Cases That No Longer Seem As Good As You Once Thought

BS3

Abominable Showman
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Everyone likes to discuss their most convincing or favourite UFO cases, but how about those which no longer seem as compelling as you once thought?

My own top two of this type are firstly, Teheran 1976, which increasingly seems like it could be one of those cases where a series of fairly mundane things occurs in an almost improbably coincidental order (see also Manises, 1979).

The other is the 1973 Mansfield, Ohio helicopter case, which now that I've revised my view of just how much witnesses can misperceive stuff, seems like it might have been a bolide.

Any more former personal favourites?
 

Zeke Newbold

Carbon based biped.
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Two come to mind:

The Warminster UFO flap of 1965.

I read Arthur Shuttlewood's The Warminster Mystery (!967) as a kid and took it all as gospel. With historical perspective the event doesn't look quite so impressive: the George Faulkner photo - which apparently was what got Shuttlewood interested in the first place has since - pretty much - been exposed as yet another fake.

The residents themselves referred to the phenomena as `The thing` rather than specifying UFOs - and indeed it includes such things as odd roaring noises and orbs of light. All of these now would be more likely to be viewed as some sort of localised natural phenomenon - such as plasma balls and the like.

Then there is the fact that there is a military base very close to the town.

Shuttlewood's role seems to account for a lot of the local `hysteria` or `concern` (choose which word you prefer) which arose around this - as being an influential journalist-cum-believer he acted as the conduit for it all much in the way that Alex Campbell did with the Loch Ness Monster in its early days.

The other one is `The Sirius Mystery` as promoted by Robert Temple. I once saw this as the Gold Standard of `paleo-SETI` and something that had to be reckoned with even if you saw through Von Daniken's rash claims. Then I read his 1997 reworking of the book and was niot impressed. It struck me as the work as a clearly highly intelligent and yet self-centered obscurantist crank.

There does seem to be evidence that the Dogon tribe had sufficient contact with the West to be able to know that Sirius B existed (this being the central `Sirius Mystery` around which Temple's whole series of claim revolves). Also - and this is from memory so correct me if I'm wrong - Temple claims that there is a Sirius C too- which the Dogon's also apparently knew about ( a real clinching argument!) - but the existence of a third sun has since been shown to be mistaken - I think I'm right in saying.

Edit to add: Feel free to re-enthuse me about these cases if you think you can. Sometimes one can be wrong about being wrong!
 
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Coal

The Ultimate Skepticus
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The other one is `The Sirius Mystery` as promoted by Robert Temple. I once saw this as the Gold Standard of `paleo-SETI` and something that had to be reckoned with even if you saw through Von Daniken's rash claims. Then I read his 1997 reworking of the book and was niot impressed. It struck me as the work as a clearly highly intelligent and yet self-centered obscurantist crank.
Agree with you on this.
 

JamesWhitehead

Piffle Prospector
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Information, way back, dripped or trickled in. It could stop, completely.

Our imaginations went to work.

The relentless ever-present of the Web has rubbed a lot of it out.

So we get a bit irritated, when folk cling to their emotional-support phantoms.

'Tis the story of this board in a nutshell! :dunno:
 

Coal

The Ultimate Skepticus
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Tbh nearly everything Fortean around in the early 1980's is still at the same stage as they were then. No progress. I take the Baysian view.
 

Paul_Exeter

Justified & Ancient
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Rendlesham.

Oh to have been out there on those cold December nights. However, it has been pointed out by Dr David Clarke and others that at no time were the UK's air defences mobilised during the entire Rendlesham affair. This is despite the US base storing nuclear weapons and all the claims of unknown arial craft sending down lights and basically interfering with an extremely important and strategic NATO base at the height of the Cold War.

Dr David Clarke did a very good job in dismantling the whole affair on this podcast:

https://audioboom.com/posts/7883148...th-dr-david-clarke?playlist_direction=forward

I know he is a controversial figure in Ufological circles but it is essential listening as he explodes so many of the myths that have grown up around this case.
 

BS3

Abominable Showman
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Rendlesham.

Oh to have been out there on those cold December nights. However, it has been pointed out by Dr David Clarke and others that at no time were the UK's air defences mobilised during the entire Rendlesham affair. This is despite the US base storing nuclear weapons and all the claims of unknown arial craft sending down lights and basically interfering with an extremely important and strategic NATO base at the height of the Cold War.

Dr David Clarke did a very good job in dismantling the whole affair on this podcast:

https://audioboom.com/posts/7883148...th-dr-david-clarke?playlist_direction=forward

I know he is a controversial figure in Ufological circles but it is essential listening as he explodes so many of the myths that have grown up around this case.

I did wonder whether Rendlesham would appear in this thread. As originally presented, the evidence seemed quite remarkable.

Following the work carried out on the case by @Comfortably Numb and others it now seems clear that the witnesses were likely misinterpreting a series of mundane things - as often happens in UFO cases - unless there is an element of truth to the 'spy film drop' theory.
 

Paul_Exeter

Justified & Ancient
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I did wonder whether Rendlesham would appear in this thread. As originally presented, the evidence seemed quite remarkable.

Following the work carried out on the case by @Comfortably Numb and others it now seems clear that the witnesses were likely misinterpreting a series of mundane things - as often happens in UFO cases - unless there is an element of truth to the 'spy film drop' theory.

Here os a summary of the spy film drop theory, complete with an image of the capsule:

https://www.coasttocoastam.com/article/could-this-capsule-explain-the-rendlesham-ufo-incident/

I must have overlooked this when it first surfaced and it does have some merit
 

BS3

Abominable Showman
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Here os a summary of the spy film drop theory, complete with an image of the capsule:

https://www.coasttocoastam.com/article/could-this-capsule-explain-the-rendlesham-ufo-incident/

I must have overlooked this when it first surfaced and it does have some merit

I've seen it referenced by a few people and it does certainly have some convincing aspects. One of the main ones is that the Iran hostage crisis was going on at the time of the 1980 incident, so there is every reason to think there might have been additional espionage activity in the same timeframe.
 
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