Aviation Accidents

rynner2

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The relatives of children killed in the Germanwings plane crash have demanded an apology from the airline's parent firm, Lufthansa, saying it ignored them and offered an "insulting" payout.
The letter from parents in Haltern, Germany, said Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr prioritised customers over them.

The airline said Mr Spohr had spoken with families. It has pledged to pay them up to €85,000 (£60,000; $93,000).
A Germanwings co-pilot is suspected of deliberately crashing the plane.
All 150 people aboard the Airbus 320, flying from Barcelona to Duesseldorf, were killed when the plane came down in March.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-33613680
Woman convicted of posing as Germanwings crash relative
Fraudster handed a year’s suspended jail sentence for posing as cousin of victim of last year’s plane crash and taking free flights
Agence France-Presse in Berlin
Wednesday 26 October 2016 17.32 BST

A woman has been given a year’s suspended jail sentence for posing as the cousin of a victim in last year’s Germanwings plane crash and obtaining compensation offered by the airline.

The woman pretended to be a relative of a teacher who was killed in the 24 March disaster in the French Alps. She travelled to France on two occasions – including once with her two children and a friend – at the expense of Lufthansa, the parent company of Germanwings.
The trips, which included several nights’ stay at a luxury hotel in Marseille, were worth more than €15,000 (£13,000).

Investigators found she had no links to the teacher at a school in the west German town of Haltern am See, from which 16 students and two teachers were killed in the crash.

The court in Cologne issued its ruling on Wednesday after hearing from the prosecutors, but it can still be overturned because the accused did not appear on medical grounds. If she rejects the verdict, she can request a new hearing, the court has said.

The disaster claimed the lives of 150 people, including that of the suicidal co-pilot Andreas Lubitz, who deliberately slammed the plane into the French mountainside.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/26/germanwings-crash-relative-german-court

What a greedy, selfish cow, to exploit a major tragedy for personal gain. :mad:
 

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Chicago O'Hare plane fire: American Airlines jet aborts take-off
Video

An American Airlines plane has caught fire on the runway of Chicago's O'Hare airport while taking off.
The Boeing 767 bound for Miami experienced an "uncontained engine failure", officials involved in the investigation said.
The pilot aborted the take-off and evacuated everyone on board via emergency chutes as black smoke billowed from the plane.

Twenty people suffered minor injuries, the fire department said.
Nine crew members and 161 passengers were on board.

A federal official quoted by the Associated Press news agency said the plane appeared to have suffered a rare and serious type of engine failure in which parts break off and are spewed outside the engine.
Passengers reported an explosion followed by flames and black smoke as the plane was speeding down the runway.

Sarah Ahmed said everyone on the right side of the plane rushed from their seats and moved to the left side.
"People are yelling, 'Open the door! Open the door!' Everyone's screaming and jumping on top of each other to open the door," she told WLS-TV.
"Within that time, I think it was seven seconds, there was smoke in the plane and the fire is right up against the windows, and it's melting the windows." :eek:
The incident took place at 14:35 local time (19:35 GMT).

An initial statement by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said the plane had burst a tyre, but that information was later deleted from the statement.
American Airlines said passengers who still wanted to travel had been put on another flight to Miami.

Elsewhere, a FedEx plane caught fire at Fort Lauderdale, Florida, airport after its landing gear collapsed on landing, the FAA said.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-37804736
 

rynner2

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Not an accident as such, but an incident:
British Airways jet diverted to Vancouver over 'sick crew'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-37761980
More info:

On Nov 1st 2016 the TSB reported that there was a strong obnoxious smell near the #4 main cabin door and upper flight deck galley. The crew consulted with dispatch and decided to divert to Calgary, but was subsequently notified that Calgary did not have the equipment needed to handle the A380, hence the crew decided to divert to Vancouver. The crew donned their oxygen masks and dumped fuel. The entire 25 crew and a passenger were taken to local hospitals for precautionary checks, 3 cabin crew and the passenger were affected by the fumes, all were released. The operator dispatched maintenance personnel as well as aircraft manufacturer’s support personnel to Vancouver, however, no source of the problem could be found. The aircraft positioned to London with only flight crew and maintenance personnel on board, however, despite system troubleshooting in flight no faults were found. The aircraft returned to service.

To read the full report click here

2nd November 2016

(Quote source) : “I was informed yesterday by one of your Operations Officers, Ms Irene Arthur, that the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) has decided not to investigate the inflight diversion of British Airways flight BA286, an Airbus A380-800 registered G-XLEB, which was operating San Francisco to London Heathrow and diverted into Vancouver last week. The crew stated to Air Traffic Control (ATC) using the call sign ‘Speedbird 6 Bravo’ they had toxic fumes. toxic gas like fumes.’ The relevant audio can be heard from time 03:07 at the following YouTube link:”

http://aerotoxic.org/news/accident-...6-treated-smoke-inhalation-av-herald-1-11-16/
 

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Chapecoense air crash: Pilot 'was warned over fuel'

The pilot of a charter plane that crashed in Colombia on Monday had been warned before taking off from an airport in Bolivia that he might not have enough fuel, a report says.
An airport official raised the concern after checking the plane's flight plan, Bolivia's Deber newspaper said.

Seventy-one people died in the crash, including members of a Brazilian football team. Six people survived.
Bodies of the victims are due to be repatriated to Brazil.

Colombian authorities have said evidence is growing that the British-made BAE 146 Avro RJ85 aircraft ran out of fuel as it tried to land at Medellin airport. Experts say it was flying at, or very near, its maximum range.
In a leaked tape, the pilot, Miguel Quiroga, can be heard warning of a "total electric failure" and "lack of fuel".

On Thursday, Bolivia's aviation authority suspended the operating licence of charter airline LaMia, which was part-owned by Mr Quiroga, and two other aviation officials.

In the report carried in Deber, the Bolivian airport authority official at Santa Cruz airport said she raised concerns that the plane's fuel load was only enough for the exact flight time.
The paper said she described how the airline's clerk, who died in the crash, had told her the pilot was confident he had enough fuel. Despite her concerns, the flight plan was passed on to Bolivian air control.

Bolivian officials have not yet commented on the report.

An earlier report carried by Brazil's O Globo newspaper suggested that because of a delayed departure, a refuelling stop in Cobija - on the border between Brazil and Bolivia - was abandoned because the airport did not operate at night.
The pilot had the option to refuel in Bogota, it said, but headed straight to Medellin.

The chief executive of LaMia, Gustavo Vargas, said on Wednesday that the plane should have had enough fuel for about four and a half hours and any decision to refuel was at the pilot's discretion.

In another development, the Colombian air traffic controller who received the distress call said she had received death threats following the crash.
"I did all that was humanly possible and technically necessary to preserve the lives of the passengers, but unfortunately my efforts weren't enough," Yaneth Molina wrote in a letter to her colleagues that was later released to the media.

On the approach to Medellin, the pilot had initially sought permission to land urgently but another plane was given priority because it had suffered a fuel leak. The LaMia flight was told to circle for seven minutes.

Meanwhile, coffins of the Brazilian victims are due to be flown out of Medellin on Friday.

The Brazilian team Chapecoense had been due to play a football cup final against Atletico Nacional in the city.
In the squad's home town of Chapeco, in southern Brazil, temporary structures have been set up in the football stadium for an open-air wake on Saturday.

Colombian officials say the plane's "black boxes", which record flight details, will be sent to the UK to be opened by investigators.
A full investigation into the crash is expected to take months.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-38178673

Map and photos on page. This sounds like a right cluster-fuck of errors.
 

rynner2

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Bolivia suspends licence of airline behind Colombia plane crash as it emerges pilot skipped crucial refuel stop
Oliver Griffin, Medellin
1 December 2016 • 8:15pm

Bolivia’s aviation authority has suspended the licence of the airline behind a disastrous plane crash that killed 71 people, as blame for the crash shifted to the pilot and co-owner of the airline for failing to make a refuel stop.

The charter flight from Bolivia to Colombia, which was carrying rising Brazilian football team Chapecoense, ended in tragedy after an apparent fuel shortage caused the plane to smash head first into the Andes near Colombia’s second city of Medellin.
Of the 77 people on board just six survived the impact, including three members of FC Chapecoense.

On Thursday, workers in the team's small Brazilian hometown of Chapeco erected temporary structures in the stadium to shelter the coffins of 51 victims expected to arrive back on Friday for an open-air wake. Some 100,000 fans, about half the city's population, are expected to attend.

Bolivia said on Thursday that it was immediately suspending airline LaMia's operation certificate, adding that the move implies no wrongdoing, as Colombian investigators said the crash might have resulted from lack of fuel on the plane.
Freddy Bonilla, secretary of airline security at Colombia's aviation authority, said investigators combing the crash site on a wooded hillside outside of Medellin found no traces of fuel in the wreckage of the BAe 146 made by Britain's BAE Systems Plc.

Experts said pilot Miguel Quiroga, the airline’s owner, missed opportunities to refuel while flying at the very limit of the BAE built jet’s range.
Gustavo Vargas, a director at LaMia, told Bolivian press that it was Captain Quiroga had decided to skip refuelling the aircraft in Colombian capital Bogota, choosing instead to fly directly to Jose Maria Cordova airport on the outskirts of Medellin.
“The pilot was the one who made the decision,” Mr Vargas said. “He thought the fuel would last.”

A leaked recording from Avianca co-pilot Juan Sebastián Upegui, who overheard the panicked conversation between Quiroga and air traffic control from his cockpit, revealed that the LaMia pilot requested an emergency landing due to a fuel shortage.
After being asked how much time the plane could stay in the air, Quiroga replied, “We have a fuel emergency, ma'am, that's why I am asking you [to land] at once […] I request an immediate descent.”

Shortly after the exchange, the pilot declared a “total electrical failure” and pleaded for navigational assistance before the plane crashed just 30 miles from the airport.
Freddy Bonilla, the air safety chief for Colombia’s civil aviation authority, said at a news conference that the plane was out of fuel at the moment of impact. This, he said, violated international rules requiring that aircraft maintain sufficient fuel in reserve when flying between airports.

Steven Draper, who flew a variant of the LaMia aircraft for British Airways over a period of 15 years, told the Telegraph: “If you are into your fuel reserve, it is a mayday […] you have to specify in the call that it is related to fuel, and how many minutes of flying time you have.”

Evidence suggests that Quiroga did not declare his emergency in time to the air traffic control team, or communicate how long the aircraft could remain in the air to the Colombian airport, causing the plane to crash.
...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...ence-airline-behindchapecoense-crash-emerges/
 

rynner2

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Glider pilot dies in smash as his aircraft crashes on Dartmoor
By WMNDavidWells | Posted: December 05, 2016

A glider pilot renowned for his airborne videos has died in a crash on Dartmoor.
The man, named locally as Matt Wright who has been described as an experienced pilot, died following the crash while flying at Dartmoor Gliding Society.
The incident happened on Sunday afternoon not far from Brentor on Dartmoor, about 20 miles from Plymouth.
Witnesses reported seeing the glider come down before crashing into the moorland.

Mr Wright, a father from Tiverton in Devon whose YouTube films have been views millions of times, had thousands of subscribers on his YouTube channel, which he ran under the name of Balleka.

He was well known in the gliding community and has been described as a popular flying enthusiast.
Many of the films he made as he soared through the skies above Dartmoor and across Devon have been viewed millions of times.

The accident is thought to have happened shortly after 1pm on Sunday, December 4, when emergency services were called to the scene.
Police said there were no suspicious circumstances but the Air Accident Investigation Branch has launched an investigation.
Today, Monday, investigators have been at the scene examining the wreckage.
...

Air Accidents Investigation Branch spokesperson said: "AAIB inspectors arrived late yesterday and their examination on site began early this morning.
"We expect them to be on site gathering evidence for the rest of today and into tomorrow. The wreckage will then be brought back to our facility in Farnborough for detailed examination as our investigation progresses."

Lisa Humphries, chairwoman of the Devon and Somerset Gliding Club, paid tribute to Mr Wright describing him as an "experienced pilot".
She said: "Matt Wright was a highly experienced pilot and friend to all of us at the Devon and Somerset Gliding Club.
"He was always full of energy and loved every aspect of aviation.
"Not only was he an expert glider pilot, but also an accomplished commercial Airline Captain, film maker and cartoonist.
"Our sincere condolences go to his family at this sad time."

etc...

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/gli...-on-dartmoor/story-29958719-detail/story.html

Flying photos and video on page. Regular YouTubers may well have come across Matt's videos already.
 

rynner2

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Chapecoense plane crash: Bolivia arrests LaMia airline boss

The authorities in Bolivia have arrested the head of the airline involved in a crash last week that killed 71 people, including most of the Brazilian football team, Chapecoense.
Gustavo Vargas, a retired air force general, has been detained as part of an investigation into the crash.
The plane, operated by the tiny LaMia airline, was taking the team to Colombia when it ran out of fuel.

A Bolivian official says she warned the pilot of the problem before departure.
The official, Celia Castedo, has now sought asylum in Brazil, saying she suffered threats and abuse.

Chapecoense were travelling to the city of Medellin to play the first leg of the Sudamericana Cup final against Atletico Nacional.

The British-made Avro RJ85 aircraft ran out of fuel as it approached the airport in Medellin on 28 November.
In a leaked tape, the pilot, Miguel Quiroga, can be heard warning of a "total electric failure" and "lack of fuel".

A Bolivian official, Celia Castedo, says she warned Mr Quiroga before departure that the long flight between southern Bolivia and Medellin was at the limit of the plane's maximum range.
She has now sought asylum in Brazil, saying she is being persecuted. [?]

Her asylum process could take a year to be processed, the authorities in Brazil said.
Bolivian Government Minister Carlos Romero urged the Brazilian authorities to turn her back.
"What she has done is very serious," he said. "It's a way of escaping the judicial system."

Six people survived the crash. One of them, crew member Erwin Tumuri, said an initial stop for refuelling in the northern Bolivian city of Cobija had been dropped by the pilot.
There was no warning to the crew or the passengers that the plane was facing electrical or fuel problems, Mr Tumuri told Brazil's Globo TV.

LaMia was originally registered in Venezuela, before moving its headquarters to Bolivia. It only had three planes, but only two of them were operational.
The plane had been chartered by Chapecoense for the biggest match in the club's history, against Atletico Nacional.

...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-38231774
 

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Bin Laden crash pilot 'suffering from mental overload'

A pilot may have been suffering from "mental overload" when he crash-landed, killing three members of Osama Bin Laden's family, an inquiry has found.
The jet overshot the runway at Blackbushe Airport in July 2015 and crashed into a car auction site.
The Air Accidents Investigations Branch (AAIB) said emergency warnings prior to landing may have "saturated the pilot's mental capacity".

The pilot and three passengers survived the crash but died in a severe fire.
Bin Laden's half-sister, Sana Mohammed Bin Laden, her mother, Raja Bashir Hashim, and his brother-in-law, Zuhair Hashim, were killed, along with pilot Mazen Al-Aqeel Da'jah Salem.

The AAIB report said the private Saudi-registered Phenom 300 jet, travelling from Milan, Italy, landed at high speed and touched down on 31 July 2015 with only 438m (1,437 ft) of runway remaining.
It collided with an earth bank before crashing into a British Car Auctions site, losing one of its wings and bursting into flames among parked cars.
Airport firefighters, who arrived on the scene within five minutes, were unable to control an "intense" blaze involving leaking fuel.
Eyewitnesses at the scene said there had been a "ball of flames" and "several explosions".

The AAIB said the three passengers appeared to have made an unsuccessful attempt to open the cabin door.
The report said the 57-year-old Jordanian pilot may have become "fixated on landing" because of "a very high workload situation" in the final minutes of the flight.
He made an emergency climb to avoid colliding with a microlight, and then came close to a second light aircraft.
The jet then began "a very high-speed descent", dropping at up to 3,000ft per minute.

The pilot ignored six "pull up" warnings from the aircraft's Terrain Avoidance and Warning System (TAWS), touching down at a speed of about 135 knots (155mph).
The AAIB said the 66 messages and alarms in the final three-and-a-half minutes of the flight may have created "audio overload" and "mental stressors".
"It is possible that in these circumstances the pilot... fixated on his initial strategy (landing) and lacked the mental capacity to recognise that the approach had become unstable," the report said.

Following the crash, the jet's operators have installed co-pilots on all Phenom 300 flights.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-38238883
 

rynner2

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Flying off somewhere for the hols? Perhaps you'd better not read this...

Thousands of airline pilots flying every day with suicidal thoughts, says landmark study
Henry Bodkin
15 December 2016 • 6:53am

More than 4,000 commercial flights on any given day are being flown by pilots who have experienced suicidal thoughts, a landmark study on the airline industry suggests.
An international survey of pilots by Harvard University found 4.1 per cent had contemplated killing themselves at least once in the previous fortnight, and 12.6 per cent met the criteria for depression.
Pilots diagnosed with acute depression are automatically deemed unfit to fly, but experts have warned many cover up their symptoms for fear of losing their careers.

The study was conducted in the wake of the 2015 Germanwings tragedy, when a pilot suspected of being mentally ill deliberately crashed his airliner into the French Alps, killing 150 people.
Its authors said there is a “veil of secrecy” surrounding mental health problems in the cockpit

Last night, however, Britain’s pre-eminent psychiatrist said screening for depression would be pointless as diagnosis would rely on pilots being honest.
“We found that many pilots currently flying are managing depressive symptoms, and it may be that they are not seeking treatment due to the fear of negative career impacts,” said Professor Joseph Allen, who led the research.

Depression, which affects people’s ability to concentrate and process information, can present as a feeling of failure or listlessness and loss of interest in the task at hand.

The new study, which is published in the journal Environmental Health, is significant because most existing data on depression is held by airlines and aviation authorities but is largely kept private.
Almost 3,500 pilots responded to the anonymous Harvard survey, although of these more than 1,100 refused to answer questions relating to mental health.
A greater proportion of male than female pilots reported they had experiences “nearly every day” of loss of interest, feeling like a failure and thinking they would be better off dead.
However, female pilots were more likely to have been diagnosed with depression.

The study also found a link between depression and higher usage of sleep aid medication.

Professor Sir Simon Wessely, President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said the routine banning of pilots with a history of depression “will not make the skies safer” because it would further discourage people to reveal their symptoms.
“Pilots need to know that if they admit to a mental health problem, provided they cooperate and recover, their careers will continue.
“Most people with depression do get better.”
He added: “I would be perfectly happy to be flown by a pilot who was on antidepressants, providing it was known about and he or she was being monitored.”

Rob Hunter, head of flight safety at the British Airline Pilots’ Association, called for pilots to be routinely insured against being forced to give up flying due to poor mental health, a recommendation of the Germanwings investigation.
“Like so many other areas of flight safety, changing the culture is difficult, but necessary,” he said.
“We need to foster an atmosphere of support and understanding, and pilots need to feel able to come forward without fear.”

Andreas Lubitz, the Germanwings co-pilot, had received treatment for suicidal tendencies and been declared unfit to work by his doctor.
But strict German medical confidentiality rules prevented this information being shared with the airline.

Professor Wessely said British doctors, by contrast, are able to breach patient confidentiality in extreme circumstances and would be expected to in the case of a suicidal pilot.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...line-pilots-flying-suicidal-thoughts-harvard/
 

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Sydney helicopter crash: four people including three-year-old emerge unscathed
Helicopter forced to make emergency landing in thick scrub near Bundeena after engine malfunctioned
Elle Hunt
Saturday 17 December 2016 03.14 GMT.

Four people, including a child, have been winched to safety in a dramatic rescue following a helicopter crash-landing in bushland near Sydney.

The helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing in the Royal National Park near Bundeena, 30km south of Sydney, on Saturday morning. Four people were onboard, including a three-year-old boy, all related to the pilot.
All were unharmed in the crash, and winched out by the Westpac life rescue helicopter and flown to Bundeena.

Rescue helicopter spokesman Steve Leahy said the small helicopter had been flying off the coast of southern Sydney just after 10am when its engine malfunctioned.
The pilot was able to direct the aircraft back to land and it made an emergency landing in thick scrub, about 1km from Jibbon Beach.
The rescue helicopter was alerted to the crash by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.

Leahy said the helicopter was “pretty much covered by that thick scrub”. A rescue crew officer “had to crawl on hands and knees to the accident site”.
All four people had only minor injuries including cuts and abrasions. They were flown to an assembly area at Bundeena where they received medical attention. The pilot was assisting police.

Leahy said they were “very lucky indeed”.
“The pilot’s just done an incredible job ... the worst-case scenario is there’s potential, if the pilot had been inexperienced, that the helicopter could have crashed into the ocean. It could have been a fatal accident ... however, this pilot has shown amazing skill and been able to save the lives of everyone onboard.”

https://www.theguardian.com/austral...ple-including-three-year-old-emerge-unscathed

What a relief no lives were lost. That family will be able to enjoy Christmas all the more now!
 

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Accident averted? Korean Airlines make a pig's ear trying to restrain a passenger.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-38388451

American singer Richard Marx has said he had to restrain a fellow passenger on a Korean Air flight, after the man allegedly attacked others onboard.

The incident happened as Marx and his wife, Daisy Fuentes, were travelling from Hanoi to Seoul on Tuesday.

The man was arrested upon landing and South Korean police said he was drunk, reported Yonhap news agency.

Marx called the incident "chaotic and dangerous" and alleged the crew were "completely ill trained"....
 

GNC

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Good to know someone's right here waiting for troublemakers.
 

rynner2

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Russian military plane crashes in Black Sea near Sochi

A Russian military plane with 91 people on board has crashed into the Black Sea, Russia's defence ministry says.
The plane disappeared from radar 20 minutes after taking off from the resort of Sochi at 05:20 (02:20 GMT) and fragments have now been found.

The defence ministry said the Tu-154 was carrying service personnel, members of the famed Alexandrov military band and reporters.
The plane was flying to Syria's Latakia province.

The defence ministry said in a statement: "Fragments of the Tu-154 plane of the Russian defence ministry were found 1.5km from the Black Sea coast of the city of Sochi at a depth of 50 to 70 metres."

Ministry spokesperson Igor Konashenkov said the plane was carrying passengers to a New Year's performance for Russian troops deployed in Syria.

Who are the Alexandrov Ensemble?
  • Alexandrov Ensemble is the official choir of the Russian armed forces
  • Known as the Red Army Choir, it was founded in 1928 during the Soviet era
  • The group also includes an orchestra and dancers
  • It takes its name from its first director, Alexander Vasilyevich Alexandrov, who wrote the music to the National Anthem of the Soviet Union
  • Listen to the Alexandrov Ensemble here
The performance was scheduled to take place at Russia's Hmeimim air base, near Latakia.

Russia has been carrying out air strikes in support of Syrian government forces who are battling rebels opposed to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-38430164

Another 91 deaths on the 2016 tally...
 

rynner2

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Turkish cargo plane from Hong Kong crashes into Kyrgyzstan homes
Video of crash site.

A Turkish cargo plane flying from Hong Kong has crashed in Kyrgyzstan, killing at least 32 people, most of them on the ground, officials say.

The Boeing 747 TC-MCL aircraft crashed as it was landing amid fog at Manas airport, about 25km (15 miles) north of the capital, Bishkek.
At least 15 buildings were destroyed and a number of children were reported to be among the dead.
Flight TK6491 was to have stopped at Manas en route to Istanbul in Turkey.

The plane belonged to Turkish cargo carrier ACT, which flies under the name MyCargo.
It said in a statement: "Our TC-MCL signed plane, flying on January 16 from Hong Kong to Bishkek, crashed on landing at Bishkek at the end of the runway for an unknown reason."
It said it was still awaiting "clear information".

The plane came down shortly after 07:30 local time (01:30 GMT) in the village of Dacha-Suu, a popular holiday home area.
Visibility was poor at the time because of freezing fog, but the cause of the crash has not yet been confirmed. The plane is believed to have been around 14 years old.

Images of the crash site show fire and smoke rising from the rubble of destroyed buildings.
One witness told AFP news agency: "The plane crashed into the houses. It killed entire families. There's nothing left of the houses. Many people were sleeping."
There were initial reports that one crew member had survived but later reports merely spoke of one missing pilot.
There were at least four people on board, officials said. A number of people have been taken to hospital with injuries.

A spokesman for the country's emergency services, Muhammed Svarov, told AFP the death toll "could be bigger" and that "major work is under way" to search for survivors.
Prime Minister Sooronbai Jeenbekov and local emergency services are at the scene.
President Almazbek Atambayev has cancelled a visit to China, Kyrgyz media reported.

Manas airport, the country's main international airport, has been closed.
In 2008, a passenger plane bound for Iran crashed shortly after take-off from Manas, killing 68 people.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-38633526

Photos and map on page.
 

rynner2

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An incident, rather than an accident:
Pilot blacked out on flight to Ireland, investigation reveals
By LBarton | Posted: January 22, 2017

A co-pilot blacked out at the controls, causing the aircraft to roll, during a flight from the Westcountry to Dublin, an inquiry has revealed.

A safety investigation report into the Flybe aircraft incident has been published by the Air Accident Investigation Unit Ireland.
It found the Bombardier Q400 plane rolled about 18 degrees just before its descent into the Irish capital on April 27 last year.
The pilot took control and the aircraft landed safely some 20 minutes later. There were no injuries. There were 33 passengers and four crew on board.

The report said: "On a scheduled passenger flight, shortly before descent into Dublin, the co-pilot began to feel unwell and requested to leave the flight deck for a few minutes.
"Before the co-pilot left his seat, the commander felt an unexpected aircraft upset in the form of a yaw and roll to the left. The co-pilot, who had become incapacitated, had inadvertently made an input to the left rudder pedal.
"The commander returned the aircraft to normal flight and the aircraft landed without further incident. There were no injuries."

Explaining how the 35-year-old pilot took control of the situation, the investigators added: "The commander disconnected the autopilot, restored a wings level condition and retarded the engine power to maintain a stable descent.
"He then tried to ascertain what had caused the unexpected aircraft upset.
"Simultaneously, the senior cabin crew member called the flight deck to see if all was okay and the commander told her to standby. Asking the co-pilot for his opinion, the commander then realised that the co-pilot was unwell.
"The commander stated that the co-pilot had become incapacitated and was not responsive to verbal communication or physical stimulation for a period of less than one minute."

Having ensured that the aircraft was on a safe flight path, the pilot called the cabin crew for assistance.
He then made an urgent call to Dublin Air Traffic Control, informing them of the incapacitated pilot and requesting priority for an approach to the runway.

The senior cabin crew member joined him on the flight deck and gave assistance to the co-pilot. They ensured that the co-pilot's seat was moved back from the controls and that his harness was locked.
He gradually recovered and was able to converse approximately five minutes after falling ill. He did not take any further part in the flight and declined therapeutic oxygen.

With only one crew member left in the cabin, a passenger was briefed and occupied the cabin crew seat at the rear of plane during landing.

Emergency services were waiting when the plane landed and paramedics immediately attended to the co-pilot while passengers remained on board. He was taken to hospital as a precaution and kept in overnight for observation.

etc...

http://www.cornwalllive.com/pilot-b...tion-reveals/story-30077751-detail/story.html
 
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Research into why we remember some aviation disasters and forget others
April 5, 2017 in Other Sciences / Social Sciences

Oxford University researchers have tracked how recent aircraft incidents or accidents trigger past events and how some are consistently more memorable than others. Using the English version of Wikipedia, they analysed articles about airline crashes that occurred between 2008 and 2016. They then measured how the traffic to articles about airline crashes or incidents before 2008 changed due to more recent events. They analysed page views of nearly 85,000 pairs of articles (which they named as "source articles" and "target articles") and found there was a short-term attention span for recent crashes. More people appeared to look at articles about past crashes they remembered when their memory was triggered by the recent event.

Their mathematical model, presented in the article, allows the researchers to find, for example, that the case of the co-pilot who in 2015 deliberately crashed a plane on a German flight, led to three times more views of a 'target' article about an incident in 2001 in New York in which pilot error played a part. The researchers' model shows that, on average, when target events from the past are combined, they attract 142 percent more page views than articles about the original source events.

The researchers also discovered that interest slumps to near zero in articles about aircraft incidents that happened more than 45 years ago. In their research paper, they explain this could be because people who were adults at the time have since died, forgotten about the event or, if still living, simply do not use Wikipedia.

Generally, air crashes that happened in the same location did not appear to be linked in the public's collective memory, says the study. This is despite a previous study, also based on page views of Wikipedia articles, showing public interest in individual crashes was determined by where the plane came down. ...

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-aviation-disasters.html
 
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German airlines are dropping safety rules brought in after the 2015 Germanwings plane crash which require two people in the cockpit at all times.

Andreas Lubitz killed 150 people by crashing the plane - apparently on purpose - after the plane's captain left to use the toilet.

Airlines now say the two-person rule has no safety benefits.

Eurowings, which merged with the Germanwings brand, is one of the airlines now dropping the requirement.

The German airline association BDL announced the change, which will come into effect by 1 June, on its website. It said its airlines will be re-introducing their original cockpit safety procedures.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-39749803?ocid=socialflow_twitter
 

rynner2

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Severe turbulence leaves 15 in hospital as plane passengers 'suffer broken bones and internal bleeding' after being hurled around cabin
Reuters, Associated Press
1 May 2017 • 12:03pm

At least 27 people were injured, several with suspected spinal damage, on an Aeroflot flight from Moscow to Bangkok on Monday when their Boeing 777 hit an air pocket.

Most of the injured - including a one-year-old child - were Russian. Fifteen of them were taken to a Bangkok hospital for treatment, the Russian embassy in Bangkok said in a statement. The other three injured were from Thailand.

A video posted online by Evgenia Zibrova, apparently shot in the aftermath of the turbulence, showed passengers scattered along the aisle of the aircraft.
Food and drinks, including several bottles of fizzy drinks, had apparently been hurled from the trolley and were sprawled across the floor.

Posting the video, Ms Zibrova wrote: "Numerous air pockets one hour before landing led to broken bones, internal and external bleeding.
"Babies are covered in bruises, people lost consciousness. Thanks that we are still alive. Aeroflot, please help these people."

The Russian airline said in an earlier statement that several passengers had been injured during "severe turbulence" 40 minutes before landing in the Thai capital.
It said the crew was unable to warn passengers of the approaching danger as the turbulence occurred in a clear sky.

"All the injured were sent to a local hospital with injuries of a different kind of severity, mainly fractures and bruises," the embassy said.
"The reasons behind the injures was that some of the passengers had not had their seatbelts fastened."

etc...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...rt-severe-turbulence-strikes-aeroflot-flight/
 

rynner2

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Last Sea Vixen plane , 'Foxy Lady', performs emergency landing
Telegraph Reporters
29 May 2017 • 1:48am

A pilot had a lucky escape after the last remaining Sea Vixen plane did an emergency landing at an airfield in Somerset on Saturday.
The pilot walked away uninjured after the aircraft, known as the Foxy Lady, did a "belly-landing" on return to its base in Yeovilton.

Scott Dabinett, 32, captured amazing photos of the incident, which saw the pilot make an impressive landing without landing gear after flying back from the Duxford Air Show in Cambridgeshire.
He said: "As soon as we saw the pilot was OK we all started breathing again. Everyone was shaking. The emergency guys were on the scene straight away and took control of the situation."

Mr Dabinett said the aircraft had taken off at 4.15pm and they waited one hour and 10 minutes for it to return.

He added: "The aircraft returned from Duxford and flew up the runway. We then heard radio communications between the tower and the pilot asking for visual of the landing gear.
"The response was your undercarriage is clean, which means it is still up. After several more passes and discussion between pilot and tower and other emergency personnel, it was soon announced that this was going to be a gear-up belly landing.

"The feeling between the few of us standing by was that this does not look good. On the final approach we all crossed our fingers and held our breaths whilst pointing our cameras at the Sea Vixen. As soon as she touched the runway the canopy was released and engines were shut down.
"She slid up the runway very smoothly and under control. It was much quieter than I was expecting. Eventually she came to a stop. We kept waiting for movement from the pilot."

Sea Vixen XP924 "Foxy Lady" is operated by Fly Navy Heritage Trust Navy Wings.
It first flew on September 23, 1963 and was delivered to 899 Squadron at RNAS Yeovilton on December 18, 1963.
Retirement from active service sent her to Royal Naval Aircraft Yard at Belfast in August 1971.
The aircraft was gifted to Naval Aviation Ltd in September 2014 and now operates from the Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton.

The Sea Vixen is an unusually configured aircraft that first flew in 1951. It was the first British two-seat aircraft to break the sound barrier when it achieved Mach speed in a dive during its operational testing phase in the early 1950's.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...n-plane-foxy-lady-performs-emergency-landing/

Photos on page.
 
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