Breastfeeding In Public

A

Anonymous

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#1
Apparently an MP is trying to push through a law to make it illegal to prevent a woman from breastfeeding in anywhere in public. So, for example, a restaurateur couldn't ask a woman whether she could she do this in the toilets or a baby changing room rather than in the middle of the restaurant.

The thinking behind this is based on the idea that 'breast is best' and the health benefits associated with breast-feeding.

Personally, I'm against this. I appreciate it's a natural bodily function, but so are many other things that I often have to put off from doing whilst in public.

Any thoughts?
 

escargot

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#2
I've breasfed babies in public and nobody even noticed.
It's an art. ;)
 
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Anonymous

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escargot1 said:
I've breasfed babies in public and nobody even noticed.
It's an art. ;)
Yes, but it's also a lost art to some. I've seen women make very overt - and unnecessary - displays of their breast-feeding.
 

MaxMolyneux

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#4
It's not like you've seen a breast before. :p

Wouldn't bother me if they need to feed their babies and if a public is offended then just kindly ask them to go to a public toilet to do it.
 
A

Anonymous

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#5
MaxMolyneux said:
It's not like you've seen a breast before. :p
That doesn't make sense, did you miss a word out?

Wouldn't bother me if they need to feed their babies and if a public is offended then just kindly ask them to go to a public toilet to do it.
The law that this particular MP wants to bring in would make it illegal to ask the woman to go into the toilet even if everyone present was offended.
 

MaxMolyneux

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#7
womaniac said:
MaxMolyneux said:
It's not like you've seen a breast before. :p
That doesn't make sense, did you miss a word out?

Wouldn't bother me if they need to feed their babies and if a public is offended then just kindly ask them to go to a public toilet to do it.
The law that this particular MP wants to bring in would make it illegal to ask the woman to go into the toilet even if everyone present was offended.
Oh yeah meant to say it's not like you havent seen a breast but you'd know what I mean. :p

Bad Law though.
 

Min Bannister

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#8
I wouldn't want to eat in a toilet! :cross eye I've never seen anyone breastfeeding in an "embarrassing" way and none of my friends have ever breastfed their children in anything but a discreet manner. But I'm wondering why it is so offensive for someone to be feeding their children when the covers of magazines and newspapers are full of women with their breasts hanging out!
 

Leaferne

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I've never seen a nursing mother be anything *but* discreet. It's not as though they pull their shirts up to their necks in the middle of a busy mall or restaurant and flash everyone. Breastfeeding is so good for babies and seems to head off a number of health issues so I suspect the real issue is the fact that breasts have become so sexualized. Page 3 girl with her surgically enhanced jugs out, no problem. Loving mum discreetly feeding baby, icky because (I would guess) the observers' own feelings about breasts as sexual objects come into play. I know a woman who stopped breastfeeding because her husband objected to it interfering with the couples' sex life and didn't like the state her breasts were in as a result of nursing.

And speaking of surgical enhancements, isn't loss of nipple sensation a possible side effect? So now they look "great" (according to artificial cultural standards) but they're erotically dead. :nooo: Some messed up priorities there, methinks.
 
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Anonymous

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#12
Leaferne said:
I've never seen a nursing mother be anything *but* discreet.
I think you've all been very lucky. My own experience is that whilst many mothers are discreet, over the last few years I've seen more and more young mothers become more overt as they've done this. I've honestly seen mothers rather than lift up a top, instead, pull a top's neckline down - which is anything but discreet.
 
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#13
min_bannister said:
I wouldn't want to eat in a toilet! :cross eye I've never seen anyone breastfeeding in an "embarrassing" way and none of my friends have ever breastfed their children in anything but a discreet manner. But I'm wondering why it is so offensive for someone to be feeding their children when the covers of magazines and newspapers are full of women with their breasts hanging out!
I'm with min on this - would you eat YOUR lunch in a toilet? If you don't like it, look away ffs. (BTW - I've seen far more offensive things - nose picking, arse scratching, whatever - those are nasty - breastfeeding is NATURAL)
 

MaxMolyneux

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#14
Leaferne said:
I've never seen a nursing mother be anything *but* discreet. It's not as though they pull their shirts up to their necks in the middle of a busy mall or restaurant and flash everyone. Breastfeeding is so good for babies and seems to head off a number of health issues so I suspect the real issue is the fact that breasts have become so sexualized. Page 3 girl with her surgically enhanced jugs out, no problem. Loving mum discreetly feeding baby, icky because (I would guess) the observers' own feelings about breasts as sexual objects come into play. I know a woman who stopped breastfeeding because her husband objected to it interfering with the couples' sex life and didn't like the state her breasts were in as a result of nursing.

And speaking of surgical enhancements, isn't loss of nipple sensation a possible side effect? So now they look "great" (according to artificial cultural standards) but they're erotically dead. :nooo: Some messed up priorities there, methinks.
I wouldn't want no beast nipple affected by these enhancements! :cry: :nooo:

Agree with that post though as breasts being sexualised could be the reason since stuff like page 3 realted things are more for private use.
 

svart

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#16
drbastard' said:
I don't really want to be made to feel awkward, on a train for example, and have to spend the whole time desperately trying to look in the opposite direction in case I get accused of gawping. :)
I guess you'd rather put up with a screaming hungry baby instead? :hmm:
 
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svart said:
drbastard' said:
I don't really want to be made to feel awkward, on a train for example, and have to spend the whole time desperately trying to look in the opposite direction in case I get accused of gawping. :)
I guess you'd rather put up with a screaming hungry baby instead? :hmm:
It's possible to put breast milk in a bottle.
 

svart

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#18
Hypothetical scenario: Breastfeeding mother plans a trip out in between feeds, no need to worry about sterilizing and packing bottle etc. because if there's an emergency she's got milk on tap. For whatever reason she is unable to make it home before the next feed.

Of course she must make her child wait, screaming, to the discomfort of other passengers just in case someone is offended at seeing a breast being used for what they are designed for. :)
 
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#20
womaniac said:
svart said:
drbastard said:
I don't really want to be made to feel awkward, on a train for example, and have to spend the whole time desperately trying to look in the opposite direction in case I get accused of gawping. :)
I guess you'd rather put up with a screaming hungry baby instead? :hmm:
It's possible to put breast milk in a bottle.
It's possible to close one's eyes, or look the other way.

Read a book, you don't have to look. :)
 

Leaferne

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#21
A nursing mother on a train is far less disturbing to me than someone with music on headphones so loud you can make out the song three rows away, someone speaking loudly on a cellphone, or someone with BO so bad they're fogging up the windows.
 

GNC

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#22
Leaferne said:
A nursing mother on a train is far less disturbing to me than someone with music on headphones so loud you can make out the song three rows away, someone speaking loudly on a cellphone, or someone with BO so bad they're fogging up the windows.
Yeah, sorry about that.
 

Min Bannister

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#23
So do all the people against breastfeeding in public also object to magazines, newspapers, advertisers, television programmes, films etc etc ad infinitum showing female breasts? Because that IS impossible to avoid. You try it. If not why not?
 

Anome

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#25
Leaferne said:
A nursing mother on a train is far less disturbing to me than someone with music on headphones so loud you can make out the song three rows away,
Actually, since I purchased my iPod, I have to say that I kind of understand the reasons for people having the volume up so loud.

The fact is, that without turning the volume up that loud, you can't actually hear anything, due to the background noise around you. And so, of course, everyone else gets annoyed at you for having the volume too loud.

I have to admit, though, I don't listen to too much music, mostly podcasts of people speaking, so the annoying drum noise should be less.
 

Anome

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#27
Xanatico said:
That's why you should wear headphones rather than crap little plugs.
I do, but now we're getting way off topic, and I'd like to see the conversation return to breasts.

So, breasts...great aren't they?
 

rynner2

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#29
Women may get right to breastfeed in public
Sarah-Kate Templeton, Health Correspondent

MINISTERS are considering new laws to give women a right to breastfeed their babies in public and take statutory breaks at work to suckle their infants.

The move follows research showing that only a minority of new mothers breastfeed their babies for the full six months recommended by the World Health Organisation.

It would become an offence for anyone to stop a woman from breastfeeding in public, a change that has already been enacted in Scotland. It follows complaints from mothers that they have been accused of indecency and barred from breastfeeding when they have attempted to do so in public.

Employers would also have to allow mothers to take breaks each working day to breast feed. In France women with a baby under 12 months are entitled to two 30-minute breaks a day. In Italy, new mothers can take two one-hour rest periods.

The proposals are central planks of a campaign by the five royal colleges of medicine, nursing and midwifery to which health minister Andy Burnham has signed up. He said he backed the campaign for a new policy on breast feeding in public and a new law on work breaks.

Caroline Flint, the public health minister, has already had a meeting with the coalition, which includes Unicef, the United Nations Children’s Fund, and will address doctors and midwives at the launch of its manifesto on Wednesday.

“All the evidence says that ‘nothing is fitter than a breastfed nipper’,” said Flint. “We’ve made good progress over the last 30 years encouraging more and more women to breastfeed. But we cannot be complacent. There are communities where breastfeeding rates remain low, adding to the health inequalities gap. We need to do more to close this and to ensure babies receive the best form of nutrition and to give them the best start in life.”

According to official figures, only 21% of British women breastfeed for up to the recommended period of six months.

Young mothers are particularly reluctant to breastfeed. A television advertising campaign will be launched this week by the Department of Health to encourage more mothers aged 25 and under to suckle their infants.

Rosie Dodds, policy and research officer for the National Childbirth Trust, said the statistics would improve if the government made it an offence to ask women to stop breastfeeding in public.

Lindsey Black, a 29-year-old mother of two from Southport, Merseyside, was asked to leave a branch of McDonald’s while breastfeeding her baby daughter in the restaurant. After twice being told to stop breastfeeding or leave, Black was forced to breastfeed in the lavatories.

“The older generation tend to tut-tut. I am not doing anything wrong — you do not see much,” said Black. “It is not as if I am lifting my top and exposing myself. The public need to be more understanding.”

The breastfeeding manifesto, which has been signed by more than 180 politicians including Margaret Hodge, the trade and industry minister, and Sir Menzies Campbell, the Liberal Democrat leader, says returning to work is the most common reason for women stopping breastfeeding.

The manifesto says: “We call on the government to legislate for breastfeeding breaks for women at work, in line with other European countries.”

Alison Baum, co-ordinator of the Breastfeeding Manifesto, said: “By ensuring that employers provide appropriate work schedules and places to allow women to continue breastfeeding, women could breastfeed for longer.

“Employers who are breast-feeding-friendly benefit in the long run because the babies of those mothers will end up having fewer bugs and suffering less illness. The parents will, therefore, have fewer absences.”

If companies had on-site crãches, women would take a break to breastfeed their child but, more commonly, they would express milk and store it for their baby to drink later.

Natalie Marshall, a mother of two from Wiltshire, is an IT support worker for a large manufacturing company and is allowed to takes two breastfeeding breaks a day. Marshall, who is still breastfeeding her two-year-old daughter and breastfed her three-year-old son until he was 14 months, said all companies should be as sympathetic as her employer.

“Those breaks were absolutely essential and without them I would not have managed to keep breastfeeding,” she said.

“It did add a bit of stress to the rest of the team because when I was having a break there were fewer people to respond to urgent problems, but they were all really supportive.”

Marshall expresses milk in a room provided by the occupational health department of the company. Her employer also provides a fridge for her to store it.

A legal entitlement to breastfeeding breaks is opposed, however, by the Confederation of British Industry and the Federation of Small Businesses.

McDonald’s said breastfeeding was allowed within its restaurants and that staff had been made aware of this policy.

http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life ... 782054.ece
 

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#30
Breast-feeding breaks? Can't quite see that one working, unless the women in question are bringing their babies into work with them?

Plus, I object to the 'breast is best' stuff. Some women cannot breastfeed. Not that some midwives accept that. Nevertheless, there are underweight, malnourished babies, simply due to the fact that the mother does not produce enough milk, or the quality of the milk is insufficient. Likewise, women for whom breastfeeding is just too damn painful. The bottom line here is that it's the mother's choice whether she breastfeeds, and if she choses not to, then she shouldn't be made to feel like she's guilty of cruelty to her own child.
 
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