Bigfoot / Sasquatch In North America

Endlessly Amazed

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Bear sighting: it was crossing the old highway 37 (now I-69) between Bloomington and Martinsville. This was in the 1970s, and this was farmland, not forest. It has been frustrating to me to tell of my sighting, only to be told I am wrong because there are no bears in Indiana. :)

I had known weird people in Southern Indiana who had personal zoos, with wild animals, all completely illegal and poorly maintained. I think the bear escaped from one of these.

The manipulation of flora: I think it is sasquatch, not people, not weird wind, not racoons, etc. To claim otherwise, it seems to me, is to explain it away, and not explain it. If documented evidence, and not just conjecture, exists of a conventional explanation, I am unaware of it.
 

dr wu

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Bear sighting: it was crossing the old highway 37 (now I-69) between Bloomington and Martinsville. This was in the 1970s, and this was farmland, not forest. It has been frustrating to me to tell of my sighting, only to be told I am wrong because there are no bears in Indiana. :)

I had known weird people in Southern Indiana who had personal zoos, with wild animals, all completely illegal and poorly maintained. I think the bear escaped from one of these.

The manipulation of flora: I think it is sasquatch, not people, not weird wind, not racoons, etc. To claim otherwise, it seems to me, is to explain it away, and not explain it. If documented evidence, and not just conjecture, exists of a conventional explanation, I am unaware of it.
Thanks.....
I spent 6 years at IU Bloomington....1969-1975. Used to travel that highway all the time. Back in the day near Bloomington and Monroe Forest there were some wild areas...they certainly could have had bears. I too knew a few 'strange ' folk back in the day....none had zoo animals though.
Most of the small lean-to's or branch constructions always looked too small for a Sasquatch but 'anything is possible'.
Side note: In 1974 I spent that summer at home before returning to school, but my roomate and close friend spent some time in Martinsville ,IN with mutual friends ; one week that summer they had a ufo outbreak there and they all saw large orangeish globes of light flying around for several nights.
 
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Endlessly Amazed

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Thanks.....
I spent 6 years at IU Bloomington....1969-1975. Used to travel that highway all the time. Back in the day near Bloomington and Monroe Forest there were some wild areas...they certainly could have had bears. I too knew a few 'strange ' folk back in the day....none had zoo animals though.
Most of the small lean-to's or branch constructions always looked too small for a Sasquatch but 'anything is possible'.
Side note: In 1974 I spent that summer at home before returning to school, but my roomate and close friend spent some time in Martinsville ,IN with mutual friends ; one week that summer they had a ufo outbreak there and they all saw large orangeish globes of light flying around for several nights.
@dr wu – Our time at IUB overlapped. The weird manipulation to tops of small trees: I saw this east of Lake Griffy north of Griffy creek, heading to Bethel Lane; also in Deam Wilderness. BTW, Deam had the biggest timber rattlesnakes I have ever seen. Also the healthiest poison ivy.

I vaguely remember the Martinsville UFO outbreak. I never saw a thing!
 

CALGACUS03

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There's an article on The Guardian website today about a three part mini-series regarding Sasquatch/Bigfoot that's coming to Hulu on 20th April (UK date to be announced).

It turns out though that it's more about the backwoods cannabis growing industry. I'm not sure that this is the best thread to post this in (if not then I'd be grateful if the mods could move it), but it is geographically relevant and apparently the film-maker did start by listening to the Sasquatch Chronicles podcast and became intrigued by the killings that had been ascribed to the hominid.

‘I am now truly afraid of the woods’: behind the hunt for Sasquatch

Audiences who hit play on Joshua Rofé’s new documentary miniseries Sasquatch in the expectation that someone’s finally gotten some straight answers about that elusive hirsute bastard will be sorely disappointed. “I wasn’t hung up on whether I believe in Bigfoot or whether I buy the details of this story. All of that became secondary and fell by the wayside,” Rofé tells the Guardian via Zoom. “I was struck by the visceral fear present in all these encounter stories. I was taken by how afraid these people were, which was totally authentic.”
The rest of the article can be found here.
 

stu neville

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Growers have been using Bigfoot as a deterrent for years in the same way moonshiners have done in the Appalachians. There was a suggestion that the Fred Beck / Ape Canyon story was a ruse to keep people away from a gold seam, but that's since been discredited seeing as the prospectors never returned to the mountain, and the family surrendered all rights to the area some years later.

It all sounds a bit Scooby Doo but don't underestimate the fear factor.
 

Kondoru

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That idea could backfire so badly.

Instead of having locals who know when to turn a blind eye, you would get in city weirdos who peep and pry.
 

stu neville

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The point is, though, that many of these places are unimaginably remote: there are very few locals, let alone passing city dwellers. Example - the location in which Ron Morehead & co recorded the Sierra vocalisations is accessible only after travelling 20 plus miles on a logging road, then two days on horseback (or three to four on foot.) It's sixty or so miles from anywhere.
 
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