Body Modification

ArthurASCII

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hallybods said:
(Being Devils Advocate) As for you not caring less - well if you don't really care then why are you posting on the subject? ;)

Ah.

Although I am ambivalent to the tattood body per se, I am intrigued by the historical and fashionable aspects.

It's good to know that your "body art" means something special to you. Most people who've told me that turned out to have merely picked a "tailor-made" design from a book in the tattoo shop or have a set of a la mode chinese characters that spell the word or phrase that they chose (at least, that's what the tattooist told them) - that's when the need to justify clicks in.

Good luck to you. Next time I am seized by the overwhelming impulse to advertise my innermost feelings in a symbolic shape by having a quantity of ink introduced into my body subdermally, I'll donate the money to charity instead - that'll be a more than symbolic gesture.
 

escargot

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I've read, and believe, that in the 'West' tattoos are traditionally sought at a time of change in a person's life. That's why young servicemen (my son among them) come home on leave, especially from foreign climes, with fresh tattoos.

The actual design isn't the point. It's the ritual that matters, even if it only consists of a crowd of drunken sailors dragging their wet-behind-the-ears colleague into the shop and holding him up/down while the tattooist does their worst.;)

Tattoos are asociated with working and especially criminal classes in Britain. The only respectable tattoos which an upper or middle class man (never woman) could have at one time were military ones.

It's just fashion now, and why not? It's peeps' own bodies. Three of my 4 offspring have them. I don't object (which I feel makes them think me somewhat unsporting- I'm supposed to be outraged!) as they are the ones who will have to live with them when they become old hat.

My brother and his girlfriend had matching Disney tattoos a couple of years ago, completely in keeping with the 'life change' theory. Why the hell would a grown man of 40-odd want a childish cartoon Tigger drawn permanently on his arm? Answer- the design didn't matter: he needed the 'blood ritual' to mark his commitment to this woman in his life, having divorced the mother of his children. :D

My son returned from his first Army posting with a gorilla tattooed on his shoulder. No idea why he chose the gorilla, he says- just wanted a tattoo and randomly pointed to that one.

I had a tattoo done many years ago and looking back I can see that it marked a definite stage in my life. At the time I just 'wanted' one. There you go.
 

ArthurASCII

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A very eurdite and interesting post Escargot. The ritual "thing" is no doubt the most common reason why most people have themselves tattood (you seldom see people queuing at the Tattooist on their own).
 

escargot

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Thank you, Arthur!
I really must get out more. ;)
 

punychicken

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escargot said:
I've read, and believe, that in the 'West' tattoos are traditionally sought at a time of change in a person's life.

i couldnt agree with you more! but i would like to add that it marks a transition in many many cultures beyond the scope of an east/west division. but im sure that goes without saying! ;)

as for stages in life, i think im approaching another one at the moment! what to have and where though...
 

escargot

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Lots of women dye their hair blonde after divorce too. If that isn't a life-change-occasioned-body-modification then I don't know what is. ;)

I too am feeling faint urges for another tattoo.

There's an African tattoo god who sometimes calls out to his followers. They respond by having a tattoo. The pain is their sacrifice and the decorative mark serves as a permanent reminder of their devotions.

Is the tattoo god calling to me?
Or am I in the middle of another life change?

Well, I've just been finally divorced, and the BF is now officially living with me. ;)
 

OneWingedBird

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to those who couldn't care less aout their "soon-to-be-ugly mauve smudges" body art.

My step dad had lots of tatoos that he picked up in his teens while he was in the Royal Navy. Having seen what they looked like at 40, I wouldn't even think of getting one. It doesn't matter how super they look now, give it 20 years and they will look a mess.

I really don't get the whole tribal/cultural aspect of tatooing. Staking a claim on someone elses cultural heritage is something that I've become incredibly sceptical of in recent years. Tatooing is cultural if you're a Dayak/Mouri/Inuit, but for the bog standard romano-british/anglo saxon, there isn't really any cultural context besides what we've invented in recent times.

Btw I've heard that some of the serious tatoo nuts quite like the pain aspet of it too...
 

punychicken

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if you look at the top 6 photos on this page you will see something that I am finding to be quite an inspiration!

The red dragon on the left side of this guys back is 'kinda' what I am after stylistically. As for the size of it....

I already have a dragon head and koi carp on my upper arm, which is quite nice as its signifying a change over period in my life (more on koi and dragons here ) but Im after Japanese this time. A quick note on Japanese Koi here
 

hallybods

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BlackRiver Falls - tattooing started about the same time in just about all cultures and ancient celts were extensively tattooed.

As for those 'mauve smudges' inks have been developed in the last x-amount of years and tattoos last for much longer.
 

punychicken

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Herodian 3rd C. AD III, 14, 68 :

Most of northern Britain is marshy since it is constantly washed by the ocean tides. The barbarians are accustomed to swim in these marshes or to run through them with the water up to their waists. For the most part they are naked and think nothing of getting mud on themselves. Also, being unfamiliar with the use of clothing, they adorn their waists and necks with iron, considering this sun ornament and a sign of wealth, just as other barbarians do gold. They tattoo their bodies with various designs and pictures of all kinds of animals. This is the reason they do not wear clothes: so as not to cover up the designs on their bodies.
 

escargot

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Sounds like the chavs in the park in the summer.
 

intaglio

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The royal navy and the army have used tattoos since the 18th century. We have little record of mediaeval tattos in northern europe
 

Mighty_Emperor

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hallybods said:
In my experience Arthur I find that of all the tattooed people I have met only a handful have had them done because it is in fashion.

This has been largely my experience too - I know a lot of people into tattoing and body modification (online and offline. However, I don't know anyone into amputation or castration), including a number of piercers and tattoo artists (I'm unsure how I have managed to dodge the needle for so long - more accident than design as I've known what I'd have done for a long time), and people rarely have it done because its trendy. I might be spoiled as people are some heavily modfied in my local that if you went for a trendy tattoo or piercing you'd look pretty silly so people either have none or a lot -the only exception I can think of was one of my friends who had a Native American done on his arm and he now lives in Belgium ;)

I do thnk that some things are very badly judged though - I saw a young girl the other day with a small stud in the middle of her top lip right under one nostril and just looked like a bogey which just isn't cool.

My feeling about Orlan is that while I am impressed by the fully body tattooists and body modifiers mentioned earlier she has run into problems because when your face is your canvas, and if you don't stick to a theme like the others have, then your face starts to become a palimpsest of all the various ideas you have had over the years and, as I said above, she is realy starting to look a mess but possibly that is her plan - to challenge our ideas of beauty but I'm not concvinced - she did that a while ago.

Emps
 

rynner2

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Branding! (Tats are for wimps!)

It’s the brand new body craze - and it hurts
Brendan Montague

FORGET tattoos or piercings. The latest trend for body decoration enthusiasts is to have their skin branded in the style of a Texan prize steer.

Red-hot metal brands or cauterising pens, which burn at more than 1,000C, are used to sear a design permanently into the flesh.

Historically, slaves and dangerous criminals were branded and it is still used as a form of torture in Iraq.

In Britain, the hot branding of livestock is outlawed by animal welfare legislation - but there are no rules to stop humans voluntarily having their skin burnt as a fashion statement.

The procedure, which costs about £70, is painful and can be dangerous because of the risk of nerve damage and infection.

Graham Martin, president of the Tattoo and Piercing Industry association, who offers branding at his Holier Than Thou studio in Manchester, said it was becoming popular with professionals and that he had branded teachers, nurses and a policeman. He claimed that the number of people asking him for the procedure has risen from just one a year in 2002 to more than one a week.

“We have had people as young as 16 ask for a branding. We have turned them away because we would not tattoo anyone under the age of 18. But there is no legislation banning this,” he added.

Dave Wiper of the Modern Savage tattoo studio in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, branded himself 10 years ago and has seen a steep increase in the number of people with the scar patterns in the past three years. He has branded a Muslim man who wanted a tattoo but cannot introduce ink to the body because of his religion.

Many of those who have their skin branded choose to film the experience and post it on YouTube, the video website.

Paul Doling, a 29-year-old insurance clerk from Eastbourne, East Sussex, had eight circles in two lines burnt onto his forearm, which took an hour to complete. “The adrenaline rush masks the pain,” he said.

A Health and Safety Executive spokesman said the practice of branding had not been made illegal and compared it with contact sports such as boxing, where deliberate injury was allowed by the courts.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/u ... 753986.ece
 

OneWingedBird

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some of the s&m heads have been upto this sort of thing for quite a while... i'm surprised it's made it this far mainstream though... :?
 

rynner2

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Girl has 56 stars tattooed on face after 'falling asleep'
A furious Belgian father has gone to the police after his teenage daughter ended up with 56 stars tattooed on her face after allegedly asking the tattooist for "some points of colour".
By Bruno Waterfield in Brussels
Published: 5:33PM BST 16 Jun 2009

Kimberley Vlaminck, 18, claimed that she asked for only three stars to be tattooed near her left eye as a present from her father, Diego, who was upholding a family tradition of tattoos.

"My father wanted to pay because in our family everyone has a tattoo," she said.

As her father ate an ice cream outside, Miss Vlaeminck claims she fell asleep before waking up to find her face covered in the "nightmare" tattoos.

"When he started to tattoo me, I did not feel pain and I fell asleep. I awoke as he tattooed me on the nose and I saw what he had done. I counted 56 stars," she said.

"I cannot go out on to the street, I am so embarrassed. I just look ugly, a freak, mutilated."

Miss Vlaeminck and her family are seeking damages worth £9,000 to pay for laser surgery to remove the tattoos.

But Rouslan Toumaniantz, who runs the Courtrai tattoo parlour called The Tattoo Box, has denied the allegations and demanded payment of 50 euros for the stars.

"She was awake all the time. I did not hypnotise or dope her, as they say, it was with agreement. No way could I have tattooed so many stars on her face against her will," he said.

Mr Toumaniantz has counterclaimed that the problems only began when the father saw his teenage daughter's tattoos.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... sleep.html
 

mugwump2

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My step dad had lots of tatoos that he picked up in his teens while he was in the Royal Navy. Having seen what they looked like at 40, I wouldn't even think of getting one. It doesn't matter how super they look now, give it 20 years and they will look a mess.

I have to disagree with you here. My Grandad is 93, he had his tattoos done in the 1950's and they still look good.
Most people who've told me that turned out to have merely picked a "tailor-made" design from a book in the tattoo shop or have a set of a la mode chinese characters that spell the word or phrase that they chose (at least, that's what the tattooist told them) - that's when the need to justify clicks in..

I must be unusual as all three of my tattoos were designed by myself in collaboration with the tattoo artist and were very carefully thought about. My husband also designs his own tattoos.

I've read, and believe, that in the 'West' tattoos are traditionally sought at a time of change in a person's life.

I agree with this. I got my first one coming out of a 10 year relationship. I had wanted a tattoo for most of this time and as my partner didn't want me to get one it i had held off. I got mine to remind me to not let other people control me. I still love the tattoo i got done and it does still remind me to be true to myself.
 

Eponastill

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Girl has 56 stars tattooed on face after 'falling asleep'

Yeah right. Like you could fall asleep having a tattoo. On your face.

It's very obvious isn't it - the girl went home, her parents freaked out, she pretended 'it wasn't what she'd asked for'. I fear this is not going to stand up in court.
 

mugwump2

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No way she fell asleep more likely had to pretend she did after her dad freaked.
A small point but reputable tattoists in the UK follow a code of practice which discourages tattoing above the neck (the back of the hands etc) especially if the person is not heavily tattooed on other parts of their body.
 

escargot

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Yup, I agree that the silly girl probably asked for the tatts and then bottled it when the Da went mad. She can't possibly have slept through all that pain. Unless the tattooist did drug her, which is extremely unlikely.

However, Mugwump's point is a good one - a reputable tattooist would not be happy with marking a young woman's face, so this one doesn't exactly look blameless.

Nice to 'see' you by the way, Mugwump! :D
 

mugwump2

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Hiya Escargot, I've been lurking for a while due to login problems:x .
It's nice to be back on board! :D
 

OneWingedBird

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I have to disagree with you here. My Grandad is 93, he had his tattoos done in the 1950's and they still look good.

Maybe some were better done than others. No idea where precisely my stepfather got his, but judging by his stories, prob. some back street in singapore round the corner from the whorehouse where he lost his virginity then had a nosebleed all over the sheets.
 

uair01

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This tattoo story reminded me of this - disquieting but rather clever - conceptual artwork:

For 80064 (2004), Z?mijewski persuaded a concentration camp survivor to have the fading tattoo of his prisoner number refreshed on his arm. Apparently unconcerned about the pain, the man seems more troubled by the thought that the fresh colour might efface the original tattoo, but finally agrees to have it done.

Picture here:
http://www.artnet.com/artwork/424916112 ... 80064.html

Also this proves that tattoos do fade and get fuzzy with time.
 

rynner2

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rynner2 said:
Girl has 56 stars tattooed on face after 'falling asleep'
A furious Belgian father has gone to the police after his teenage daughter ended up with 56 stars tattooed on her face after allegedly asking the tattooist for "some points of colour".
Girl with 56 stars tattooed on face admits she asked for them
A teenage girl who claimed 56 stars were tattooed on her on her face as she slept when she asked for three has admitted she was awake the whole time – and lied because her father was "furious".
By Our Foreign Staff
Published: 5:00PM BST 22 Jun 2009

Kimberley Vlaminck had insisted she dozed off after asking the tattooist for just three small stars – then woke in horror to find her face was covered.

The Belgian blamed the Flemish-speaking tattooist for not being able to understand her French and English instructions.

Amid a frenzy of media attention, she then pledged to sue the tattoo artist, Rouslan Toumaniantz, for the £9,000 she needed for laser surgery to have them removed.

She said after the tattooing last week: "It is terrible for me. I cannot go out on to the street. I look like a freak."

But the 18-year-old has finally confessed she did not fall asleep, that she wanted all the stars and was "fully aware" of what Mr Toumaniantz was doing.

Ms Vlaminck told a Dutch TV crew: "I asked for 56 stars and initially adored them. But when my father saw them, he was furious. So I said I fell asleep and the that the tattooist mad made a mistake."

Mr Toumaniantz – himself covered from head to foot in tattoos and piercings – had consistently denied he had made a mistake and always insisted Vlaminck wanted all 56 stars.

He said at the time: "I maintain that she absolutely agreed that I tattoo those 56 stars on the left side of her face."

But despite insisting she had asked for 56 stars, he still initially agreed to pay for half of the treatment to remove the tattoos.

He said: "Kimberley is unhappy and it is not my wish to have an unsatisfied client."

"I don't regret it. To tell you the truth, this has given me some publicity." Mr Toumanaintz is now said to have withdrawn his cash offer and said from now on he will get written consent from clients before he begins tattooing.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... -them.html
 

whiner

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I'm in my early forties female, and have a few tattoos. the first one one done 25 years ago, the last one, 6 weeks ago.
When i had my first tattoo done, hardly anybody had them, and it just makes me laugh now, it's who hasn't got one.
It must be so hard for teenagers to shock their parents now.
Most of us have been there, done that. :)
 

stu neville

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mugwump2 said:
My step dad had lots of tatoos that he picked up in his teens while he was in the Royal Navy. Having seen what they looked like at 40, I wouldn't even think of getting one. It doesn't matter how super they look now, give it 20 years and they will look a mess.

I have to disagree with you here. My Grandad is 93, he had his tattoos done in the 1950's and they still look good.
My father had one done on his upper arm in the late 40s when he was in the RAF (a simple blue heart/banner with the name of his then paramour), and even when I was a small child in the late 60s it was already very blurry - now it just looks like a very faint bruise. Indeed, when he was recently hospitalised (he's nearly 80) it took them a long while to realise it was actually a tattoo.
 

escargot

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My brother has the tackiest, crassest tattoo I've ever seen, of a bikini'd woman trussed up with string. Absolutely horrendous. I'm hoping for his sake that it fades sometime soon. :lol:
 

whiner

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One tattoo that i saw on a woman really made me have a double take, the woman must have been 65-70 years old. It was summer and she was wearing a vest type top. She had an american eagle tattoed right across her chest. I remember at the time thinking, i'd love to know what the story to that tattoo was. It had been there for quite a long time by the look and colour of it. I must admit it really made me smile.
Thats how to grow old. :D
 

Stormkhan

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From personal experience, tattoo's do fade - black tends to remain very longer but turns blue but the actual "pattern" changing depends on the quality of the skin or the health of the wearer, since skin relies on muscle tone. So a simple, abstract pattern - like the "tribal / spike" style in current vogue - shouldn't change very much.

My first was done when I was 20 (after a harrowing separation) - the black has faded and the red has too, but the pattern is still clear; it's a phoenix. My second is a Sun/Moon roundel with a hare - tribal style - leaping over it. All in black, I had this done for my 40th birthday. Both designs are my own.

My elder brother was a tattoist and, in his sixties, has many cliche images over his arms, back and chest but a crying baby's face with my name under it is still sharp and clear ... just like he first did it himself when I was born! :D
 
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