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Mighty_Emperor

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One would have been an accident but two is asking for trouble.

Another American arrested in Brazil after making obscene gesture

Saturday, February 7, 2004 Posted: 0115 GMT ( 9:15 AM HKT)



SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP) -- In the second incident of its kind in three weeks, an American was arrested Friday after making an obscene gesture while being fingerprinted and photographed at a Brazilian airport as part of the entry requirements for U.S. citizens.

Douglas A. Skolnick, a retired bank worker from New Jersey, raised his middle finger while going through the new entry requirement at the international airport in Foz de Iguacu, a southeastern resort town famous for its massive waterfalls, said Marcos Koren, a federal police spokesman.

Police accused Skolnick of showing contempt to authorities, the same crime in Brazil that netted American Airlines pilot Dale Robin Hersh a 36,000 reals (,750) fine on January 14 after he lifted his middle finger while entering Brazil. The airline paid the fine, and Hersh was sent back to the United States.

Skolnick, 55, "did it the same way as the American pilot," Koren said.

He was scheduled to appear before a judge Friday night who will decide how much to fine him and whether to deport him or let him rejoin his tour group of about 80 mostly retired Americans, Koren said. Foz de Iguacu sits at the border with Argentina and Paraguay, about 500 miles (800 kilometers) southeast of Sao Paulo.

Members of Skolnick's tour group, which arrived from Santiago, Chile, on a chartered flight knew that they would be fingerprinted and photographed and were surprised and dismayed with Skolnick's conduct, Koren said.

They were allowed into Brazil, and Skolnick's wife accompanied them to their hotel. The group is expected to depart Brazil on Sunday.

"They'll go and see the falls and the beauties of this region, but he won't know any of the beauty, just the inside of a cell," Koren said.

Brazil imposed the new rules that Americans be fingerprinted and photographed at entry points in response the similar rules in the United States for citizens of Brazil and other countries whose citizens need visas to enter.

http://edition.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/americas/02/06/brazil.fingerprinting.ap/index.html

The again if any country is looking to imprison more Yanks then this could be an easy route ;)

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Mighty_Emperor

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Uncle Sam's genitals go on display

09 February 2004


RIO DE JANEIRO: Uncle Sam, that symbol of US patriotism, has a front seat on an extravagantly decorated float in the parade of samba schools in Rio de Janeiro's upcoming Carnival.


It won't be a pretty sight though. His pants are down around his ankles, his genitals exposed for all to see, and his outstretched fingers smeared with ink.

And somewhere out in the crowd will be hundreds of Saddam Hussein look-a-likes.

The five-day Carnival in this seaside Brazilian city – one of the world's wildest annual celebrations – is less than two weeks away.

Participants are putting the finishing touches to gaudy costumes and elaborate floats, and honing their dance routines and the custom-written samba songs known as enredos.

As always, there's a good dose of political satire.

The 4-metre, styrofoam Uncle Sam is at present in a guarded warehouse of the Sao Clemente samba school, one of 14 groups who will parade over the nights of February 22 and February 23 in the Sambodromo hoping to win the champion's crown.

Each school has a theme based on an aspect of Brazilian history or life, expounded in fantastic allegorical displays of singing and dancing. Sao Clemente will have 3800 members taking part, including a drums corps of 260.

The school's theme this year is Cordel – traditional booklets about news events or legends written for humble folk.

"It is critical and satirical," Sao Clemente vice president Roberto Gomez told a visitor to the warehouse. "Uncle Sam will reflect the frictions between the United States and Brazil."

The two countries have been embroiled in a dispute this past year over international trade accords. When the float was first designed, Uncle Sam was to be squatting toilet-fashion over a model of the Brazilian Congress, Gomez said.

COMPULSORY FINGERPRINTING

Then Washington offended Brazilians by imposing compulsory fingerprinting when they entered the United States. Brazil retaliated with a similar measure.

"With the fingerprinting, we decided to move him to the front of the float," Gomez said.

Uncle Sam is also be gagged, symbolising a perceived US clamp-down on freedoms.

Brazil itself will not escape criticism. Another of the seven floats will decry political corruption. One more will depict the idyllic Copacabana beach when Europeans and natives first met five centuries ago compared to the modern-day strip, a haunt of prostitutes, drug dealers and hustlers.

If that sounds a tad serious, the Sao Clemente enredo reassures that carnival is about fun at its rawest. The chorus of the throbbing samba urges: "Everybody naked, pure beauty, everybody naked, more than crazy."

Another school, the Academicos do Grande Rio, is taking that to heart. Its theme is "Let's Put on a Condom."

In a display that should put into perspective the furore in the United States over the glimpse of Janet Jackson's breast at the Super Bowl, a Grande Rio float will feature statues and dancers locked in embraces from the Karma Sutra sex guide.

The Roman Catholic church in Rio has complained but, said Grande Rio artistic director Joaosinho Trinta: "The church's attitude is very hypocritical, medieval and very wrong. The theme boosts the campaign for safe sex that prevents that terrible epidemic Aids."

Meanwhile masks of Saddam Hussein are this year's biggest sellers, said Arnaldo Valles, king of Rio's carnival mask-makers.

The most popular depicts the haggard, bearded Saddam as he was found hiding in a hole by US troops in December.

"As soon as saw that picture in the newspaper, I knew that was the mask. It's a huge success," said Valles, 79.

http://stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,2809321a4560,00.html

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punychicken

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Story

One vagrant died and three were badly beaten in overnight attacks in Brazil's biggest city of Sao Paulo, raising the number of victims of a suspected death squad to 14 in four days.

Security officials said on Sunday the attacks again happened in Sao Paulo's city centre. It is busy during work hours but gets desolate at night and over the weekends.

On Thursday night, four tramps were killed and five battered unconscious. The murders happened against a background of rising kidnappings and muggings in this already violent city -- South America's largest.

"We are intensifying patrols in the streets. This appears to be an organised operation," said urban security secretary Benedito Domingos Mariano. State prosecutor Carlos Cardoso said earlier that investigators were working with the theory that an extermination squad was behind the murders and beatings.

Mariano spoke during a religious service for the victims, attended by Justice Minister Marcio Thomaz Bastos, who promised to "bring these bandits to justice." Several hundred people gathered in the centre to protest against the killings.

Religious groups working with the homeless estimate there are about 10,000 street people in Sao Paulo -- a city of 10 million. As in many big Brazilian cities, hundreds of thousands also live in deplorable conditions in teeming slums.

This time, a 40-year-old woman without documents was found dead and three vagrants, including another woman, injured. All victims were beaten on the head, probably with a mallet. "The wounds are very serious," Mariano said.

Police say the killings might have been ordered by businessmen irritated by the presence of tramps or be the work of a group with a grievance against homeless people.

About 45,000 Brazilians are murdered each year, or one person every 12 minutes, the highest number of any country, according to the World Health Organisation.

Police are badly paid and overworked, and disgruntled citizens have been known to turn to vigilantes to take care of problems. An Amnesty International report in May said death squads operated in many Brazilian states, targeting criminals and also carrying out "social cleansing."
 
A

Anonymous

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they've moved on from the street children then? :hmph:

Death squads are an old problem and it looks like they're still with us.

How I love progress.
 

sunsplash1

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Death squaddies...
Trained by CIA, supported by right wings everywhere
No minority group too large for targeting...
:(
 
A

Anonymous

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The problem is that noone in Brazil realy gives a toss.

This is, afterall, the country where they discused walling in the ghettos!
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Well Brazilia in this report:

October 5, 2004


Brasilia Awaits Its Next Life

* The South American capital is a vortex of cults, where believers are preparing for a new civilization. 'It's sort of the Sedona of Brazil.'


By Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer

VALE DO AMANHECER, Brazil — In her diaphanous, lavender gown, spangled with sequined Stars of David and a crescent moon, Andrea Brandao reminisces about the pretty girl she once was — 500 years ago.

"I lived in France, in 1500, and I was the daughter of a woman named Mary of Socorro," Brandao said. "She was a nanny for a rich family."

But the daughter of the house was consumed with envy and had Brandao killed "because I was beautiful," she lamented, shaking a head at her own untimely end half a millennium ago.

It was an eyebrow-raising tale of Renaissance household intrigue — and just one of countless stories of restless souls and discontented spirits told by fantastically costumed adherents of a mystical cult based here just outside Brasilia, the futuristic-looking capital that has been likened to another planet.

As Brandao, a 29-year-old hairdresser in her present incarnation, spoke, hundreds of Brazilians decked out as Mayan princes, spear-toting Roman centurions and wandering Gypsies milled about, gathered for a feast day. Faces rapt, they soaked up the dazzling sunshine and the supernatural energy they believe is harnessed here.

Since its establishment as Brazil's capital nearly 50 years ago, after a colossal public works project that created a city virtually out of nothing, Brasilia has been a magnet for seers and sages, cultists and kooks. They consider the place a source of inspiration and even, some say, the cradle of a new race of spiritually superior beings — politicians notwithstanding.

"The spot is very powerful," said U.S. writer Alex Shoumatoff, author of a book on the history of Brasilia. "It's sort of the Sedona of Brazil," a reference to the Arizona town known for its "power vortexes."

Many have come here in anticipation of the dawn of a new age — sects that embrace reincarnation and universal oneness, academics and sci-fi enthusiasts who associate Brasilia with ancient Egypt or the lost city of Atlantis.

Their dreams are fed by an alien-looking cityscape, a showcase for Modernist architect Oscar Niemeyer. Among his creations are the twin towers of the Brazilian National Congress, between which the sun rises, Stonehenge-like, on April 21, the date the capital was officially moved from Rio de Janeiro.

The city's natural setting adds to the sense of being in an extraordinary place. Almost any spot in Brasilia affords a dramatic vista extending in every direction, red earth and green trees spread out beneath a seemingly limitless blue sky.

Then there is the prophecy.

In 1883, an Italian priest named Dom Bosco had a strange and wondrous dream of a land abundant in precious metals and oil that would be discovered between the 15th and 20th parallels. "There a grand civilization will appear, a Promised Land flowing with milk and honey," the priest recorded in his journal. "These things will happen in the third generation."

Many believe that Brasilia, situated between the 15th and 16th parallels, is that place. The man who made the city a reality, former Brazilian President Juscelino Kubitschek, thought so.

Construction of Brasilia began under Kubitschek in 1956, which, by the president's reckoning, was about the third generation after Bosco's death in 1888. "The mysterious forces that rule the world have acted in such a way as to … create the opportunity to convert the old dream into reality," he wrote in his memoirs.

The idea of moving Brazil's capital inland, from the coastal city of Salvador and, later, overcrowded Rio, had been bandied about for more than a century, partly as a way to develop the country's mammoth interior. Brazil's constitution of 1891 enshrined the idea of setting aside 5,500 square miles somewhere for a new federal capital.

Kubitschek had made building Brasilia a centerpiece of his presidential campaign, promising to pick a site, hire architects and planners, finance construction and unveil the shiny, new city within four years, by the end of his first term. Some thought him mad, given that the patch of terrain eventually selected, in the landlocked state of Goias, was 75 miles from the nearest road and even farther from an airport. Equipment, workers and materials initially had to be dropped in by helicopter.

"The government gave the workers financial incentives, because nobody wanted to leave Rio," said Aldo Paviani, an urban studies professor at the University of Brasilia. "It established the 'double salary' to recruit workers. Life was very expensive in Brasilia. Everything was imported."

Besides Bosco's prophecy, Brasilia was built to fulfill a secular dream of functional egalitarianism, which Niemeyer, urban planner Lucio Costa and landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx tried to express in the city's geometric design. From the air, it resembles a bird in flight, with residential areas in the wings and government ministries, the presidential palace and the Supreme Court clumped along the line of the bird's body, a broad, grassy mall known as the Monumental Axis.

Mystics immediately converged on the area, among them Tia Neiva, a purportedly clairvoyant truck driver who founded the Vale do Amanhecer, or Valley of the Dawn, in 1959. Preaching a blend of Christian beliefs, Afro-Brazilian rituals and pagan elements, the sect operates out of a funky temple complex that boasts a red pyramid, painted wooden cutouts of Tia Neiva and Jesus, and the words "God Saves" in large, white letters on the hillside.

Adherents swear by the group's ability to improve their present lives and to rescue and comfort the unhappy souls of past ones, all in preparation for the advent of a new civilization in the third millennium.

"We have more love for our neighbor, we tolerate better the consequences and causes of things that happen to us and we help other people. But mainly we help the disincarnated," said Gilda Celeste Oliveira, a 35-year-old typist. Pinned to her chest was a badge identifying a spirit named Drogana, the "green slave of the Centurion," as her personal spiritual guide.

"It's a logical religion that works with faith and reason," Oliveira said. "It only looks weird from the outside."

Universal peace, healing and harmony are common themes among the sects in and around Brasilia — the hallmarks, members say, of the enlightened age to come.

At the Cidade Ecletica (Eclectic City), about an hour's drive from the capital, followers of an ex-Brazilian air force pilot known as Master Yokanan strive to unify all religions on Earth. Yokanan founded the group in Rio but, guided by the stars, moved it to the Brasilia area in 1956. Today, about 600 people live in the community, sharing a single telephone and attending services, robed in white tunics.

For the more academically minded, there's the International Holistic University on Brasilia's outskirts, for people seeking higher consciousness.

And believers in the power of crystals, as well as less ethereally minded tourists, flock to the Temple of Goodwill, a seven-sided pyramidal building on the city's west side. Nestled in the pyramid's apex is what the temple describes as the world's largest raw crystal. It weighs 46 pounds and is "capable of purifying the atmosphere and condensing energy," minister Enaildo Viana said.

In keeping with the way things seem to happen in these parts, the crystal was donated by a miner in nearby Cristalina who had dreamed of making a major discovery three days before he struck pay dirt, Viana said.

"We found [a crystal] exactly when we needed it," Viana said. "We had been looking all over the world."

The temple welcomes people of any or no faith who are in search of harmony. Visitors can meditate in the Egyptian Room, an underground chamber with painted hieroglyphics and Nile scenes, and a replica of King Tut's throne.

The identification of Brasilia with ancient Egypt is one of the city's most intriguing pieces of lore.

In his history of Brasilia, Ronaldo Costa Couto recounts that a U.S.-trained Egyptologist named Iara Kern concluded, after six years of study, that Kubitschek was the reincarnation of the pharaoh Akhnaton and Brasilia was the modern version of Akhnaton's made-to-order capital along the banks of the Nile.

Kubitschek and Akhnaton dedicated themselves to constructing their new capitals, and both died 16 years after inaugurating the cities, Kern noted. Their capitals boast pyramids or buildings based on pyramidal or triangular forms. The ibis was a bird sacred to the ancient Egyptians, and Brasilia, don't forget, resembles an ibis from the air.

Akhnaton ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago and tried to impose monotheism on his kingdom, then a radical innovation. Brasilia, according to Kern, also embodied forward thinking and was destined to become the capital of the third millennium.

That prediction has yet to come true. Nor, critics say, has the city fulfilled Bosco's prophecy that it would flow with milk and honey or the dream of modern Brazilian leaders that it would exemplify an egalitarian, utilitarian society.

"The city could be fairer when it comes to the distribution of wealth. You have a center where the rich live, and the poor live far away," said Paviani at the University of Brasilia. "Lucio Costa, the urban planner, had the opposite in mind when he planned it."

Visitors complain that the distances and the huge, car-clogged boulevards are hostile to pedestrians, as is the blazing sun.

But the passions Brasilia inspires, religious or otherwise, are what make it special — even awe-inspiring — admirers say.

"Brasilia was born under special circumstances," Viana said. "It carries with it a heavy mystical load."

Source
 

lopaka

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Brazilian killers blame role-playing game for murder of family

Associated Press
May. 31, 2005 07:15 AM

RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil - The crime was shocking by any standard - a family of three bound, drugged and shot in the head at close range in their beds. Then, a twist: The killers said it was all a game, and the penalty for losing was death.

When they were arrested on May 13, Ronald Ribeiro Rodrigues, a 22-year-old glass worker, and Mayderson Vargas Mendes, an unemployed 21-year-old, confessed to the murder of 21-year-old physics student Tiago Guedes and his parents, Douglas and Heloisa, in Guarapari, a seaside city of 230 miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro.

They said the killings were part of a role-playing game whose rules required the loser to let the winners kill him and his family.



"The suspects are very cool about what they did. They know what they did was wrong and that they will have to pay," said Espirito Santo state police inspector Alexandre Lincoln Capela. "But I believe, from what I have seen, even going to prison is part of the game for them."

The case drew national attention and threw a spotlight on the subculture of role-playing games, which often employ occult imagery. Legislators in Espirito Santo state hastily introduced a bill to ban the games, and priests and pastors across Brazil penned sermons denouncing them.

"We must put the brakes on anything that encourages violence in our state," said Espirito Santo state assemblyman Robson Vaillant.

But some experts on the games have cast doubt on the killers' stories, saying their account doesn't fit with the traditions of such games - the best-known of which is Dungeons & Dragons - in which players assume characters and develop stories within the boundaries of elaborately defined fantasy worlds.

Rodrigues' mother told reporters she had never heard of role-playing games and that her son never played them.

And on Web sites and bulletin boards devoted to role-playing games, enthusiasts argue that the crime was a simple robbery and homicide, and the suspects are blaming the game in hopes of escaping punishment.

By claiming the family died as the result of a game, the suspects are entitled to a jury trial in which they are expected to plead temporary insanity. If they had confessed to robbery and homicide, a judge would have sentenced them. Brazil has no death penalty.


The case had parallels to the 2001 slaying of an 18-year-old woman, who was stabbed to death in the colonial city of Ouro Preto. Police claimed she had been playing a game over three days that included a bet that the loser would die. No one has been convicted.

But police said the game that left the Guedes family dead lasted only five hours. Guedes assumed the role of a policeman named Flavio, Mendes played a demon and Rodrigues was the wizard who ran the game.

Police said it wasn't clear how Guedes lost, but when he did, the players went to the bank where Guedes cleaned out his account, withdrawing $1,745.

Guedes then helped the two others to tie up and drug his elderly parents, Douglas and Heloisa, and watched as both were shot in the head. Finally, he was subjected to the same fate.

The suspects stole a computer from his house before leaving, police said.

To enthusiasts of role-playing games, the police version is full of holes. They say games can last for months or years and that there are no winners and losers, and never any betting.


Rodrigues and Mendes were working-class men who had known each other for more than 10 years and met the middle-class Guedes only on the day of the killing. It seemed more than suspicious that Guedes was the loser, and that they were playing at his home with his parents there to watch.

Rodrigues' mother, Lucimara Rodigues Ribeiro, told the local newspaper A Tribuna that she had never heard of role-playing games.

"My son never played them at home," she said. "He's a good boy, and never behaved strangely."

But in an interview with the same newspaper, Rodrigues said he became so caught up in the game that he didn't actually believe the victims would die.

"When you create a character it seems like you're in a real game - like you're in a forest, in the middle of lots of beasts," he said. "The game's not over. We're going to continue playing."


Copyright © 2005, azcentral.com. All rights reserved.

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/ ... 31-ON.html
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Their story stinks to the high heavens!!

I'd like to see what evidence they come up with to support it.
 

ramonmercado

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Brazil city proposes ban on death

Municipal regulations normally ban anything from smoking in public places to parking in certain zones. But officials in the Brazilian town of Biritiba Mirim, 70km (45 miles) east of Sao Paulo, have gone far beyond that.

They plan to prohibit residents from dying because the local cemetery has reached full capacity.

Mayor Roberto Pereira says the bill is meant as a protest against federal regulations that bar new or expanded cemeteries in preservation areas.

"They have not taken local demands into consideration", he claims.

Mr Pereira wants to build a new cemetery, but the project has been stalled because 98% of Biritiba Mirim is considered a preservation area.

A 2003 decree by Brazil's National Environment Council forbids burial grounds in protected areas.

'Ridiculous'

Biritiba Mirim, a town of 28,000 inhabitants, not only wants to prohibit residents from passing away.

The bill also calls on people to take care of their health in order to avoid death.


Of course the bill is laughable, unconstitutional, and will never be approved
Gilson Soares de Campos, aide to the mayor

"I haven't got a job, nor am I healthy. And now they say I can't die. That's ridiculous," Amarildo do Prado, an unemployed resident, told local media.

The city council is expected to vote on the regulation next week.

"Of course the bill is laughable, unconstitutional, and will never be approved," said Gilson Soares de Campos, an aide to the mayor.

"But can you think of a better marketing strategy to persuade the government to modify the environmental legislation that is barring us from building a new cemetery?"

The bill states that "offenders will be held responsible for their acts". However, it does not say what the punishment will be.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/w ... 527868.stm

Published: 2005/12/14 13:40:23 GMT

© BBC MMV
 

pixelprince

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Yeah, but there's always someone willing to break the rules!
 

Philo_T

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Are they going to go the Disney route?
Disney can legitmately claim that no one has ever died at one of their theme parks, because they always ensure that accident victims are removed from park property before being declared dead.
 

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With death penalty?
 

ramonmercado

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Protest against president again features nearly all-white upper-middle class displays of racism, desire to protect status and putting ‘have nots’ back in their place

brazilian-protest-of-the-rich.jpg


Note from BW of Brazil: Once again, another protest and once again Brazil shows how divided it is really is along lines of race and class. Just for the sake of context, if you haven’t already heard from your favorite mainstream news source, millions of Brazilians took to the streets on Sunday in another display of self-serving outrage involving the severe economic crisis that has gripped the country for the past year, corruption charges dealing with the so-called ‘Lava Jato’ scandal and calls for the end of 14 years of the PT (Workers’ Party) rule. But was this all that was at play or were there some other issues that people won’t openly admit?

Sometimes it’s very revealing to just sit back and analyze the photos that come out of such displays even without the captions. Take the photo below for example. It encapsulates perfectly what many people feel about the true meanings of these protests. What makes the photo so intriguing is the fact that the meme on the top of the photo actually circulated around social networks during the protests against Dilma in March of 2015. The point of the meme sums up Brazil almost perfectly in terms of race and class. The upper middle class white woman protesting and calling for “justice for Brazil” as her black nanny pushes her children around in the baby carriage. So many things could be said about the meme. Reminiscent of slavery era, as well as modern Brazil where black women were/are believed to be treated like “one of the family”.White feminists who tell black women that all women are oppressed but absolutely not understanding her own privilege as white.

black-nanny-in-brazil-1.jpg


The meme’s relevance was brought home in yesterday’s protest when a photographer captured a scene that portrayed the meme almost perfectly! White upper-middle class couple, black nanny, twin babies in a baby stroller. Nothing wrong with that, right? I mean, at least she’s got a job! Other photos also hint at the reality of race in Brazil. The overwhelming whiteness of the crowds. The ‘us’ vs. ‘them’ division of the country. Moreblackface and the added ‘bonus’ of making a mockery of lynchings, not funny considering the ongoing Brazilian obsession with both! The calls for the endaffirmative action and social welfare policies such as Bolsa Família that have made a university education attainable for thousands of Afro-Brazilians and helped lift millions out of abject poverty respectively (1). ...

https://youthandeldersja.wordpress....-too-much-to-the-poor-protests-led-by-whites/
 

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Parliament in Brazil has voted to start impeachment proceedings against President Dilma Rousseff over charges of manipulating government accounts.

The "yes" camp comfortably won the required two-thirds majority in the vote in the lower house in Brasilia.

The motion will now go to the upper house, the Senate, which is expected to suspend Ms Rousseff next month while it carries out a formal trial.

She denies tampering with the accounts to help secure her re-election in 2014.

Her supporters describe the vote as a "coup against democracy" and the ruling Workers' Party has promised to continue its fight to defend her "in the streets and in the Senate".

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-36069477
 

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The Approaching Coup
Brazil’s congress votes today on whether to impeach Dilma Rousseff.

Demonstrators calling for the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff on March 15, 2015. Rubens Passaro / Flickr

Our next issue, “Between the Risings,” is out this month. To celebrate its release, international subscriptions are $25 off.

In March 2014, a federal judge in Brazil, Sérgio Moro, opened an investigation into the state-controlled oil company, Petrobras, and its relationship with elected officials and contractors. What began as a money-laundering investigation has turned into a sprawling campaign against huge sections of Brazil’s governing establishment.

Operation Lava Jato (“car wash”), as the investigation is known, is now the driving force behind the potential impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff and the political ruin of the Workers’ Party (PT) she leads. While the PT has not shied away from neoliberal reforms, police terror in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas, and massive extractive projects, its fall would open the door to the Brazilian right.

Today, Brazil’s lower house will vote on whether to begin impeachment proceedings. Here, Camila Moreno, a well-known left intellectual in Brazil, speaks with Ulrich Brand about the stakes of the scandal, the role of oil in the Brazilian economy, and what an impeachment could mean for the Left.

Scandals over government corruption seem to be driving the political situation in Brazil. What is at stake here?
Right now democracy and the rule of law is at stake. Every day the escalating crisis gains clearer contours and it appears that indeed a coup d’etat is on the way. It is not a classic coup, promoted or supported by the military. Instead, it’s disguised under the banner of the impeachment process.

Although the ability to impeach an elected president is constitutionally provided, it needs to be grounded in, and justified by, some crime. It’s an extreme measure — with far-reaching implications for the social and political order and the democratic process — and so should not be misused.

Fiscal responsibility — not corruption — is currently the main legal argument used by the coalition of forces working to force Dilma Rousseff out of the presidency and the Workers’ Party out of government. The request to begin the impeachment process was accepted based on a petition accusing her of fiscal mismanagement.

This concerns a procedure referred to as “pedalas fiscais” — a procedure introduced in 2000 to regulate government expenditures in all levels of government. ...

https://www.jacobinmag.com/2016/04/dilma-rousseff-lula-pt-impeachment-temer-petrobras-moro/
 

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The real reason Dilma Rousseff’s enemies want her impeached

Corruption is just the pretext for a wealthy elite who failed to defeat Brazil’s president at the ballot box

The story of Brazil’s political crisis, and the rapidly changing global perception of it, begins with its national media. The country’s dominant broadcast and print outlets are owned by a tiny handful of Brazil’s richest families, and are steadfastly conservative. For decades, those media outlets have been used to agitate for the Brazilian rich, ensuring that severe wealth inequality (and the political inequality that results) remains firmly in place.

Indeed, most of today’s largest media outlets – that appear respectable to outsiders – supported the 1964 military coup that ushered in two decades of rightwing dictatorship and further enriched the nation’s oligarchs. This key historical event still casts a shadow over the country’s identity and politics. Those corporations – led by the multiple media arms of the Globo organisation –heralded that coup as a noble blow against a corrupt, democratically elected liberal government. Sound familiar?
For more than a year, those same media outlets have peddled a self-serving narrative: an angry citizenry, driven by fury over government corruption, rising against and demanding the overthrow of Brazil’s first female president, Dilma Rousseff, and her Workers’ party (PT). The world saw endless images of huge crowds of protesters in the streets, always an inspiring sight.

But what most outside Brazil did not see was that the country’s plutocratic media had spent months inciting those protests (while pretending merely to “cover” them). The protesters were not remotely representative of Brazil’s population. They were, instead, disproportionately white and wealthy: the very same people who have opposed the PT and its anti-poverty programmes for two decades.

Slowly, the outside world has begun to see past the pleasing, two-dimensional caricature manufactured by its domestic press, and to recognise who will be empowered once Rousseff is removed. It has now become clear that corruption is not the cause of the effort to oust Brazil’s twice-elected president; rather, corruption is merely the pretext. ...

http://www.theguardian.com/commenti...eff-enemies-impeached-brazil?CMP=share_btn_tw
 
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Frideswide

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The rise of BRIC and the empire to the north stirring trouble?

I have brazilian/serbian friends in Recife and they say that the tension is very very difficult.
 

ramonmercado

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Dilma Rousseff impeachment: Brazil threatens to descend into a disguised police state
The Brazilian senate has voted for Dilma Rousseff to be suspended from the presidency and begin her impeachment trial. Rousseff has called the process a “coup”, denying the charges against her.

The main basis for the impeachment is her alleged use of a campaign financing trick considered to be illegal, although previous administrations have used it unquestioningly. The political fact is that the president could no longer form a majority in parliament and she has had to face huge protests calling for her impeachment.

Never mind that the impeachment process was led by the president of the lower house, Eduardo Cunha, who is known to have secret accounts abroad, and who is being investigated for involvement in high corruption. As soon as Cunha had done his job in starting the impeachment, the Supreme Court removed him from his duties.

The senate vote that confirmed the impeachment was likewise led by a politician who faces corruption charges, Renan Calheiros, a former supporter of the government. ...

https://theconversation.com/dilma-r...o-descend-into-a-disguised-police-state-59341
 

ramonmercado

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The truth starts to emerge.

New Political Earthquake in Brazil: Is It Now Time for Media Outlets to Call This a “Coup”?

BRAZIL TODAY AWOKE to stunning news of secret, genuinely shocking conversations involving a key minister in Brazil’s newly installed government, which shine a bright light on the actual motives and participants driving the impeachment of the country’s democratically elected president, Dilma Rousseff. The transcripts were published by the country’s largest newspaper, Folha de São Paulo, and reveal secret conversations that took place in March, just weeks before the impeachment vote in the lower house was held. They show explicit plotting between the new planning minister (then-senator), Romero Jucá, and former oil executive Sergio Machado — both of whom are formal targets of the “Car Wash” corruption investigation — as they agree that removing Dilma is the only means for ending the corruption investigation. The conversations also include discussions of the important role played in Dilma’s removal by the most powerful national institutions, including — most importantly — Brazil’s military leaders.

The transcripts are filled with profoundly incriminating statements about the real goals of impeachment and who was behind it. The crux of this plot is what Jucá calls “a national pact” — involving all of Brazil’s most powerful institutions — to leave Michel Temer in place as president (notwithstanding his multiple corruption scandals) and to kill the corruption investigation once Dilma is removed. In the words of Folha, Jucá made clear that impeachment will “end the pressure from the media and other sectors to continue the Car Wash investigation.” Jucá is the leader of Temer’s PMDB party and one of the “interim president’s” three closest confidants. ...

https://theintercept.com/2016/05/23...w-time-for-media-outlets-to-call-this-a-coup/
 

ramonmercado

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The anti-corruption minister in Brazil's interim government has resigned, after a recording suggested he tried to derail an investigation into the state oil company, Petrobras.

Fabiano Silveira is the second interim minister to step down, a week after the planning minister resigned following the release of a similar recording.

Mr Silveira says his remarks have been taken out of context.

Both men were appointed by interim president, Michel Temer.

Mr Temer replaced Dilma Rousseff as president in 12 May, after she was suspended to face a Senate impeachment trial over allegations of massaging the budget ahead of her re-election in 2014.

She has argued that impeachment proceedings against her are designed to stop the investigation into Petrobras, known as Lava Jato, or Car Wash. ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-36414882
 

ramonmercado

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The two-thirds majority required to permanently oust President Rousseff from power may not be so easy to obtain.

At least three Brazilian Senators have told media outlets that they now regret voting in favor of an impeachment trial of President Dilma Rousseff.

Senators Romario, Acir Gurgacz, and Cristovam Buarque have recently revealed that they are reconsidering their support for the impeachment of Rousseff.

Senators voted 55 to 22 in May to continue with an impeachment trial, forcing Rousseff to temporarily step down from her post. For Rousseff to be permanently ousted, two-thirds of the Senate must vote in favor of impeachment at the conclusion of her trial.

A change of heart from only a few Senators would mean the two-thirds threshold would likely not be met, meaning Rousseff would return to power.

Senator Romario, a former soccer star who enjoyed support from progressive Brazilians, criticized the dramatic changes being implemented by the coup-imposed government of Michel Temer. ...

Video report at: http://www.telesurtv.net/english/ne...g-for-Rousseff-Impeachment-20160602-0052.html
 

ramonmercado

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Brazilian Tourism Minister Henrique Alves has resigned, after being linked to a corruption scandal.

He is the third minister to leave interim President Michel Temer's government.

All are implicated in a major corruption scandal at the state oil company Petrobras.

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court released testimony by an ex-executive implicating 20 politicians including Mr Temer. He denies the allegations.

In a television broadcast, Mr Temer dismissed the testimony as frivolous lies.

The allegations come from Sergio Machado, the former chief executive of Petrobras subsidiary Transpetro.

Mr Machado is himself under investigation and has made a plea bargain with prosecutors.

He said that both Mr Temer and Mr Alves asked him for money for electoral campaigning and knew it would come from an illegal kickbacks scheme that diverted billions of dollars from the national oil company.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-36556214?ocid=socialflow_twitter
 

ramonmercado

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Brazilian President Flees Official Residence Due to ‘Ghosts’
March 14, 2017 Brett Tingley

As we are thrust headlong into the ever-terrifying future, it’s natural that many heads of state would begin to feel the presence of the realms of the dead. After all, many governmental leaders – and governments themselves – are outdated, out-of-touch vestiges of a past pre-digital era. Some of the world’s current geopolitical conflicts can be seen as the death throes of an aging ruling class frightened by the ever-quickening rate of change in the world.

The skeletons in many country’s closets are now getting a chance to come out into the light, which certainly can spook bureaucrats who don’t want to come to terms with the ghosts of the past. Case in point: Brazilian President Michel Temer moved out of his country’s official presidential residence this week, telling reporters that evil spirits were afoot in the home. In an interview with Brazilian magazine Veja, Temer claims that the presence of these dark forces began to trouble him from the moment he stepped foot in the presidential mansion:

The Palace of Alvorada has a lot of rooms, about eight, all very large. Everything is ample and beautiful. But I felt something weird there. I wasn’t able to sleep since the first night. The energy was not good. Marcela felt the same thing. Only [(Michel’s son)] Michelzinho, who kept running back and forth, liked it. We started to think: is there a ghost? (laughs)

These “ghosts” got to the 76-year-old president and his 33-year-old wife that the pair moved out of the residence and back into the vice-president’s residence, Jaburu Palace. ...

http://mysteriousuniverse.org/2017/03/brazilian-president-flees-official-residence-due-to-ghosts/
 

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Brazilian President Flees Official Residence Due to ‘Ghosts’
March 14, 2017 Brett Tingley

As we are thrust headlong into the ever-terrifying future, it’s natural that many heads of state would begin to feel the presence of the realms of the dead. After all, many governmental leaders – and governments themselves – are outdated, out-of-touch vestiges of a past pre-digital era. Some of the world’s current geopolitical conflicts can be seen as the death throes of an aging ruling class frightened by the ever-quickening rate of change in the world.

The skeletons in many country’s closets are now getting a chance to come out into the light, which certainly can spook bureaucrats who don’t want to come to terms with the ghosts of the past. Case in point: Brazilian President Michel Temer moved out of his country’s official presidential residence this week, telling reporters that evil spirits were afoot in the home. In an interview with Brazilian magazine Veja, Temer claims that the presence of these dark forces began to trouble him from the moment he stepped foot in the presidential mansion:

The Palace of Alvorada has a lot of rooms, about eight, all very large. Everything is ample and beautiful. But I felt something weird there. I wasn’t able to sleep since the first night. The energy was not good. Marcela felt the same thing. Only [(Michel’s son)] Michelzinho, who kept running back and forth, liked it. We started to think: is there a ghost? (laughs)

These “ghosts” got to the 76-year-old president and his 33-year-old wife that the pair moved out of the residence and back into the vice-president’s residence, Jaburu Palace. ...

http://mysteriousuniverse.org/2017/03/brazilian-president-flees-official-residence-due-to-ghosts/

And how's his personal bank account been recently ? ... :rolleyes:
 

chicorea

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The after-coup running élite doesn't fear the "fast-changing world" at all. They found the perfect solution for this problem: throw the entire country in a decadence, making it slide back almost 50 years in the past, erasing all social, political, economical and cultural conquests of the XXth century. The future will take decades to make ripples in the XXith century Brazil.
 

ramonmercado

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The after-coup running élite doesn't fear the "fast-changing world" at all. They found the perfect solution for this problem: throw the entire country in a decadence, making it slide back almost 50 years in the past, erasing all social, political, economical and cultural conquests of the XXth century. The future will take decades to make ripples in the XXith century Brazil.

Now they want the poor to eat leftovers.

Plans to feed poor children reconstituted food made from leftovers near expiry have sparked a row in the Brazilian city of São Paulo.

The product, known as farinata from the Portuguese word for flour but dubbed "dog food" by critics, can be eaten as pellets or added to meals.

Mayor Joao Doria says it could curb hunger and cut food waste.

But critics have questioned its nutritional value and prosecutors have opened an inquiry into the plans.

Mr Doria said he had already authorised farinata's distribution to some schools to be used in meals "in a complementary form" from this month.

He described the pellets as "blessed food".

But the Regional Council of Nutritionists said they amounted to a violation of the right to adequate food.

"When we offer pellets to lower income people to eat, we are only exacerbating the inequality in society," spokeswoman Vivian Zollar said. ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-41698885#
 

chicorea

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Now they want the poor to eat leftovers.

Plans to feed poor children reconstituted food made from leftovers near expiry have sparked a row in the Brazilian city of São Paulo.

The product, known as farinata from the Portuguese word for flour but dubbed "dog food" by critics, can be eaten as pellets or added to meals.

Mayor Joao Doria says it could curb hunger and cut food waste.

But critics have questioned its nutritional value and prosecutors have opened an inquiry into the plans.

Mr Doria said he had already authorised farinata's distribution to some schools to be used in meals "in a complementary form" from this month.

He described the pellets as "blessed food".

But the Regional Council of Nutritionists said they amounted to a violation of the right to adequate food.

"When we offer pellets to lower income people to eat, we are only exacerbating the inequality in society," spokeswoman Vivian Zollar said. ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-41698885#

João Doria belongs to the worst kind of populist (and opportunist) politicians. He spreads the language (and administrates accordingly) of hatred for the poorer, calling them lazy, losers and throwing over them the whole responsability for their fate. He loves to brandish scapegoats and used the language of extermination and racial (and social) cleaning more than once.

I hate to (em)bark on political rants, but what I continually witness happening in my former country (and it was for more than 40 years) it's revolting and appaling, to say the less.

Thank you @ramonmercado, for letting people see what is happening and to make us see through your eyes the absurdities of the raise of fascism as a fortean phenomenon. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart.
 
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