Cats & People—What Are They Like?!

brownmane

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friend of mine recently mentioned that her fourteen-year-old cat Polo has begun to whine and cry at times for no apparent reason.
Another thing that senior cats are prone to is hyperthyroidism. The cat loses weight and can become very loud and vocal. My one cat was a 17 lb and had in her senior years dropped to 11 lbs. She cried all the time and was hungry. Her fur was not as thick nor shiny as it had been. I had blood work and found that she had hyperthyroidism. It can be treated similarly to the way people are treated. The easiest method to control it is daily medication. Once she started the medication, she stopped her incessent crying.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Another thing that senior cats are prone to is hyperthyroidism. The cat loses weight and can become very loud and vocal. My one cat was a 17 lb and had in her senior years dropped to 11 lbs. She cried all the time and was hungry. Her fur was not as thick nor shiny as it had been. I had blood work and found that she had hyperthyroidism. It can be treated similarly to the way people are treated. The easiest method to control it is daily medication. Once she started the medication, she stopped her incessent crying.
Yep Stormy and before she died Mally had this - good point.
 

escargot

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I had been about to suggest that you reassert your ownership by spraying in every corner yourself.

OK, it would not have helped the smell but, if you can't beat them . . .

It's a good job I am not a cat-owner! :evil:
I recently bought a UV torch. You shine it around in the dark and it makes urine stains light up so you can enjoy deal with them.

Haven't yet dared use it here. Three cats, one very elderly, every cat in the area strolling in to steal food and spray, and let's face it, I'm not getting any younger myself...
 

ramonmercado

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Cat identified after 12 years.

A cat that went missing from a Greater Manchester family while they were on holiday on the shores of Loch Lomond has been located 12 years later.

Tortoiseshell-and-white Georgie spent October half-term with her owners at the Rowardennen campsite in 2008 before vanishing as they were due to return home.

Despite searching the site, the three-year-old feline was nowhere to be found, with the Davies family hoping she would be located by someone and contacted through the cat’s microchip. Georgie remained close to the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park site after her family departed – being fed and cared for by campsite staff and holidaymakers coming and going over the years.

When the coronavirus pandemic hit and lockdown restrictions were imposed in the area, a concerned campsite staff member came across the cat and finally discovered its Rochdale origin after the chip was scanned by an animal charity.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/peopl...h-lomond-after-being-missing-12-years-2932946
 

Lb8535

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Cat identified after 12 years.

A cat that went missing from a Greater Manchester family while they were on holiday on the shores of Loch Lomond has been located 12 years later.

Tortoiseshell-and-white Georgie spent October half-term with her owners at the Rowardennen campsite in 2008 before vanishing as they were due to return home.

Despite searching the site, the three-year-old feline was nowhere to be found, with the Davies family hoping she would be located by someone and contacted through the cat’s microchip. Georgie remained close to the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park site after her family departed – being fed and cared for by campsite staff and holidaymakers coming and going over the years.

When the coronavirus pandemic hit and lockdown restrictions were imposed in the area, a concerned campsite staff member came across the cat and finally discovered its Rochdale origin after the chip was scanned by an animal charity.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/peopl...h-lomond-after-being-missing-12-years-2932946
So - they take their cat camping. Having had the cat wander off to enjoy itself, they don't call back the campsite every week or so to see if it's turned up. This goes on for 12 years. And they gave the cat back why?
 

escargot

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So - they take their cat camping. Having had the cat wander off to enjoy itself, they don't call back the campsite every week or so to see if it's turned up. This goes on for 12 years. And they gave the cat back why?
The cat is chipped but in all that time nobody took it to a vet to have checked. Something's not right.
 

Naughty_Felid

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I recently bought a UV torch. You shine it around in the dark and it makes urine stains light up so you can enjoy deal with them.

Haven't yet dared use it here. Three cats, one very elderly, every cat in the area strolling in to steal food and spray, and let's face it, I'm not getting any younger myself...
My torch arrived last month - the good thing it wasn't half as bad as I thought it was.
 

GingerTabby

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Another thing that senior cats are prone to is hyperthyroidism. The cat loses weight and can become very loud and vocal. My one cat was a 17 lb and had in her senior years dropped to 11 lbs. She cried all the time and was hungry. Her fur was not as thick nor shiny as it had been. I had blood work and found that she had hyperthyroidism. It can be treated similarly to the way people are treated. The easiest method to control it is daily medication. Once she started the medication, she stopped her incessent crying.
Thanks brownmane! That's a good point.
 

brownmane

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As I understand some of what TNR theory of control is that feral colonies are territorial and if you have a managed colony in an area, other feral cats stay away. Don't know if that is true.

However, having grown up on a farm, I can't tell you how many strays were just dropped off from thoughtless and selfish owners. Definitely not feral as the cats were not afraid of people. They have little chance of surviving as they have not been raised to know how to hunt nor are they conditioned to outdoor elements. Sad and it angers me more than feral cat pops.
 

Naughty_Felid

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As I understand some of what TNR theory of control is that feral colonies are territorial and if you have a managed colony in an area, other feral cats stay away. Don't know if that is true.

However, having grown up on a farm, I can't tell you how many strays were just dropped off from thoughtless and selfish owners. Definitely not feral as the cats were not afraid of people. They have little chance of surviving as they have not been raised to know how to hunt nor are they conditioned to outdoor elements. Sad and it angers me more than feral cat pops.
Strays can survive and turn into semi-ferals, but as you say not all do. They can also be easily rehabilitated to live with humans again.

We are having this issue at the moment.

Mally was put to sleep. she was the matriarch. We actually didn't realize the influence she had on the other cats.

Koi- cat (Ko'eee) Alpha male went a bit bonkers after this and started bullying the other cats particularly Mum.

Mum started running off for a day or so. I booked leave to start a behavioral program to sort out this dissent in the family. Before I could start this Mum ran off and has not come back -10 days now.

She is living in Scrub/woodland behind houses approx 0. 25km She has been spotted. She was semi-feral/ a dumped stray when we trapped her so has gone back to living rough.

Her Son Ted is fine but gone for long periods during the day - I'm certain he knows where she is and visits her but he's keeping tight-lipped about her exact location.

We've set up a trap in the backyard of a house she's been spotted in but, we've only managed to trap 3 neighbors cats so we've had to ditch that plan. Ditto leaving food out. We can't go into the wooded area as A) she never used to come anyway when called and B) The owners are keen to maintain their privacy.

We've even set up a security cam watching the capt flap and I've been sleeping on the couch with a torch to see if she sneaks in. It's particularly sad due to the starving wretches both her and her son were when we trapped them and watching her blossom and put on weight.

Koi was taken to vets for a dental and his liver functions are terrible he is 7 in great shape - this might have played a part in why he has been so irritable and that doesn't look good - further tests are being done.

The wife is gutted and depressed as she hasn't had an animal just up and leave before.

It's an unfortunate part of adopting strays and semi-ferals.
 
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Lb8535

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Strays can survive and turn into semi-ferals, but as you say not all do. They can also be easily rehabilitated to live with humans again.

We are having this issue at the moment.

Mally was put to sleep. she was the matriarch. We actually didn't realize the influence she had on the other cats.

Koi- cat (Ko'eee) Alpha male went a bit bonkers after this and started bullying the other cats particularly Mum.

Mum started running off for a day or so. I booked leave to start a behavioral program to sort out this dissent in the family. Before I could start this Mum ran off and has not come back -10 days now.

She is living in Scrub/woodland behind houses approx 0. 25km She has been spotted. She was semi-feral/ a dumped stray when we trapped her so has gone back to living rough.

Her Son Ted is fine but gone for long periods during the day - I'm certain he knows where she is and visits her but he's keeping tight-lipped about her exact location.

We've set up a trap in the backyard of a house she's been spotted in but, we've only managed to trap 3 neighbors cats so we've had to ditch that plan. Ditto leaving food out. We can't go into the wooded area as A) she never used to come anyway when called and B) The owners are keen to maintain their privacy.

We've even set up a security cam watching the capt flap and I've been sleeping on the couch with a torch to see if she sneaks in. It's particularly sad due to the starving wretches both her and her son were when we trapped them and watching her blossom and put on weight.

Koi was taken to vets for a dental and his liver functions are terrible he is 7 in great shape - this might have played a part in why he has been so irritable and that doesn't look good - further tests are being done.

The wife is gutted and depressed as she hasn't had an animal just up and leave before.

It's an unfortunate part of adopting strays and semi-ferals.
Sympathies. For what it's worth, I would ask the wooded area people if it's OK to set traps at the perimeter of their space and just keep dumping whoever gets trapped until the right cat went in. When it gets colder they may be more willing to risk for food. I've adopted semi-feral cats, and although it's a real pain, turning them into indoor cats may be a lot easier on you in the long run.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Sympathies. For what it's worth, I would ask the wooded area people if it's OK to set traps at the perimeter of their space and just keep dumping whoever gets trapped until the right cat went in. When it gets colder they may be more willing to risk for food. I've adopted semi-feral cats, and although it's a real pain, turning them into indoor cats may be a lot easier on you in the long run.
One of the neighbors asked us to remove the trap after her cat got caught overnight. Not much else we can do really. We are trying to keep these people on our side as they've allowed us in their gardens a lot during the last week. It's suburbia that backs onto woodland, scrub, etc.

I've adopted/lived with 16 cats over the years right across the board. Most I would class as semi-feral, mostly kittens from semi-feral mums. Two were feral kittens from a very feral mother, (good name for a rock band).
 
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brownmane

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@Naughty_Felid, adopting and caring for any type of feral is hard work. I'm glad you enjoy doing that.

It is a big shake up when any cat in the group dies. The hierarchy is reset and the cats start tussling, if not outright fighting amongst themselves. The older, weaker cats have the most difficult time as they are easily ousted.

Mum might return when things have settled but she'll still have to establish a place. She may even get closer to you as you offer her the safety and security she needs more as a senior cat.

I hope she comes back.
 

Comfortably Numb

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...and came across this magic collection of cats being adorably :evil:...
Have to laugh at the cat and the cuckoo clock (1:18 in the video).

Just know it's thinking, 'you do that one more time.. you come out again and take the mickey... I swear I'm having you, nest and all...'.

"George, do you think we should put the clock higher up, in case the cat tries to pull it down"?

"Marge, it's a cat, not a a flippin' gazelle"...

Cat thinking... 'well you forget about close proximity of settee and if I take off from that nearest armrest, then by my calculations...'.
:onick:
 
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