Aviation Accidents

Cochise

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Given the way the 'copter goes into a spin its very likely that the tail rotor failed. Not a good way to die.
 

ChrisBoardman

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Re the recent helicopter crash look carefully at 44 to 48 secs below the helicopter just before it goes into the spin, you will see a very fast flash going right to left below the aircraft, a blade from the tail rotor maybe?
It's only momentary and moving very fast maybe only in one or two frames but it's there.


Well spotted.
 

ChrisBoardman

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Turn out that if the tail rotor breaks when you have 130mph forward momentum you can fight it but with no forward momentum you can do nothing.
 

EnolaGaia

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A near accident, and a (thankfully) missed opportunity for a strange disappearance story ...

Sleeping pilot overflies Australian island destination
A commercial pilot is under investigation after falling asleep in the cockpit of a freight plane and overflying his Australian island destination by 46 kilometers (29 miles) ...

The pilot, who has not been identified, was the only person aboard the twin-propeller Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain and was flying on autopilot during the early morning flight on Nov. 8 from Devonport city on Tasmania 250 kilometers (155 miles) northwest to King Island in Bass Strait ...

The pilot “unintentionally fell asleep while in command of the aircraft,” the Melbourne-based airline said.

“The issue became apparent when air traffic control was unable to contact the pilot in-flight, and the aircraft traveled past the intended destination point while operating on autopilot,” the statement said. ...

The pilot landed safely on King Island, Vortex Air said. ...

Vortex Air said the 6:20 a.m. flight had been the first on the pilot’s first day back at work after taking leave. He continued flying that day.

The newspaper said the pilot reported for duty despite having had little or no sleep the previous night due to a personal crisis.
SOURCE: https://www.apnews.com/49ad75212fa145acbba1986302f79e88
 
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I guess this counts as an aviation accident.

Plane stupid: Man is 'hit by light aircraft wing' after recording its takeoff while standing on the runway
  • Onlooker tried to film takeoff at Turmalina Park in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil
  • Small plane's left wing is knocked out of place after apparently hitting the man
  • He was taken to hospital with minor injuries; believed to have some broken ribs
By NICK ENOCH FOR MAILONLINE

PUBLISHED: 15:39, 25 January 2019 | UPDATED: 15:45, 25 January 2019

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ing-runway.html?ito=social-twitter_mailonline
 

blessmycottonsocks

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cycleboy2

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A bit suspicious that the colonel rules out anti-malarial drugs. Some brands have caused just that sort of strange behaviour.
A good friend of mine who's travelled in Asia a lot stopped taking anti-malarial drugs as he was having delusions. He knows the danger of malaria (and he's had dengue fever so he knows the dangers of mosquito-borne diseases) but he felt that was the safer of the two options. When I read about the Alana Cutland case that thought never occurred to me, and it's almost as if the Colonel's ruling them out before actually confirming whether they were being taken. I've just looked at the NHS website and it says there's a high risk of malaria through the whole of Madagascar all-year round, so there's a pretty good chance that she was taking something...
 

RaM

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She did well to manage to get the door open far enough to jump out,
If it was like the Cessnas I have flown in the door can come open but
it will usually only open a inch or two and is quite difficult to open further,
I had one come open during aerobatics and once open I could not pull it
closed, so tied to push it further open to get a swing at it so to speak, took
quite a lot of strength to get it closed. the aircraft I flew in were stressed for
aerobatics and had a handle in front of the door this pulled the hinges out
of the door so the door could then be jettisoned in emergency but I don't
know if this is fitted to other models,
 
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Strewth! Accident avoided.

A student pilot in Australia safely landed a light aircraft during a flying lesson, after his instructor passed out at the controls.

Western Australian man Max Sylvester made a distress call to air traffic control about an hour into his flight on Saturday when his teacher collapsed beside him.

Operators at an airport in Perth helped him guide the aircraft to the ground.

Mr Sylvester was later praised for his quick response and composure.

In his emergency call, a recording of which was later made public, he describes his teacher's condition before taking instructions on flying the plane.

"I'm trying to keep him up but he keeps falling down," he tells the operator.

When asked if he knows how to operate the Cessna aircraft, he replies: "This is my first lesson."

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-49547179
 

Tribble

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This could have been very, very messy...

Two freefalling parachutists nearly collided in mid-air with two US fighter planes travelling at almost 350mph (560km/h), a report has revealed.
The skydivers recorded the aircraft pass under them on a helmet camera as they fell at 120mph (190km/h).
The pilots from RAF Lakenheath should have been told by air traffic control the Cambridgeshire parachute site was active, said the UK Airprox Board.


https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-49664560
 

Tribble

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A small plane has been left dangling upside down after getting entangled in ski lift cables in the Italian Alps.
Dramatic pictures were released by Italian mountain rescuers following the crash in Prato Valentino on Sunday.
The pilot had light injuries after being thrown out of the plane. He is now being treated in hospital, the rescuers say.
The only passenger on board the plane was unharmed.


https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49987780
 
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I guess this counts as an accident.

Four teachers are suing Delta Air Lines after one of its aircraft dumped fuel over schools as it made an emergency landing.

The flight was forced to return to Los Angeles International Airport because of engine problems. Delta confirmed the plane had dumped the fuel to reduce its landing weight. Nearly 60 people were treated at six local schools, many of them children. The four teachers are now seeking unspecified damages over the incident.

"The plaintiffs could feel the fuel on their clothes, their flesh, their eyes and their skin," a lawyer for the teachers said, adding that the fuel "penetrated their mouths and noses as well, producing a lasting and severe irritation".

Aviation rules say that planes can dump fuel in emergency landings, but only over designated areas and at a high altitude.

On Wednesday, the FAA said the crew had released the fuel without telling air traffic control.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-51162248
 

INT21

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I would think that the crew had enough on their minds getting the plane back on the ground.

You find pricks like these teachers every time there may be some money to be made.

Had the plane crashed and burned on landing, would they have made the same claim ?

Some people suffered a rash. It will pass. NO one was seriously hurt.

INT21.
 

EnolaGaia

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I guess this counts as an accident. ...
I think it does ... I've been following this story, and it's clear someone screwed up big-time.

There's no doubt the airliner had to dump fuel before attempting a come-around and landing. It's standard procedure, and it's absolutely mandatory if the fully laden aircraft exceeds its safe landing fuel load limit.

The cockpit crew reported they had power and control, so ATC had no reason to panic.

Furthermore, ATC asked the pilot if he needed to dump fuel, and he responded that he didn't. That's recorded on the ATC radio transcription.
 

INT21

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Possibly the crew didn't know how long they would have control and just wanted back as soon as possible. Had the crew put it to a vote among the passengers I have no doubt how they would have voted.

Odd though that the ATC remark regarding fuel dumping doesn't seem to tie in with the actual fact.
 

INT21

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EnolaGaia

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See what I mean now ? ...
There's no conflict. The ATC voice recording demonstrates the pilot was asked if a fuel dump was required. He said no. He dumped fuel anyway, and the FAA quickly (and correctly) concluded he'd done so without advising the ATC he needed to or had done so (at any time from initial contact through landing).
 

maximus otter

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Four teachers are suing Delta Air Lines after one of its aircraft dumped fuel over schools as it made an emergency landing.

"The plaintiffs could feel the fuel on their clothes, their flesh, their eyes and their skin," a lawyer for the teachers said, adding that the fuel "penetrated their mouths and noses as well, producing a lasting and severe irritation".
“JP-8 is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons used as a multipurpose fuel for commercial aircraft, as well as ground vehicles, generators, heaters and stoves.

JP-8 and other kerosene-based fuels have been shown to cause skin irritation, skin sensitization and even skin tumors with repeated or prolonged contact.

Treatment primarily involves removal of the offending agent by washing with a gentle soap and water.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2729226/

The horror!

maximus otter
 

RaM

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This is a pic of a Lufthansa 747 dumping fuel over our village, it had been dumping all the way
down the West coast and was still dumping on the approach to Manchester, don't know what
the emergency was but they wanted on the ground quick.

 
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“JP-8 is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons used as a multipurpose fuel for commercial aircraft, as well as ground vehicles, generators, heaters and stoves.

JP-8 and other kerosene-based fuels have been shown to cause skin irritation, skin sensitization and even skin tumors with repeated or prolonged contact.

Treatment primarily involves removal of the offending agent by washing with a gentle soap and water.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2729226/

The horror!

maximus otter
Teachers are just as bad as farmers, always have the paw out out looking for handouts.
 
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