Boko Haram Islamist Cult

ramonmercado

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New book, based on the secret diary of one of the abducted girls, reveals how they risked beatings and death to defy their captors.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...s-how-abducted-women-survived-boko-haram-camp

Had the Nigerian government not refused the offer of a British special forces mission to rescue the girls, this dreadful story would probably have ended sooner. Instead, Nigeria initially sent their own forces in a bodged attempt to rescue the girls, killing 10 of them, and then struck a deal with Boko Haram to free some of the girls, in exchange for releasing a number of convicted terrorists from jail.

Normally I'd agree with you on this but here we are talking about a large number of hostages being held at quite a distance into rough country. Not a job for the SAS on their own, them plus maybe 2 companies of Paratroopers or Royal Marines or Nigerian units. Even if the hostages could be freed and the BH forces neutralised you would then have to get the girls out. Maybe a forced march to a helicopter landing site. Quite a lot of logistics involved in putting such a mission together. and then carrying it out.

The Special Boat Squadron was involved in an attempt to rescue two hostages (British & Italian) in 2012 but BH murdered both while the attack was taking place. This may have influenced the Nigerian government's attitude.
 

ramonmercado

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Some good news.

The Nigerian military says nearly 6,000 Boko Haram members including commanders, fighters and their families have surrendered to the authorities in the last couple of weeks.

Cameroon had also announced the surrender of hundreds of Boko Haram militants in the country recently.

In Nigeria, the mass surrender of the members of the militant group is a result of the intense military offensive in the north-east of the country, the army says.

The death of Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau in May could be another reason.

Many of his followers have either surrendered to the authorities or switched their loyalty to rival group Islamic State West Africa Province (Iswap).

The Nigerian authorities say they’re now profiling those who have surrendered for possible de-radicalisation and rehabilitation.

But some Nigerians are sceptical about reintegrating the former fighters back into the society - citing possible risks.

https://www.bbc.com/news/live/world-africa-47639452
 

ramonmercado

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Interesting short article on Islamist terror in Nigeria.

From the “Sokoto Jihad” to the “Boko Jihad”: Interrogating the Motivations for Recruiting of Terrorist.
Bernard B. Fyanka, Redeemer’s University Ede.

Background and the Problem


The state of Nigeria has been engaged in the war on terror since 2009 and the group BokoHaram has remained the primary belligerent. By May 2014 over 12,000 Nigerians had beenkilled in the insurgency,[1] while one in ve persons from Borno, Yobe and Adamawa stateshad been internally displaced.[2] The growth, development and metamorphosis of groups likeBoko Haram retain historical antecedents in a 2-century old process of Islamic radicalizationstarting from the Jihad of Uthman Dan Fodio in 1804. Each outburst of radical religiousbviolence over the centuries has an identifiable gestation period that could have been terminated at some point.

https://www.academia.edu/50858627/F...Recruiting_of_Terrorist?email_work_card=title
 
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