But You Still Have Your Hair...

charliebrown

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The U.S. is being hit with climbing inflation like renting cars or buy cars, food, getting a hair cut, really everything has gotten more expensive.

A simple haircut is now U.S. 16 dollars or maybe 12 pounds.
 

charliebrown

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The one that gets me is people lining up for Starbucks Coffee at 4 dollars a cup or I guess 3 pounds.
 

hunck

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1. The closed-mouth smile

Most often, Russians smile only with their lips, only occasionally showing the upper row of teeth slightly. Revealing the top and bottom teeth is considered vulgar, as it resembles either an animal with bared teeth or a horse.

2. The “servant’s smile”

In Russian communication, a smile is not a signal of politeness. Russians consider a perpetual polite smile an “servant’s smile.” It is considered a demonstration of insincerity, secretiveness and unwillingness to show one’s true feelings.

3. The non-smile

In Russian communication, it is not acceptable to smile at strangers. Russians smile mainly at people they know. This is why salespeople do not smile at shoppers.

4. The responsive smile

Russians do not automatically respond to a smile with a smile. If an acquaintance responds to a smile with a smile, this is considered an invitation to come over and start a conversation.

5. The smile as a symbol of affection

A Russian smile demonstrates to the recipient that the smiling person has personal affection towards him or her. A smile directed at a stranger may elicit the reaction, “Do we know each other?”

6. The official’s non-smile

Among Russians it is not acceptable to smile while performing one’s job or any important business. Customs agents do not smile because they are occupied with serious business. This is the same for salespeople and waitstaff. It is not acceptable for children to smile in class. One of the most common remarks Russian teachers make is, “What are you smiling at? Write.”

7. The genuine smile

In the Russian collective consciousness, there is a rule: the smile must be a genuine reflection of a good mood and good relationship. In order to have the right to smile, one must truly like the person in question or be in a very good mood at the moment.

8. The smile with no reason

If a Russian person smiles, there should be a good reason behind it – and this reason should be known to everyone likely to witness the smile. If the reason for a smile is not clear, Russians may worry about the reason behind it.

9. The appropriate smile

The other people present must consider the smile to be appropriate for the context. It is not acceptable to smile in a difficult situation or if there are people around with known serious troubles, or if someone is ill or preoccupied with personal problems and so on.

10. A laugh as a smile

Among Russians there is a blurred line between a smile and laughter; in practice, these phenomena are often the same and are likened to each other.

Russians often say to people who are smiling, “What’s so funny?”
11. The FSB smile

A sardonic twist of the lips you see before you get the shit beaten out of you in a basement room by some muscly men with tatoos.
 

Nosmo King

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The U.S. is being hit with climbing inflation like renting cars or buy cars, food, getting a hair cut, really everything has gotten more expensive.

A simple haircut is now U.S. 16 dollars or maybe 12 pounds.
About the same this side of the pond, and that's just a simple grade cut with clippers
 

escargot

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The one that gets me is people lining up for Starbucks Coffee at 4 dollars a cup or I guess 3 pounds.
Someone I worked with bought her partner a Thermos flask for hot drinks and reckoned it saved them £200 a month. o_O
Seems you can do that if you stop buying two posh coffees a day when commuting.
 

Alchymist

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Getting back to tap water, or "municipal pop" as some of us called it; I lived in England for 30 years from 1944-74, mostly in South Cheshire, but also at various times in Essex, Sussex and Southampton. "Bottled water" would have been a strange concept, back then; for all purposes we used it straight from the tap, and thought nothing of it. I emigrated to Canada in'74, and lived in and around Vancouver, B.C. for about 15 years, then Saltspring Island, again for about 15 years, then the Kelowna area, in the Okanagan Valley (allegedly the home of Ogopogo, Canada's answer to Nessie); In all those places, again, I would drink tap water. My wife runs hers through a charcoal filter - she's diabetic, and has quite a few allergies, so just as a precaution - and some of our friends do drink bottled water - as do we, if we're away from home and thirsty, such as on a long drive. We occasionally get a "Boil water advisory" from the municipality after a long dry period.

Since I retired, we spend a few months of each winter in Mexico, a tiny fishing village on the Pacific coast, called La Manzanilla, about 4 hours south of Puerto Vallarta (not to be confused with ManzanillO, a big port city about an hour further south). In Mexico, you don't drink the tap water, or even brush your teeth with it, though it seems to be perfectly fine when boiled for tea, coffee or soup. Drinking water is delivered by pickup truck in 20-litre plastic containers called garrafons; the drill is, you put your empty garrafon out on the sidewalk, and sometime during the day someone will come tapping on your door with a shout of "Hola! Agua?", and with a full one over his, or her, shoulder. It costs 15-20 pesos, equivalent to about $1.00 or $1.20. In my more cynical moments I sometimes suspect it's simply water from someone else's tap, but we haven't had any major problems - yet. They probably run it through activated charcoal, but it doesn't seem to be chlorinated.

I'll be turning 77 next month, and I still have all my own teeth - minus one, which I had to have pulled when I was about 22 (I found it kind of strange that, over a period of about 18 months, the other teeth gradually migrated to fill the gap), and a few fillings. I also have most of my hair, and even a bit of colour (reddish blond; my nickname at school was Ginger or Red). If I let my beard grow it would be grey, though.

So what does all this prove? Nothing much, probably. Luck of the draw, I guess.
 

Nosmo King

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Getting back to tap water, or "municipal pop" as some of us called it; I lived in England for 30 years from 1944-74, mostly in South Cheshire, but also at various times in Essex, Sussex and Southampton. "Bottled water" would have been a strange concept, back then; for all purposes we used it straight from the tap, and thought nothing of it. I emigrated to Canada in'74, and lived in and around Vancouver, B.C. for about 15 years, then Saltspring Island, again for about 15 years, then the Kelowna area, in the Okanagan Valley (allegedly the home of Ogopogo, Canada's answer to Nessie); In all those places, again, I would drink tap water. My wife runs hers through a charcoal filter - she's diabetic, and has quite a few allergies, so just as a precaution - and some of our friends do drink bottled water - as do we, if we're away from home and thirsty, such as on a long drive. We occasionally get a "Boil water advisory" from the municipality after a long dry period.

Since I retired, we spend a few months of each winter in Mexico, a tiny fishing village on the Pacific coast, called La Manzanilla, about 4 hours south of Puerto Vallarta (not to be confused with ManzanillO, a big port city about an hour further south). In Mexico, you don't drink the tap water, or even brush your teeth with it, though it seems to be perfectly fine when boiled for tea, coffee or soup. Drinking water is delivered by pickup truck in 20-litre plastic containers called garrafons; the drill is, you put your empty garrafon out on the sidewalk, and sometime during the day someone will come tapping on your door with a shout of "Hola! Agua?", and with a full one over his, or her, shoulder. It costs 15-20 pesos, equivalent to about $1.00 or $1.20. In my more cynical moments I sometimes suspect it's simply water from someone else's tap, but we haven't had any major problems - yet. They probably run it through activated charcoal, but it doesn't seem to be chlorinated.

I'll be turning 77 next month, and I still have all my own teeth - minus one, which I had to have pulled when I was about 22 (I found it kind of strange that, over a period of about 18 months, the other teeth gradually migrated to fill the gap), and a few fillings. I also have most of my hair, and even a bit of colour (reddish blond; my nickname at school was Ginger or Red). If I let my beard grow it would be grey, though.

So what does all this prove? Nothing much, probably. Luck of the draw, I guess.
Whilst on holiday, in Puerto Vallarta, I was very careful with only using bottled water, one evening at a restaurant I had hiccups and, in a lapse of concentration, asked for a glass of water, I didn't even think about it, but regretted it for the next 2 days, I was very ill :(
 
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