Cats & People—What Are They Like?!

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One of our cats Pris who is semi-feral, (had a true feral mum when they were trapped), gets very long nails that have to be cut every 5 weeks. I'm the only one who can hold her and there's only one vet who can put her at ease to cut them. To trap her inside with have an elaborate ritual of closing the catflap from outside.

Once done her whole demeanor changes as her nails are quite painful. She becomes happy and placid. I find once you sort out the various ailments of the "wildys" (wild cats) they become a lot more manageable and nicer to live with. If he's ripping his claws out, (not just the dead outer keratin), then he needs to be taken in.

Easier said than done I know but worth it a he'll be easier to be around.
yeah............i know what you're saying, but he works himself up into such a spitting fury even when you try and unprise his claws caught in the settee.. Like your cat, i'm the only one allowed to stroke or play with him, but picking him up is probably a step too far barring buying some chain mail gloves He actually lets me play with his paws but getting him physically to a vet and finding one with the necessary life insurance required to deal with the fruitloop, i'm not so sure - we reckon they'd have to sedate him. I fed him a some tinned salmon today and a bit dropped on his head. Would he let me get it off? 10 minutes of him going berserk for some reason - I mean i'm allowed to touch his head without a lump of salmon on it! We've had 2 days of him forcing himself into a cardboard box he's too fat to fit in - won't go near us - its food and his box. Before he was quite happy laying full length on the settee
 

Lb8535

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I lived for many years with a cat who had been abused before I adopted her. She recovered mostly but claw-cutting was not possible. Once a month I took her to a professional groomer for the claws, where she was no trouble at all. I think it's because her carrier sat on a table surrounded by other tables to which a dog was tethered waiting for its shampoo and cut. Worked out fine at least for me, and she was glad to get out of there.
 

Naughty_Felid

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yeah............i know what you're saying, but he works himself up into such a spitting fury even when you try and unprise his claws caught in the settee.. Like your cat, i'm the only one allowed to stroke or play with him, but picking him up is probably a step too far barring buying some chain mail gloves He actually lets me play with his paws but getting him physically to a vet and finding one with the necessary life insurance required to deal with the fruitloop, i'm not so sure - we reckon they'd have to sedate him. I fed him a some tinned salmon today and a bit dropped on his head. Would he let me get it off? 10 minutes of him going berserk for some reason - I mean i'm allowed to touch his head without a lump of salmon on it! We've had 2 days of him forcing himself into a cardboard box he's too fat to fit in - won't go near us - its food and his box. Before he was quite happy laying full length on the settee
We used to corner Pris, then a big blanket over the top of her and we used a dog carrier at one point as it was easier to throw her in. Yes, I've used a couple of pairs of heavy-duty gardening gloves too.

The first 3 or 4 times were a nightmare, we had to sedate her each time. The vet told us she was one of the worst cats they had on the books she had the top star rating, (the stars were on her records to warn unsuspecting vets).

It does get easier. Either they get used to it, they just slow down, they just feel physically better, or a combination. I'm not trying to tell you what to do. Just let you know I been where you are.

I like the salmon on the head bit :D:nails:
 

Lb8535

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The cat mentioned above, Emma, claw-cutting, slept nicely curled up at the bottom of the bed. I pointed this out as proper behavior many times to the other cat, more senior, who felt it necessary to sleep on the pillow and frequently under the covers (he was born in California and now lived in New Jersey - couldn't stand winters). When the senior cat died, Emma waited a few nights, apparently realized she was now senior cat, and moved immediately to the pillow.
 

Megadeth1977

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But will we ever see a Guncat or Sheepcat?

Cats rival dogs on many tests of social smarts. But is anyone brave enough to study them?
By David GrimmMay. 9, 2019 , 2:00 PM

CORVALLIS, OREGON—Carl the cat was born to beat the odds. Abandoned on the side of the road in a Rubbermaid container, the scrawny black kitten—with white paws, white chest, and a white, skunklike stripe down his nose—was rescued by Kristyn Vitale, a postdoc at Oregon State University here who just happens to study the feline mind. Now, Vitale hopes Carl will pull off another coup, by performing a feat of social smarts researchers once thought was impossible.

In a stark white laboratory room, Vitale sits against the back wall, flanked by two overturned cardboard bowls. An undergraduate research assistant kneels a couple of meters away, holding Carl firmly.

"Carl!" Vitale calls, and then points to one of the bowls. The assistant lets go.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/201...-social-smarts-anyone-brave-enough-study-them
 

brownmane

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But will we ever see a Guncat or Sheepcat?

Cats rival dogs on many tests of social smarts. But is anyone brave enough to study them?
By David GrimmMay. 9, 2019 , 2:00 PM

CORVALLIS, OREGON—Carl the cat was born to beat the odds. Abandoned on the side of the road in a Rubbermaid container, the scrawny black kitten—with white paws, white chest, and a white, skunklike stripe down his nose—was rescued by Kristyn Vitale, a postdoc at Oregon State University here who just happens to study the feline mind. Now, Vitale hopes Carl will pull off another coup, by performing a feat of social smarts researchers once thought was impossible.

In a stark white laboratory room, Vitale sits against the back wall, flanked by two overturned cardboard bowls. An undergraduate research assistant kneels a couple of meters away, holding Carl firmly.

"Carl!" Vitale calls, and then points to one of the bowls. The assistant lets go.
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/201...-social-smarts-anyone-brave-enough-study-them
a great article. Most cat lovers will already know much of this about cats, but it has to be proven scientifically. And we all know that if a cat doesn't want to do something, good luck getting him/her to comply. One of the reasons I love cats...they have their own minds.
 

hunck

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Woman takes in stray cat stuck in her garden

The unnamed woman, from Richmond, VA, in the US, shared photos of the animal on Craigslist, asking if anyone had lost a cat.

She wrote: "FOUND cat last night was stuck in between my fence screaming its head off. I brought it inside because it looks too big and healthy for a stray and dogs here escape often and will eat cats that get out.

"It is very thick and has little stripes and spots on its legs and big white round spots on the back of its ears, only thing that looks wrong with him is he doesn't have a tail, but it doesn't seem like anything new.
She's informed it's a bobcat & to let it go pronto, which she does, but not before it's pissed all over her house.


 
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