California Fires: A Result Of Unknown Weapons?

Vardoger

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Santa Rosa & Northern CA Fires DEFY THE LAWS of PHYSICS (Where'd the houses go??)


Published on Oct 10, 2017
for eyes that can see, there is something wrong here, the melting/ burning point of common household materials like glass (2600℉) and stainless steel (2800℉) are DOUBLE the temperature of house and forest fires (1100℉) ... and you might expect Rod Sterling to pop out at any moment in this footage..bc it's like the Twilight Zone!!



Published on Oct 10, 2017
how did an open air fire erase all materials and contents of these homes?? these properties do not demonstrate the products of a natural open air house fire: there is twisted metal and near complete disintegration of all materials regardless of melting/burning points.


 
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Ulalume

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Hmm. These fires are in Northern California which - I think - doesn't usually burn as extensively every year as Southern California does. San Francisco had insanely hot temperatures this summer. I'm guessing some combination of unusual weather conditions and geography could have contributed.

Do we have any Californians on the board who might know?
 

GNC

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I did read Charles M. Schulz's house burned down, because it's been that kind of week.
 

Victory

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Was barely a thing left inside Grenfell too though.

Perhaps the preponderence of gadgets (microwave ovens, tvs, computers, tablets, dvd collections) and lightweight wickable sports clothing in first world homes has changed the average temperature and duration of fires and how much damage is been caused compared to the late 20th century?

Maybe a lot of those Californian houses had significantly more wood in their structures compared to the average home in a British city?

Throw in years of drought causing very dry combustable vegetation and you have fires burning hotter than otherwise expected?
 

INT21

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The houses disappeared because most of them were made of wood.

No mystery here folks, move along.

INT21
 

kamalktk

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<skips to random point in video> 10:40 of that video "Where are the steel beams that held that house together?"

There aren't any, almost all housing construction in America is wood frame.
 

Ulalume

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I did read Charles M. Schulz's house burned down, because it's been that kind of week.
And Santa Rosa is the location for my favorite Hitchcock film, too.

Good point @kamalktk. I wasn't even thinking of that, I've rarely seen steel beams in house construction.
 

Timble2

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Also the houses that she shows that haven't burned to the ground are ones where the fire fighters have been able to tackle the fire. Any metal items that have survived would have dropped into the basement, if there is one, or are covered by what debris there is. And some household appliances would fall apart in a fire, without a the metal components actually melting.
 

Anonymous-50446

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Also the houses that she shows that haven't burned to the ground are ones where the fire fighters have been able to tackle the fire. Any metal items that have survived would have dropped into the basement, if there is one, or are covered by what debris there is. And some household appliances would fall apart in a fire, without a the metal components actually melting.
Depends on the metal. Temperatures can reach very high levels with plenty of forced air, e.g. in high winds, so it's perfectly feasible for copper wire to have melted and also, if winds are high, for any aluminium (window frames or such) to have caught fire and once that catches it'll burn to powder. And burn hot too.
 

Vardoger

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If fires gets too warm, everything will burn down if it gets the chance.
 

Austin Popper

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There is not much metal in things like dishwashers these days. I can speak to the building material question too, since I spent too many summers on framing crews. We use lots of "engineered lumber" these days, and anyone who does framing is thankful for that. Products like Paralam (aka Microlam aka LVL) have replaced pretty much all the structural steel in single-family residences, even the colossal ones. It has a lot of epoxy type resins in it. It's cheaper than steel, can be cut with ordinary carpentry tools, and fastening is with screws and nails instead of welding, bolts, and "powder actuated" blammo nails. (You just can't get away from the gun culture here. It's as sad as it looks from afar.)

Even tornadoes can level towns to the point it's hard to believe there was ever much there. Then there is the wildfire mutation known as a firestorm, scary shit. That's when superheated air precedes any actual flame, and it's hot enough to cause trees to burst into flame. Those are nearly impossible to deal with. I've never been anywhere near one, fortunately, but they sound and look apocalyptic.
 

AlchoPwn

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As any Australian knows, the cause of the Californian fires are the result of the idiots planting huge numbers of Eucalyptus or Gum trees. Such trees thrive on fire and actively promote it with their resins. Australia has immense fires on a regular basis as part of its natural ecosystem... Now translate that to North America and you will see that the Eucalypts will out-compete the native species through this underhand method. Of course this isn't a form of Climate Change Denial, don't get me wrong, I'm sure that plays a part as well.
 

Cynical Apathist

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The fires were driven by 100+ kph foehn winds and single digit humidities, combined with abnormally dry vegetation. The winds blew trees and branches into powerlines, leading to multiple ignitions that overwhelmed local resources. The fires started at night when firefighting aircraft do not fly.
The homes are not exclusively made of wood. Paint, plastics, carpeting, furniture, et al contributed to the fuel.
I am not sure how many eucalypts were planted in that area. They were a popular landscaping tree decades ago, but are now out of favor for several reasons.
Another speculation is although California has tough fire building codes and new development regulations, local planning commissions often grant variances and waivers to developers, citing trying to keep housing costs down. Not sure how much that played a part in the home losses. However, Ventura County in Southern California has similar fire conditions and historically only a fraction of the homes lost as other counties. Ventura County has local codes even tougher than the statewide, does not grant variances, and codes are aggressively enforced.

Ordinary forest fires will soften steel. Roadside barriers and metal towers commonly soften and collapse in ordinary vegetation fires.

Lawsuits are already filed against the utility company claiming they did not properly maintain clearances from powerlines.
 

Vardoger

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One of the California fires caught starting on a surveillance camera. Notice the large orb in the background on the horizon. After a while it turns itself off and to the left of it, it suddenly starts to burn(you can see the smoke). Doubt it's a weapon. People speculate it's the orb which started the fire.


Also mention on the Daily Mail.
 
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Ringo

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One of the California fires caught starting on a surveillance camera. Notice the large orb in the background on the horizon. After a while it turns itself off and to the left of it, it suddenly starts to burn(you can see the smoke). Doubt it's a weapon. People speculate it's the orb which started the fire.


Also mention on the Daily Mail.
The vid is obviously a time lapse. The "orb" that goes out is probably some facility or building which has its lights turned off - maybe because they were warned that the fire was coming closer. The fire appears on the horizon and takes a while to grow. it seems to go quickly due to the time lapse.
 
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