Back From The Dead (People)

sherbetbizarre

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#91
'Dead' boy wakes up and asks for water at funeral in Brazil

Kelvin Santos pronounced dead in hospital, given to family
Father says he sat up in coffin, asked for water, died again
Family delayed funeral in hope, but later buried Kelvin


A TWO-YEAR-OLD boy sat up in his coffin and asked for water before laying back down again lifeless, according to a Brazilian news website.

Website ORM claimed that Kelvin Santos stopped breathing during treatment for pneumonia at a hospital in Belem, northern Brazil.

He was declared dead at 7.40pm on Friday and his body was handed over to his family in a plastic bag.

The child's devastated family took him home where grieving relatives held a wake throughout the night, with the boy's body laid in an open coffin.

But an hour before his funeral was due to take place on Saturday the boy apparently sat up in his coffin and said: "Daddy, can I have some water?".

The boy's father, Antonio Santos, said: "Everybody started to scream, we couldn't believe our eyes. Then we thought a miracle had taken place and our boy had come back to life.

"Then Kelvin just laid back down, the way he was. We couldn't wake him. He was dead again."

Mr Santos rushed his son back to the Aberlardo Santos hospital in Belem,where the doctors reexamined the boy and confirmed that he had no signs of life.

He said: "They assured me that he really was dead and gave me no explanation for what we had just seen and heard."

The boy's family decided to delay the funeral for an hour in the hope that he would wake up again, but ended up burying him at 5pm that day in a local cemetery.

Convinced that his son was victim of medical malpractice, Mr Santos has now registered a complaint with the police who have launched an investigation

He said: "Fifteen minutes after rushing him away for resuscitation, they came and told me he was dead and handed me his body. Perhaps they didn't examine him properly. Dead people don't just wake up and talk. I'm determined to find out the truth."

The local state department today confirmed the boy had been admitted to hospital in a critical condition and was declared dead after suffering cardiac-respiratory failure.
LINK

Plus original Brazilian link -
http://www.orm.com.br/2009/noticias/def ... modulo=197
 
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#92
Good news, the baby is released from hoospital.

Argentine morgue baby leaves hospital

September 6th, 2012 in Other

Argentina's "miracle baby," born premature and declared dead in April and then found alive 12 hours later at the morgue, has been cleared to go home, the hospital said Thursday.

Luz Milagros, whose middle name means "miracles" in Spanish, "is stable," with a tube for feeding and respiratory assistance "to help avoid fatigue," said the director of Resistencia's pediatric hospital, Juan Mario Jacobassi.

The five-month-old left the hospital in northeastern Argentina around noon, in the arms of her mother Analia Boutet.

She remains fragile, and her care will continue at home with the help of specialized equipment installed there.

Born on April 3, some three months before her due date, Luz Milagros weighed around 780 grams (1.7 pounds).

Doctors examined her and determined she was stillborn.

But 12 hours later, when the parents went to the morgue to see the body and say goodbye, they were shocked to hear a small whimper and see the baby making small movements.

"She was all covered up and full of something that looked like frost," Bouter told the local press at the time.

The parents had planned to name the baby Lucia Abigail, but changed it to Luz Milagros after the incident.
(c) 2012 AFP

"Argentine morgue baby leaves hospital." September 6th, 2012. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-09-a ... pital.html
 
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#93
Shock as Brazilian turns up at own wake
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-20052240

A Brazilian man shocked his family when he appeared at his own wake, police in north-eastern Brazil say.

The family was gathered around the body of what they believed to be 41-year-old car washer Gilberto Araujo when the man himself showed up, causing some relatives to faint.

The body in the coffin is believed to be that of another car washer, who relatives say looked like Gilberto.

Gilberto's brother said he had misidentified him in the morgue.

'Overjoyed'

Jose Marcos Araujo said he had not seen his brother in four months.

He had heard news of the killing of a car washer, and when confronted with a body in the morgue, which he said looked very much like his brother, he assumed it was Gilberto.

The family took the body to his mother's home in the town of Alagoinhas where they mourned the death.

Gilberto Araujo said he was told about his own death by an acquaintance in the street.

"A friend told me there was a coffin and that I was inside it," he said.

"So I said: 'But I'm alive, pinch me!'"

His mother told reporters she was overjoyed when her son showed up alive. "What mother wouldn't be after being told that her son is dead and then sees him alive?" she told reporters.

Police inspector Roberto Lima said the confusion surrounding Mr Araujo's presumed death was "understandable".

"The two men closely resembled each other and both worked as car washers," he said.
 

escargot

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#94
How easy is it to diagnose death?

In April it was reported that a Chinese woman climbed out of her own coffin six days after she was declared dead following a fall.

In 1996, Daphne Banks, a farmer's wife from Cambridgeshire, was pronounced dead at her home by a doctor after an attempted suicide overdose on New Year's Eve - only to be found alive in a hospital mortuary when undertakers spotted that she was still breathing.
etc

Meant to put this up last week when someone started a thread about spurious diagnoses of death but I can't find it now so I've tagged it onto here.
 

rynner2

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#95
Fabrice Muamba recalls the day he 'died' and tells how grateful he is to the people who brought him back
The last thing Fabrice Muamba recalls hearing on March 17, as Bolton played Tottenham in an FA Cup quarter final, was his colleague Zat Knight screaming at him to “come back”.
By Jim White
6:00AM GMT 09 Nov 2012

He tried to do as Knight had suggested, to back-pedal and fulfil his defensive duties. But, gripped by an inexplicably severe headache, he found he couldn’t run. He felt horribly confused; his head spinning, his vision scrambled, he saw two Scott Parkers ahead of him.

And then he just went down. He doesn’t recall collapsing. But one thing is certain: by the time his head hit the White Hart Lane turf, technically he was dead.
It was one of the most shocking things seen at a football ground: a young player dying in plain sight.
In front of 35,000 spectators and millions watching on television, Muamba, a player renowned throughout the game for his fitness, had suffered a massive cardiac arrest.

As the Bolton and Tottenham medical teams, augmented by a leading heart specialist leaping from the crowd to help, attempted to resuscitate him, for over an hour his heart did not function. He was gone.
Nothing sparked it back into action: adrenalin injections, massage, the vigorous application of a defibrillator, he was not responding to anything.

But then, in the hospital operating theatre to where he had been rapidly dispatched, the doctors tried one last thing. Under an electrical stimulus, fully 76 minutes after it stopped, his heart burst back into a beat. As inexplicably as it had stopped, it started again.
Those words of Knight’s were prophetic: Fabrice Muamba did come back.

And here he is, eight months later, in the players’ lounge at Bolton’s Reebok Stadium, tall, slim, healthy and definitively returned.
“I feel great,” he says. “I have good body shape, I’m not getting fat, which is good.”

Not many of us are granted a reprieve from death, let alone one played out on national television.
“I’ve watched it once,” he says of the footage of his collapse. “It was tough to watch.” You would imagine, after watching it, he must feel the luckiest man alive.
Except Muamba is quick to dismiss any idea that his survival was down to good fortune.
“For me there is no such word as luck in the dictionary,” he says. “When it happened, the right people were there for me. They did an unbelievable miracle on me. If this could have happened in any place for me, it was a football pitch because I had the right people there to help. The ambulance, the doctors and the machine. If it happened to me in my house I don’t think we would be having this conversation.”

Muamba does not remember a single second of the 76 minutes his heart had stopped.
But he recalls his remarkably rapid recovery, the excellence of the medical care, the astonishing support he received from those within the game (he cherishes a picture of Lionel Messi wearing a T-shirt before a Barcelona game bearing the legend “Fabrice!!!! We are behind you”).

All of it is detailed in a book he has written about the experience – and the life he led before it as a young refugee from Congo – called appropriately I’m Still Standing.
“I wanted to put a good closure to the situation I had over the last year,” he says of the book. “To be able to stand here just shows the amount of effort people put in to my health and I thank God that I am able to be here.”
Unlike watching the tape of his collapse, Muamba says compiling the book was not difficult. “It was not really an emotional strain,” he says, “because I have already changed my life.”

The book suggests that Muamba’s recovery has been something of a medical marvel. Despite being deprived of oxygen for so long, his brain is not damaged.

At first difficult, his physical movement is now once again that of the athlete. Yet the condition which caused his attack has not gone away. His heart is still prone to an irregular beat. To counter it, he was fitted with a pacemaker which has already kicked in a couple of times.
“Wow, it hits you,” he says of the device he calls his physical seat belt. “You start to feel a bit low then bang it’s like being kicked in the chest and you’re OK again.”

But it has meant that he has been advised a comeback is impossible. While that has its compensations – “I don’t have that worry of not knowing if I’m going to start, or being on the bench, I don’t have to get up early for extra training” – he admits that has been the most difficult part of his recovery: he has yet to find a purpose. Some have suggested that a man as academically sharp as him might be drawn to coaching.

“Nah,” he smiles. “My heart is very small, I don’t need another heart attack. Coaching can wait. For me it is best I take care of my heart first before I go on to something else.”

Not that his heart was the reason he refused an offer to go on ITV’s I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out of Here. He said he baulked at the idea that dying on a football pitch somehow made him a celebrity.
“I’d have been on the plane there right now,” he says. “But I told them I’m not into that sort of thing. You have to parachute in. Nah. I can’t swim. What would I do? You have to know yourself. No thank you.

"People may have seen what happened to me, but I’m the same old Fabrice, buying my orange juice at the supermarket, looking forward to the new ‘Call of Duty’ coming out. I’m not a celebrity.”

He certainly does not exhibit any of the desperate need for attention of the has-beens, never-will-bes and Tory MPs heading to the jungle. He seems centred, happy, philosophical.
As he says, there is nothing like a close brush with death to make you appreciate life. But when he is asked about his future and if there was one thing he would like to do, for a moment his smile disappears.
“One thing?” he says. “Put my boots on and go out training. If I knew that the doctors gave me the all-clear to go out training tomorrow that would be great.” Then he pauses.
“But hey,” he says, grinning widely once more, “there’s more to life than football, right?”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/footba ... -back.html
 

Spudrick68

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#98
He has unwittingly stepped into the spotlight. But its a type of phenomenon that brings out the good in people. Hence Liobel Messi wearing a t shirt saying "Muamba we're with you".
 

rynner2

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#99
Sam Ledward turns 106 after being declared dead in 1936

Sam Ledward is more grateful than most to celebrate his 106th birthday given that he was declared dead 76 years ago.
The former joiner crashed his motorbike in 1936 and says he was in a coma so deep that doctors ordered his body to be taken away.
He was being taken to the mortuary when a hospital porter noticed his "corpse" move and returned him to the ward.

Mr Ledward, of Flintshire, puts his long life down to "sheer luck" - as his fortune all those years ago suggests.
As he celebrated turning 106, he said: "I'll be all right for a while yet. You don't get rid of me like that." 8)

He said: "I was riding on 500cc Triumph. I hadn't had it more than two months. I bought it off a farmer. One of his sons had come to grief on it.
"I just tuned it up and put a new rear tyre on it. I thought the front tyre would be okay but it wasn't. It bust."

He was thrown into the road and his coma was such that doctors concluded that he had died. So they gave the order for the body to be taken away.
Mr Ledward said: "They put me on a trolley and this chap saw something move and took me back. I came to five days later.

"My first recollection of anything was seeing someone stood round the bed and me knocking something out of someone's hand.
"I had knocked a feeding cup out of a nurse's hand."

He was carried back to the ward where he stayed unconscious for another five days. His head and face injuries took six months to heal.

"I've had a good life since," he added.
Most days he catches a bus into town with his companion Millie Minshall, 90, the cousin of his late wife, from the house they share in Gwernaffield, near Mold.

Born and brought up in Cheshire, Mr Ledward and his late wife, Edith, lived in Blackpool. Mrs Ledward died in 1993 but not before telling her husband that her cousin would look after him.
He said: "She said 'go to our Millie,' I'm well treated every day.
"We're doing very well. We knock about together. We used to go abroad a lot but I think I'm too ancient for that now.
"But I'm not too bad for an old codger."

Mr Ledward celebrated his 106th birthday last Friday with Mrs Minshall and her daughter's family.
Mrs Minshall said: "He's not bad, not bad at all."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-20295971
 

rynner2

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Grandmother 'comes back from the dead just minutes before post-mortem' after spending THREE DAYS in the morgue
By Anna Edwards
PUBLISHED: 16:19, 29 December 2012 | UPDATED: 16:45, 29 December 2012
A grandmother has been brought back from the dead twice - and has even survived spending three days in a morgue.
The 61-year-old Russian woman has been declared dead twice by doctors, but each time has come back to life - and once was minutes away from being cut open for her autopsy. :shock:

Hardy Lyudmila Steblitskaya spent 3 days laying in a freezing cold morgue, while her family mourned the retired cook.
The mother's eery habit of returning to life has not only left her family torn between grief and hope that she may come back to life, but perplexed doctors too, The Siberian Times reported.

She has scared both doctors, friends and family once in November last year and in October this year.
The initial confusion began last year, when Lyudmila was taken to Tomsk Regional Clinical Hospital and spent days in hospital because she felt unwell.
When her 29-year-old daughter Anastasia, who has a daughter Nelli, nine, called on a Friday evening to ask about her mother's condition, she was informed by doctors that her mother had died.

The devastated woman began planning her mother's funeral and breaking the bad news to friends and family.
She spent 60,000 roubles (£1,223) buying flowers, a casket, arranging for a grave to be dug, and buying food for the mourners who planned to attend the funeral on the Monday morning, according to the newspaper.
On the Monday, she went to the hospital to collect her mother's body - only to be told to wait as doctors had not performed an autopsy.

She told the newspaper that a startled doctor then approached her and said that her mother was not dead, but was in her bed breathing and alive.
A disbelieving Anastasia went in to the room to find her mother calling her name, and screamed and dropped her bag.
She told The Siberian Times: 'My head was so fuzzy that I didn't even think about getting back into the room, and hugging mum. Or asking her about what happened.
'Instead I started calling everyone, saying things like "Er, sorry. Can you please stop digging the grave. Ah, is it done? OK... well, there won't be a funeral, my mother is alive".' 8)

Her mother cannot remember what happened, only that she was in hospital on the Friday and then woke up in a morgue on Monday to discover that her skin was peeling off from the cold.
Mostly, she is just grateful to be alive and be able to see her friends and family.
In October 2012, Lyudmila - who has a history of heart problems - had another 'apparent death' during a hospital stay but this time doctors brought her back to life after several hours.

On the morgue incident, chief doctor of Tomsk Regional Clinical Hospital Maksim Zayukov, said: 'As of now I cannot explain why this mistake happened,' The Siberian Times reported.
'This sad procedure has always worked in our hospital like clockwork: the moment of death is always registered by the intensive care doctor.
'Proper checks are always conducted. This all happens before the family are informed about the death'.
A hospital spokeswoman said: 'The checks were carried out and she was dead - or so it seemed.
'The papers could not have been signed unless this is what the doctors establish. We are still trying to understand what went wrong in Lyudmila's case'.
Ms Steblitskaya is not the only person to be given a second chance at life.

Earlier this year, mourners in Egypt cheered when the ‘dead’ body they were burying woke up. Hamdi Hafez al-Nubi, a 28-year-old waiter, had been declared dead after suffering a heart attack at work.
His body was being prepared for burial when another doctor, sent to sign his death certificate, discovered he was still warm and managed to revive him.

And in April a 95-year-old Chinese woman climbed out of her own coffin six days after she was declared dead following a fall.
Under Chinese tradition, Li Xiufeng was placed in a coffin kept in her house so friends and relatives could pay their respects. But the day before the funeral, neighbours found an empty coffin and later discovered her in the kitchen cooking.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z2GX9FO33A
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

The story about the Chinese woman is also on this thread:
http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/viewt ... 52#1193152
 

rynner2

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Sam Parnia – the man who could bring you back from the dead
This British doctor specialises in resurrection and insists outdated resuscitation techniques are squandering lives that could be saved
Tim Adams
The Observer, Saturday 6 April 2013 22.00 BST

Sam Parnia MD has a highly sought after medical speciality: resurrection. His patients can be dead for several hours before they are restored to their former selves, with decades of life ahead of them.

Parnia is head of intensive care at the Stony Brook University Hospital in New York. If you'd had a cardiac arrest at Parnia's hospital last year and undergone resuscitation, you would have had a 33% chance of being brought back from death. In an average American hospital, that figure would have fallen to 16% and (though the data is patchy) roughly the same, or less, if your heart were to have stopped beating in a British hospital.

By a conservative extrapolation, Parnia believes the relatively cheap and straightforward methods he uses to restore vital processes could save up to 40,000 American lives a year and maybe 10,000 British ones. Not surprisingly Parnia, who was trained in the UK and moved to the US in 2005, is frustrated that the medical establishment seems slow and reluctant to listen to these figures. He has written a book in the hope of spreading the word.

The Lazarus Effect is nothing short of an attempt to recast our understanding of death, based on Parnia's intimate knowledge of the newly porous nature of the previously "undiscovered country from which no traveller returns". His work in resuscitation has led him logically to wider questions of what constitutes being and not being. In particular, he asks what exactly happens, if you are lying dead before resuscitation, to your individual self and all its attendant character and memories – your "soul", as he is not shy to call it – before it is eventually restored to you a few hours later?

When I meet Parnia, he is not long off the plane from New York after a night flight with his wife and baby daughter, and the particular revival he is craving is the miracle of strong coffee. He is both forthright and softly spoken, full of careful zeal for his findings. As I sit across the table from him, he can make even the most extraordinary claim seem calmly rational. "It is my belief," he says, "that anyone who dies of a cause that is reversible should not really die any more. That is: every heart attack victim should no longer die. I have to be careful when I state that because people will say, 'My husband has died recently and you are saying that need not have happened'. But the fact is heart attacks themselves are quite easily managed. If you can manage the process of death properly then you go in, take out the clot, put a stent in, the heart will function in most cases. And the same with infections, pneumonia or whatever. People who don't respond to antibiotics in time, we could keep them there for a while longer [after they had died] until they did respond."

Parnia's belief is backed up by his experience at the margin of life and death in intensive care units for the past two decades – he did his training at Guy's and St Thomas' in London – and particularly in the past five years or so when most of the advances in resuscitation have occurred. Those advances – most notably the drastic cooling of the corpse to slow neuronal deterioration and the monitoring and maintenance of oxygen levels to the brain – have not yet become accepted possibilities in the medical profession. Parnia is on a mission to change that.

The one thing that is certain about all of our lives, he says, is that we will all eventually experience a cardiac arrest. All our hearts will stop beating. What happens in the minutes and hours after that will potentially be the most significant moments of our biography. At present, the likelihood is, however, that in those crucial moments we will find ourselves in the medical environment of the 1960s or 1970s.

The kind of CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) that we are familiar with from medical dramas – the frenzied pumping of the chest – remains rooted, Parnia claims, in its serendipitous discovery in 1960. It remains a haphazard kind of procedure, often performed more in hope than anticipation. Partly, this is a question of personnel. Parnia is quietly maddened by the worldwide hospital habit, in the event of death, to send the most junior of doctors along "to have a go at CPR". It is as if hospital staff have given up before they have started.

"Most doctors will do CPR for 20 minutes and then stop," he says. "The decision to stop is completely arbitrary but it is based on an instinct that after that time brain damage is very likely and you don't want to bring people back into a persistent vegetative state. But if you understand all the things that are going on in the brain in those minutes – as we now can – then you can minimise that possibility. There are numerous studies that show that if you implement all the various resuscitation steps together you not only get a doubling of your survival rates but the people who come back are not brain damaged."

In Parnia's ideal world, the way that people are resuscitated would first take in the knowledge that machines are much better at CPR than doctors. After that, he suggests, the next step is "to understand that you need to elevate the level of care". The first thing is to cool down the body to best preserve the brain cells, which are by then in the process of apoptosis, or suicide.

At the same time, it is necessary to keep up the level of oxygen in the blood. In Japan, this is already standard practice in emergency rooms. Using a technique called an ECMO, the blood of the deceased is siphoned out of the body, put through a membrane oxygenator and pumped round again. This buys the time needed to fix the underlying problem that caused the person to die in the first place. If the level of oxygen to the brain falls below 45% of normal the heart will not restart, Parnia's research shows. Anything above that and there is a good chance.

Potentially, by this means, dead time can be extended to hours and there are still positive outcomes. "The longest I know of is a Japanese girl I mention in the book," Parnia says. "She had been dead for more than three hours. And she was resuscitated for six hours. Afterwards, she returned to life perfectly fine and has, I have been told, recently had a baby."

etc...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/ ... rus-effect
 

rynner2

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Kondoru said:
But all of this is just common sense, isn't it?
It's not 'common' if most people don't practice it - which is what Parnia alleges:
"Not surprisingly Parnia, who was trained in the UK and moved to the US in 2005, is frustrated that the medical establishment seems slow and reluctant to listen to these figures."
 

EnolaGaia

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'Dead' man comes back to life at his funeral

Mourners attending a funeral in central Zimbabwe were shocked when the man they had come to bury "returned from the dead."

Mr Zanthe told The Chronicle newspaper, that he has no recollection of how he 'died' nor how he was 'resurrected'

By Peta Thornycroft, Johannesburg4:54PM BST 14 May 2013

Family and friends were filing past a coffin with the remains of Brighton Dama Zanthe, 34, when one of them noticed the dead man's legs twitching.

One of the mourners, Lot Gaka, who employs Mr Zanthe at his transport company, said: "I was the first to notice Zanthe's moving legs as I was in the queue to view his body. This shocked me. We called an ambulance immediately. It's a miracle and people are still in disbelief."

Mr Zanthe had been unwell for some time and was laid to rest inside a coffin last Monday after "dying" at home the day before.

Mr Zanthe told The Chronicle newspaper, that he has no recollection of how he "died" nor how he was "resurrected," as his memory only returned when he woke up in a hospital in Gweru 140 miles southwest of Zimbabwe's capital Harare.

"Everything is history to me. What I can only confirm is that people gathered at my house to mourn but I was given another chance and I am alive. I feel OK now."

SOURCE: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... neral.html
 

rynner2

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Excerpt from an obituary:

In August 1943, at a high level conference, Major General Orde Wingate won support for his plans to drop long-range penetration groups into Burma behind the Japanese lines. The objective of Special Force, better known as Wingate’s Chindits, was to cut the lines of communication serving the Japanese Army operating against the American-led Chinese forces advancing from the north.

....

It was in the nature of the Chindits’ operations that they had to strike and move on through the jungle and when they moved it was not possible to carry sick or wounded men. Lucas went down with sand fly fever, a very serious illness, and had to be left in a foxhole with just a gun and a couple of bullets and some water.

He was in a coma but when he regained consciousness a day or two later, he decided to set out alone and try to rejoin his company. After walking for several days, he eventually managed to catch up with the main body of troops. He had been given up for dead and when he suddenly appeared out of the jungle, looking like death, several of his comrades fainted. A few days later, he was back in action at Natyigon.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituar ... ement=mid2
 

rynner2

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'Dead body' in River Trent is actually alive

An apparently-dead woman floating in the River Trent was actually still alive, despite having been in the water for an hour.
The woman, in her 70s, opened her eyes when a police officer who waded into the river reached her lifeless form.
PC Mat Mitchell said the woman had looked dead and called it "one of the most bizarre experiences of my career".

He pulled her to the bank at Colwick Marina and she was taken to hospital where she was said to be doing well.
Pc Mitchell, of Nottinghamshire Police, had thrown a life ring to the woman on Tuesday but feared the worst when she did not respond and waded into the water.

The crew of a passing pleasure boat pulled him onboard so he could get nearer before he called out to the woman, who was floating on her back and looked "very peaceful".
"Her head was slightly submerged and she really did look dead. Then, in one of the most bizarre experiences of my career, she opened her eyes," he said. :shock:
"She had the most piercing blue eyes - it was so bizarre. I stripped off and jumped in the water, she was about 20 metres away, and swam her back to the bank.
"We were more than surprised, I don't think I can repeat what we said." ;)

PC Mitchell, who was helped by PC Katie Eustace, added: "It's certainly not every day you go wading into the water.
"I'd like to say it was like a scene from Baywatch but it was actually very cold and I'm not quite as chiselled as David Hasselhoff.
"We were preparing for the worst so it was so nice that this had a happy ending."

The woman is expected to be discharged from hospital soon.
"I have spoken to her husband since the incident and she's doing well," PC Mitchell said.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-no ... e-23189453
 

Recycled1

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I went in the sea at Bournemouth this afternoon -my first time this year.
As is often the case, I was the only OAP in the water.
What a load of wimps! :)
 

rynner2

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Gillian Tuckman's pension stopped after death 'error'

A woman's pension was stopped when her "death" was mistakenly registered by the Department for Work and Pensions.
Gillian Tuckman, 66, from St Austell, in Cornwall, was unaware of the mistake until Cornwall Council sent a letter to her "executors" offering its condolences.
She said what has distressed her most was her "death" was registered as the date her son died in March. :(

The DWP said "human error" was responsible for the mix up.
"We apologise to Miss Tuckman for the mistakes made at this very distressing time. I can confirm that all benefit payments have now been paid," a DWP statement said.

Cornwall Council said it also offered its "unreserved apologies" to Miss Tuckman.
It said it had received two electronic notifications from the DWP advising of a death on 19 March 2013 and quoting Miss Tuckman's National Insurance Number.
"On 2 July an assessor acted on these notifications and wrote a letter addressed to Miss Tuckman's executors as is usual in such circumstances," the council said.

It said when Miss Tuckman contacted the council, it reinstated her council benefit "immediately".
"Once again, the council apologies for the distress caused to Miss Tuckman at what is already such a difficult time."

But Miss Tuckman said while both the DWP and council have apologised "to the media" they have not said sorry to her.
"But more than an apology, what I really want is an explanation as to why it happened and some reassurances it won't happen again," she told BBC News.
"I'm very much alive and kicking and I've been able to deal with it, but to find out I "died" on the same day as my son was really distressing."

Miss Tuckman said when her son, Michael Halton, died in March, she contacted the DWP to see if, as a pensioner, any funeral assistance was available.
"He's got a different surname because I reverted to my maiden name, but that's the only possible thing I can think of.
"Mistakes happen, but I've had no explanation or apology - just a rather blase 'It's just a glitch in the system'."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-23353307
 
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Ohio man remains legally dead despite his recent court plea
http://rt.com/usa/ohio-man-legally-dead-916/
Published time: October 09, 2013 02:36
Edited time: October 09, 2013 04:48 Get short URL
Reuters / Jason Reed JIR / CNReuters

Consider northwest Ohio man Donald Eugene Miller Jr. the walking dead - as he has been since 1994.

Miller was ruled legally dead by a court in 1994, eight years after he disappeared from his home in Arcadia. His appeal Monday in Hancock County Probate Court to rescind his “death” didn’t earn a change of status in the view of the law.

Judge Allan Davis, the same judge who ruled him dead nearly 20 years ago, said Monday nothing will change for Miller, who was informed of his status by his parents upon his return in 2005.

Miller’s request for a reversal did not fall within the three-year legal limit for challenging a death ruling, Davis said, according to The Courier.

"We've got the obvious here. A man sitting in the courtroom, he appears to be in good health," Davis said.

Miller fled the state to avoid paying child support, the judge said in court.

"I don't know where that leaves you, but you're still deceased as far as the law is concerned," Davis said.

One can be legally declared dead in absentia despite the absence of solid proof of one’s death - for instance, the existence of remains that can be attributed to the person - often after a certain period of time determined by jurisdictional law.

Miller withheld most details of his past in court Monday, saying he was an alcoholic and unsure of what to do once he lost his job.

"My paycheck was being taken away from me and I had nothing left," he said.

He worked in various places in Atlanta and Florida after leaving Hancock County in late 1989.

"It kind of went further than I ever expected it to," Miller, 61, said. "I just kind of took off, ended up in different places," he said.

He asked the court to reverse the death ruling so he can begin to receive Social Security benefits and apply for a driver’s license again. Both were canceled upon the 1994 ruling.

Miller, now of Fostoria, may have more luck with the Social Security Administration in federal court, though his lawyer said Miller does not have the resources to pursue such a challenge.

"My client's here on a wing and a prayer today," attorney Francis Marley said.

Miller never contacted his two children upon leaving Ohio, he told the court.

His ex-wife, Robin Miller, said she asked for the death ruling to get his Social Security benefits for the sake of his children. She refused to testify in the case.

He owed around $26,000 in overdue child support once the death ruling was made, she said.

Though she sympathized with him, she said she opposed his request for reversal given she does not have the money to pay his benefits back.
 

OneWingedBird

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That really is preposterous on so many levels.

Including the fact that she'd be required to pay back $26k even if she had originally acted in good faith and so had the court that originally made the decision.

:?
 
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'Dead' China baby is found alive
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A baby pronounced dead has been found alive in a funeral home in China.
21 NOVEMBER 2013
http://www.independent.ie/world-news/de ... 73366.html

A funeral home discovered a baby was alive two days after he was pronounced dead at a hospital in eastern China.

Authorities revoked the licence of the doctor who mistakenly declared the newborn boy dead, the health department in Anhui province said.

It said funeral home workers found the boy to be alive on Wednesday, two days after he was pronounced dead at a provincial Children's Hospital.

The department said the boy has severe deformities and the hospital treated him until Monday, when his condition deteriorated.

Authorities have ruled that the doctor - identified only by the surname Cha - was negligent and that hospital's newborn unit was chaotic.

The boy remains in critical condition.

AP
 

sherbetbizarre

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Man returns home to find parents laying flowers at his grave

A son returned to his home town and greeted his parents… as they laid flowers on his grave.

Jaroslaw Carolinski, from Siedliska, Poland, had been declared dead after his mother and father mistook a body found by police in a forest near the Ukranian border for his.

The 38-year-old left without warning in October 2011 to ‘find himself’ and his parents were certain their missing son was gone forever.

But he finally returned home last week and on seeing his upset parents standing over his grave, declared: ‘Hello mum and dad. I’m back.’

His mother reportedly fainted when she saw him, with Mr Carolinski saying the whole incident had been surreal.

‘Of course they [his parents] were both shocked and delighted to see me,’ he added.

The prosecutor’s office is now working to determine who is actually buried in the grave.
http://metro.co.uk/2013/11/26/man-retur ... e-4202069/
 
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Kenyan 'corpse' wakes up in Naivasha morgue
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-25681048

The patient in Naivasha District Hospital who spent time in morgue after being declared dead although still alive - Thursday 9 January 2014

Paul Mutora was visited by relatives after being rescued from the morgue

Kenyan authorities have launched an investigation into how a man declared dead in a hospital woke up alive in its morgue the next day.

Shocked mortuary workers at Naivasha hospital ran away when the body stirred and was seen to be breathing.

Paul Mutora, who had tried to kill himself by swallowing insecticide, was pronounced dead on Wednesday night.

The chief medic said the drug used to treat him slowed the heart beat, which may have led to the mistake.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

The mortuary attendant and a worker took to their heels screaming”

Witness
"This might have confused medical personnel, but the victim was saved before he could be embalmed," Dr Joseph Mburu, the superintendent in charge of Naivasha District Hospital, was quoted by Kenya's Standard newspaper as saying.

According to the paper, Mr Mutora's father and other relatives visited the morgue on Thursday morning to view the body and then returned home to start funeral arrangements.

"But in the afternoon we were informed, he was alive and were left in shock," the father said.

A witness told the Star newspaper that when noises were heard inside the cold room: "The mortuary attendant and a worker took to their heels screaming."

Journalists photographed Mr Mutora later recovering on a male ward in the hospital in the lakeside town, 90km (55 miles) north-west of the capital, Nairobi,

"This was a mistake from the start and I apologise to my father," the patient said.
 

rynner2

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Death rumour 'cost vintage car specialist thousands'

A vintage car specialist who returned from holiday to find people thought he was dead has said the rumour has cost him thousands in lost business.
Well-wishers paid moving tributes to Lloyd Bryan on an online forum after reading that he had supposedly died of a heart attack.

Mr Bryan, from Tunbridge Wells, Kent, said he had no idea who started the hoax.
The 74-year-old said the falsehood was costing him about £2,000 a week.
Neither Mr Bryan or his wife Julie, who returned from holiday in the Caribbean in December, use the internet.
"A lot of the traders saw me and said 'oh, he's alive' and kept coming up and pinching me," he said.
"Quite a few of my customers rang up to find out if it was true.
"It's costing me about £2,000 a week."

He said if he could speak to his customers, his message would be: "Come back, I'm alive."
Mrs Bryan said: "It was a shock at first.
"I was just glad that when we heard about it, I knew that we were on holiday together."

Social media author David Taylor said: "Unfortunately it's all to[o] common these days, with the likes of Facebook, Twitter online forums and all the social networks.
"That means that people can put a lot of information online.
"A lot of it can be completely made up - lies or malicious falsehoods or whatever.
"Unfortunately, if people see it online, they believe it."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-26249001
 

Pietro_Mercurios

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A close one.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...ter-man-wakes-up-in-funeral-home-9161070.html

Alive and kicking: Body bag starts moving after man wakes up in funeral home

Workers were about to embalm 78-year-old former farmer

Independent. Rose Troup Buchanan. 28 February 2014


Workers at a US funeral home were treated to a shock after a body they were preparing to embalm suddenly woke up kicking.

Despite being examined by Mississippi county coroner Dexter Howard, 78-year-old Walter Williams came back to life hours after he had been officially pronounced dead.

Staff at the Porter and Sons Funeral Home rushed Mr Williams, a former farmer and school worker, to hospital after they realised the mistake.

The manager of Porter and Sons Byron Porter said: “I’ve never seen anything like it.”

Speaking to TV channel WAPTV coroner Howard confirmed he had checked Mr Williams pulse and found no heartbeat, declaring him dead at 10.30pm on Wednesday.

He said the experience was a miracle, although he did suggest Mr William’s pacemaker may have turned off causing it to appear as if he no longer had a pulse.

Mr William’s nephew Eddie Hester watched his uncle get put into the body bag, zipped up and taken away.

He said the entire family were happy to have Mr Williams back.

“I don’t know how long he’s going to be here, but I know he’s back right now. That’s all that counts,” Mr Hester added.
 
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Is he really dead this time?

'Long dead' Mexico drug lord Nazario Moreno killed
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-26510643

Police guard the morgue where Nazario Moreno's body is held, Apatzingan, Michoacan state, Mexico (10 March 2014)

Security is high around the morgue where the body is being held

Officials in Mexico say that they have killed a drug lord who was reported to have been shot dead three years ago.

Nazario Moreno, known as El Mas Loco - The Craziest One - was the founder of the La Familia cartel and regarded as the spiritual leader of its offshoot, the brutal Knights Templar.

His death was first announced after a 2010 shootout, but no body was found and he was reportedly seen alive since.

Police said he was finally tracked down and shot dead in Michoacan state.

"From a fingerprint analysis we have confirmed 100% that this was Nazario Moreno Gonzalez," said Tomas Zeron, the head of investigations at the federal prosecutor's office.

'Dangerous person'
Government security spokesman Alejandro Rubido said security officials had been tracking Moreno for some time.


Mexican authorities, speaking in 2010, said Nazario Moreno died in clashes
"Anonymous tips indicated that Nazario Moreno was not only living, but continued operating at the head of a criminal group conducting extortion, kidnapping and other crimes," he said at a news briefing in Mexico City.

"This person was known as dangerous," he said, with police believing he had committed multiple murders since his reported death.

Police image of fingerprints of Nazario Moreno
Police used fingerprints to confirm the identity of the dead body

Mr Rubido said Moreno was stopped by police on Sunday morning in the village of Tumbiscatio in Michoacan state.

"When he was asked to turn himself in, he opened fire and was killed," he said.

Moreno, 43, was the founder of the La Familia cartel, which dominated the drugs trade in Michoacan but was believed to have been severely weakened by his reported death.

Its breakaway group, the Knights Templar - know for its brutality and its use of religious imagery - subsequently took over many of the cartel's operations and runs much of the methamphetamine production and trafficking in the west of Mexico.

The BBC's Mexico correspondent Will Grant says Moreno's killing is a second major success for the government's campaign against the drugs trade within a month.

In late February, Joaquin Guzman, known as El Chapo or "Shorty" was arrested in Sinaloa state.

His Sinaloa cartel is believed to be one of the biggest criminal organisations in the world, trafficking drugs into more than 50 countries worldwide.

He was one of Mexico's most-wanted men and had been on the run since escaping a high-security prison in a laundry basket in 2001.

Some 60,000 people have died across Mexico since 2006 when the previous government under Felipe Calderon deployed the military against the drugs gangs.

Knights Templar drug cartel

First emerged in 2011 as an offshoot of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel
Takes its name from a Christian military order from the Middle Ages
Claims to protect Michoacan residents from kidnappings, extortion and robberies committed by rival gangs
Controls much of the methamphetamine and marijuana trade in western Mexico

Q&A: Mexico's drug-related violence
 

rynner2

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I present this for information only. Personally, I'm suspicious of the Christian background, and a book written by the (in debt) father that got made into a film, etc...

An interesting tale, but it probably says more about American fundamentalists than life after death.


The little boy who says he went to Heaven - then came back! How four-year-old's startlingly vivid account of meeting God has gripped America and become a Hollywood film
By Tom Leonard
Published: 01:41, 8 May 2014 | Updated: 08:14, 8 May 2014

Four months after Colton Burpo miraculously survived a life-threatening burst appendix, his parents began to suspect that something rather extraordinary had happened to him.
There were signs of change in their son not long after the operation, but it took a while for them to understand the ‘truth’.

The first unusual occurrence was when Todd and Sonja returned from the hospital to their home in Nebraska in March 2003 to find a pile of bills
They baulked at the £14,000 bill from the hospital that had saved the life of their then four-year-old son. But Colton told them they had to pay the surgeon — as Jesus had, ‘used him to help fix me’.

When they later told him off for not sharing his toys with other children, he apologised immediately.
Not because of their intervention, but because, ‘Jesus told me I had to be nice,’ he explained.

Weeks later, when Todd — a Methodist minister — was about to officiate at a funeral, Colton pointed at the coffin and shouted: ‘He can’t get into Heaven if he didn’t have Jesus in his heart!’
His parents were both committed Christians and wanted their children to believe, too. But how, they wondered, did Colton know so much about God and what He wanted?

Then their son told them what he experienced on the operating table.
While the surgeons had battled to save him and his parents prayed fervently, Colton had gone to Heaven and met Jesus.
Colton’s extraordinary claims — and the response of his family and those in their local town — have been made into a blockbuster Hollywood film which is now to be shown in British cinemas.
Starring Greg Kinnear and British actress Kelly Reilly as Mr and Mrs Burpo, Heaven Is For Real has already stormed the U.S. box office, taking £31 million in two weeks.

The film and the best-selling book it’s based on have captivated the U.S., inspiring churchgoers and non-believers alike with a simple but comforting tale of a little boy who discovers there is an afterlife and that Heaven really is the eternal paradise of Christian belief.

The book — written by Todd Burpo — has been phenomenally successful since it was published in 2010. It has sold ten million copies and been translated into 39 languages. It spent more than 60 weeks as the No. 1 non-fiction paperback on the New York Times bestseller list.

The success of the book and the film are in large part due to Colton’s claims that he didn’t just snatch a glimpse of Heaven through the clouds, but experienced paradise in glorious detail.

etc...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... pital.html

(Burpo is an interesting name, but it's never appeared on FTMB until now!)
 

krakenten

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We'll never know.

My understanding of religion is that God wants our faith(and for us to be kind to one another), so proof positive of Heaven would be against the plan.

The afterlife may be a load of dung....or maybe not. I know that I'm comforted by the thought that I'll see my lost ones again, in a better place.

If I'm wrong, I've lost nothing. If I'm right, I'll find Paradise.

Omar councilled us to take the cash and let the credit go. But that's not wise business.

(one man returned from clinical death reported he had gone to Hell-he was a really bad egg-after which he chose a better life. He reports being happier.)
 
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