long odds of treasure hunting—a losing hand almost every time.
 

rynner2

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Not an accident as such, but an incident:
British Airways jet diverted to Vancouver over 'sick crew'

A British Airways flight from San Francisco to London was diverted to Vancouver after members of the crew became ill, the airline says.
Twenty-five crew members went to local hospitals as a precaution but were later discharged, said BA spokeswoman Michele Kropf.
The crew were not treated for smoke inhalation as reported, she said.

The airline did not say what the cause of the problem was or what their symptoms were.
There has been no confirmation over how many people the Airbus A380 carried.
Images showed emergency vehicles surrounding the plane on the tarmac.

The flight departed at 19:13 on Monday (02:13 GMT) and landed in the Canadian city several hours later.
BA said passengers had been put up in hotels and would be rebooked on other flights.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-37761980
 
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