Charity Shop & Poundshop Finds

JamesWhitehead

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Bought 1 x LP & 17 x DVDs, Chadderton 08.09.2018, total price, £5.50
5883.S: Wolf-Ferrari: Il Segreto di Susanna, complete, Chiara, Weikl, Godknow, ROHCG, Gardelli, r. 02.1976, Kingsway Hall, Decca SET 617
2475.D: Desperately Seeking Susan, 1985, dir. Susan Seidelman, 99'15" ana. 1.78:1, + Comm. + Alt. Ending, 6'08" + Trailer, 1'58"
2476.D: Backbeat, 1993, dir. Iain Softley, 96'20" ana. 1.80:1 + dir. Comm. + Interviews, Deleted Scenes, c 66' Galleries, Essay.
2477.D: Angel Heart, 1987, dir. Alan Parker, 108'15" ana. 1.85:1, + dir. Comm, + Intro. + Interviews, Voodoo docs, Profiles, Trailer etc, c 75'
2478.D: The Crazies, 1973, dir George Romero, 98'48" ana. 1.66:1, + dir. Comm. + Interview, 13'58" Galleries, Trailers.
2479.D: Hope & Glory, 1987, dir. John Boorman, 108'06" ana. 1.78:1, bare-bones
2480.D: Cloud Atlas, 2012, dir. L. & A. Warchovsky & Tykver, 164'55" ana. scope, st. + Special Featurette, 6'58"
2481-91.D: Breaking Bad, tv series, Seasons 1, 2 & 3, 33 episodes, 2008 - 10, 1511' total, ana. 1.78:1, st. + Extras

Despite rain and the promise of more, I popped up to Shaw for a mooch down the High Street. Drew a blank, though the Asda coughed up a box of gin-pimping spices - mentioned recently on another thread - and some runner-beans. Total price £0.90!

Looping back via Chadderton, I often omit the RSPCA-shop, because it means crossing a busy road. Today I made the effort and hit paydirt.

The LP was welcome because I last spotted a copy when I was flat-broke and unaccountably elected to spend the dosh on food instead. The cover constitutes a spoiler in itself, as that minx Susanna is hiding a crafty fag behind her back. It is a wisp of a piece and lasts barely an hour but the Decca issue was lavishly-presented with a complete libretto and translation in a decent size format! I note that it also features a rare chance to hear Omar Godknow - Decca's sobriquet, whenever a novelty part was taken by a producer or another artist faking a voice.

The DVDs were all in nice condition with a standard price of 3 for £1. The set was £2.50 for 11 discs, so even cheaper!

I saw Desperately Seeking Susan in the cinema, when it was new and later when it turned up on tv, learning later that it was essentially a version of Rivette's Céline et Julie. A few years ago, I picked up the DVD, only to find a different one was in the case! I have not been desperately seeking it since but it is nice to fill the gap.

Backbeat turned up in a slip-sleeved edition, complete with commentary and extras, more than I expected for a low-budget version of The Beatles story. A VHS version confirmed that the music had been tweaked for a more punkish yoof market in the early nineties, presumably missing that while offending the purists. It was shown once in a Channel Four double-bill with The Hours & the Times, a moody piece that toyed with the notion of Lennon & Epstein as an item. It was once on Youtube, I think, but no more!

Alan Parker's New Orleans-set Neo-Noir was too weird for the mass market Parker hoped to attract with De Niro on the posters. Wait a minute, it was really a Mickey Rourke picture, wasn't it? Maybe it did well in France. I saw it once ages ago in a tv presentation that may have been trimmed. Time to give it another go.

I have never seen The Crazies. The version which commonly shows up in the slush-piles is a remake. I expect the 1973 original to be rough-and-ready. At least this seems to be drawn from official sources with a Romero Commentary track etc.

The recent death of Burt Reynolds reminds me that I have neglected John Boorman as a director, apart from Point Blank, Hell in the Pacific, Deliverance and The General. I should catch up on Excalibur, The Emerald Forest, that daft one with the floating head etc. Meanwhile, here is his 1987 WWII picture, Hope & Glory.

Cloud Atlas is dipping into much more recent territory, an expensive film from 2012 which weaves together multiple narratives under three directors. I'm expecting a feast of CGI but not much food for thought; I would like to be wrong.

Boxed-set binges have been a favourite theme of lazy journalists for the last decade. Breaking Bad may not have started the trend but was name-checked more than most, with a hint that the crystal meth. effect applied to the series as a product. I have never seen a frame of it, only the unappealing cover-art on the discs: man in underpants with a gun etc. etc. Well here are the first 33 of the 62 episodes as a nearly-free taster. :cskull:
 
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GNC

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Saw Backbeat in a packed cinema and enjoyed it. Ian Hart got the Lennon gig for starring in (and being so good in) The Hours and the Times, I believe. He's an excellent actor, deserved a better career (though he's hardly a failure), he was in a film called This Year's Love that was billed as a comedy but is actually a depressing drama, which he is fantastic in. More roles like that and he could have been as respected (for acting) and high profile as Gary Oldman.

Cloud Atlas certainly will give you food for thought. Most of those thoughts will be "What the Hell?" The fact they think Volkswagen Beetles sink is the least of them.

Breaking Bad, sometimes the hype is misplaced for US TV series which create a buzz (True Detective and Westworld, for example), but sometimes it's entirely justified. Breaking Bad was so meticulously constructed and well-acted it was surprising it caught on the in the way it did, it really is that good.
 

JamesWhitehead

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Bought 11 x DVDs, Bury 10.09.2018, total price, £8
2477b.D: Angel Heart, 1987, dir. Alan Parker, 108'15" ana. 1.85:1, + dir. Comm, + Extras + 56-page booklet
2492.D: My Wrongs #8245-8249 & 117, dir. Chris Morris, 12'20" + 12'28" + 3'23" Extras
2493.D: Spring & Port Wine, 1970, dir. Peter Hammond, 93'28" DVD-R, f/s open-matte?
2494-96.D: Sgt. Bilko, 18 Episodes, 1955-59, b & w, f/s, 18 x 25' + 5 Comms, Extras, 447' total
2497-2501.D: Jack Rosenthal at ITV, 17 acclaimed Comedies & Dramas, 1961 - 89, 915' total
Bought 2 x BluRay Discs, Heywood 10.09.2018, total price, £1.99
039-40.BR: Disney's Fantasia, 1940, 120' c + 2 Comms, Extras, Galleries etc.
& Fantasia 2000, 1999, 1.78:1, st. 75' c + Comm. + Extras including Destino, short, 1945 - 2003, 7'

I often get bored looking through DVD slush-piles: the vast majority of flms on offer are popular blockbusters of the last twenty years. I get so I can scan shelves at a distance, recognize the lettering on the spines and move on very quickly. Today, in Bury & Heywood, I found myself zooming-in for a closer look in five different outlets.

Angel Heart looked very different from the Optimum issue I bought very recently. This Momentum edition has a weighty 56-page booklet and I assumed it was the same disc. Not so! This earlier issue has only the feature in anamorphic widescreen. Yet it is a terrible transfer, full of shifting, swimmy images! The Extras are brief and in f/s mode. The Optimum issue is clearly the disc to have with a far superior transfer and longer Extras but the Momentum booklet, written by Parker himself, is excellent, so well worth the quid spent for that alone!

In the same shop, I almost missed a Chris Morris rarity: the oddly-named My Wrongs #8245-8249 & 117 comes in a minimalist sleeve that looks like something the Open University might have published, if it was mad. I know only that a short segment of the film was included as an Extra on the Jam discs and recall that the credits include a child-hurler! Looking it up, I find the film is a short, just 12'20" The disc has a Commentary-track- by the Intern! and some other mock-Extras, including a Remix, featuring once-famous dog-guru Barbara Woodhouse. She died back in 1988, so she was already ancient history when the film was made!

Oxfam brought Spring & Port Wine, a late starring-rôle for James Mason in the 1970 film, taken from a Bill Naughton stage success. This issue in "Classic Cinema Collection" has one of those tell-tale fuzzy colour-photo-copied sleeves and is, of course, a CD-R, likely to be bootlegged. I risked my £1.50. Since the till was printing blank receipts, I wondered if they were running them off in the back-room, along with all the ironing. The disc does play, seems to be an open-matte transfer from broadcast-quality tape. Zooms up to 1.78:1. Filmed in 1969 in Bolton. What a world away! I could recognize the church and not much else.

I don't know if a Collected Bilko has ever shown up in the UK. This 50th Anniversary Edition features 18 Episodes from 1955 to 1959 with various Extras. I already had three episodes on an old commercial VHS tape but only the very first episode was duplicated. The tape included the conclusion of the story in the second episode, the only time Bilko was not self-contained. Like the contemporary Hitchcock shows, these were made on 35mm film and looked very good in some of their later BBC outings in the early 1990s. A nice find for £2.50, though I see stacks of the Bilko shows are on Youtube for free!

The Jack Rosenthal set is drawn mainly from episodes of comedies and dramas he wrote for ITV, including Coronation Street, The Dustbinmen and Bootsie and Snudge. That one was before my time! The full-length drama is The Knowledge, about the test London cabbies were supposed to undergo. I recall it was acclaimed at the time but never saw it. The set, from Network, will not have been pressed in huge numbers and seemed worth the £2 asked.

In Heywood, it was BluRay day! A Disney double of Fantasia and its 1999 sequel. I suspect Stokowski's original 1937 soundtrack was replaced on this remastered version. If it's included, I can fling the VHS tape. One curio on the 2000 disc is the short Destino, which was realized in 2003, having been started in 1945 as a collaboration between Uncle Walt and Uncle Salvador Dalì. Only a few seconds of footage survives of the original project; the rest has been conjured-up by CGI.

A nice day's crop but it's time to scale down the acquisitions I think! :nods:
 
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GNC

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I prefer The Family Way to Spring and Port Wine, but it is a really good "oop North" drama, with a wonderful James Mason performance (though some disagreed, not sure why).

The Knowledge has a fantastic performance by Nigel Hawthorne, worth it for him alone.

I saw Fantasia on its 90s reissue in the pictures, and there was an oik of a kid who obviously didn't want to be there and had been dragged in by his mother sitting in front of me. I hesitate to say "pearls before swine", but I was glad the soundtrack was loud enough to drown out his protests.
 

JamesWhitehead

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Just the one today but quite a good one.
Bought 1 DVD, Middleton 12.09.2018, total price, £1
2502.D: Nicholas Nickleby, 1947, dir Cavalcanti, 103' + BFI Dickens Season Interviews + Silent Film version, 1912, Trailer + Gallery, supersedes 1371.V

This 2012 issue was part of a batch of Ealings which were remastered. They needed to be, as many of the old DVDs were shockers, barely better than off-air tapes. I have never seen Cavalcanti's Nickleby; it is generally thought to be several steps down from Lean's Oliver Twist. At least I may see it to better advantage in this form than on my old WB-badged VHS tape, acquired in 2016. :cooll:
 

JamesWhitehead

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Prestwich & Radcliffe again today but the charitee-shoppe finds were all Prestwich.
5 x DVDs, total price £4:
2503-04.D: Auschwitz, BBC Drama-Documentary, 2005, dir. Sutherland & Balazova, 285'52" ana. 1.78:1, + Interview, 16'06" P.
2505.D: Lullaby of Broadway, 1950, dir. David Butler, 88'28" f/s, P.
2506.D: The Singing, Ringing Tree, 1957, dir. Francesco Stefani, 71'22" + 71'27" f/s, Music Track + Interview, 15'53" + Gallery etc. P.
2507.D: Dead Man, 1995, dir. Jim Jarmusch, 116'35" ana. 1.78:1, st. + Trailer, 1'59" Outtakes & Deleted Scenes, 14'59" supersedes 917.V

A drama-documentary on Auschwitz turned up in the Jewish Federation Shop. Made sixty years after the liberation of the camps, with a running time of 4 hours and 45 minutes, it seemed to cry out for total immersion. Looking at it more closely, it is drama-documentary and uses a lot of CGI, questionable choices for the subject.

The total fluff of a Doris Day musical was an odd companion-piece to take to the till! It is a bare-bones disc, though, without so much as a trailer for make-weight.

Over in the Cancer Research Shop, there was a Network issue of The Singing, Ringing Tree. I remember the name more than the show, though it is always name-checked in articles on hauntology and weird old kids' tv. At the time it was segmented under the rubric Tales From Europe; I had assumed it was Czech, like much of that strand, but it was an East-German film. The remastered DVD contains both subtitled and English-language versions. The case gives the ratio as 4:3 (16:9) which turns out to mean academy ratio. It was obviously intended for cinemas. Blowing it up to 1.78:1 is the way to go, I think, though it is slightly tight on the tops of heads. The subtitles are readable, though clipped a little on the very bottom.

Jim Jarmusch's Western oddity features Mr. Depp as an unfortunate traveller named William Blake. This shrink-wrapped copy of the DVD has some 15 minutes of extra footage, in the form of outtakes and deleted scenes. The b & w photography looks very nice, so another VHS can go to the skip! :)

There was also a hardback book, Empires of the Imagination, a study of Fantasy Cinema by Alec Worley, 2005, which promises to take us from Georges Méliès to The Lord of the Rings. It looks to be a scholarly-enough tome, though packaged with a Harryhausen cover for the passing trade. Worth a punt at £1.25. I wonder if it belonged to the owner of The Singing Ringing Tree DVD? That film gets a mention in the book as a product of DEFA, the East German state studios, where its "alarmingly giddy" tone - Worley's phrase - defied political interpretation.
 
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GNC

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The Singing Ringing Tree is incredible, one of the great fantasy movies out of Europe and so weird, too. It must have had a mention on this board at some point.

Dead Man is one of Jarmusch's best, lots of his particular sense of humour. Dead Pan, you might say. B&W photography is wonderful.
 

cycleboy2

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Prestwich & Radcliffe again today but the charitee-shoppe finds were all Prestwich.
5 x DVDs, total price £4:
2503-04.D: Auschwitz, BBC Documentary, 2005, dir. Sutherland & Balazova, 285' w/s, + Interview, P.
2505.D: Lullaby of Broadway, 1950, dir. David Butler, 89' f/s, P.
2506.D: The Singing, Ringing Tree, 1957, dir. Francesco Stefani, 2 x 71' non-ana. w/s? + Music Track + Interview, Gallery etc. P.
2507.D: Dead Man, 1995, dir. Jim Jarmusch, 116' ana. 1.78:1, st. + Trailer, Outtakes & Deleted Scenes, P. supersedes 917.V

A massive and sombre documentary on Auschwitz turned up in the Jewish Federation Shop. Made sixty years after the liberation of the camps, with a running time of 4 hours and 45 minutes, it cries out for total immersion.

The total fluff of a Doris Day musical was an odd companion-piece to take to the till!

Over in the Cancer Research Shop, there was a Network issue of The Singing, Ringing Tree. I remember the name more than the show, though it is always name-checked in articles on hauntology and weird old kids' tv. At the time it was segmented under the rubric Tales From Europe; I had assumed it was Czech, like much of that strand, but it was an East-German film. The remastered DVD contains both subtitled and English-language versions.

Jim Jarmusch's Western oddity features Mr. Depp as an unfortunate traveller named William Blake. This shrink-wrapped copy of the DVD has some extra footage, presumably to mystify us further. It does mean another VHS can go to the skip. :)

There was also a hardback book, Empires of the Imagination, a study of Fantasy Cinema by Alec Worley, 2005, which promises to take us from Georges Méliès to The Lord of the Rings. It looks to be a scholarly-enough tome, though packaged with a Harryhausen cover for the passing trade. Worth a punt at £1.25. I wonder if it belonged to the owner of The Singing Ringing Tree DVD? That film gets a mention in the book as a product of DEFA, the East German state studios, where its "alarmingly giddy" tone - Worley's phrase - defied political interpretation.
The Singing Ringing Tree (Das klingende ringende Baumchen) is wonderful. I bought it on DVD years ago, and also wrote a piece on it for the science fiction magazine I used to write for. Each month one team member would write on something they love – I wrote pieces on The Singing Ringing Tree, The Shout and A Matter of Life and Death over the years. Now that's an evening's viewing!!!
 

Skrymr

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Today's trip into town yielded: 2 Next tee shirts, 1 Burton zip up cardigan and the surprising find of Under Armour thermal underlayer top and bottoms, all for less than a tenner :D
 

JamesWhitehead

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Bought 4 x DVDs, Harpurhey 30.09.2018, total price, £0.99
2508.D: Verdi: Aïda, Chiara, Pavarotti, Dimitrova, Ghiaurov, Pons, Burchuladze, La Scala, Maazel, r. 1986, Live, f/s, subtitled, 153'26"
2509.D: Schoenberg: Von Heute auf Morgen, Op.32, Nigl, Geller, Visentin, Schulz, d'Adamo, La Fenice, Inbal, r. 18-20.12.2008, live, ana. 1.78:1, subtitled, 59'49"
2510.D: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? dir. Mike Nicholls, 1966, b & w, ana. 1.78:1, 125'36" + 2 x Comms. Director with Soderbergh and by DOP Haskell Wexler - upgrade from VHS.
2511.D: Sunday Bloody Sunday, dir. John Schlesinger, 1971, colour, non-ana. 1.78:1, 105'33" + 2'28" trailer

+ 1 x h/b book, Best of British - A Celebration of Rank Film Classics, Maurice Sellar, illustrated, 154 pp, 1987, cover price £8.95, today £0.99 [Issued as a tie-in to "A Major BBC 1 Series."]

Two weeks' rest from buying in a time of watching the spending - not that bottom-feeding is ever really a wild expense. I seldom find myself tormented by the need to leave things on the shelf. In the case of some of my preferred material, I can predict the discs may languish untouched for months, blushing unseen amid acres of action movies and rom-coms.

The Harpurhey Opera House is a place no one has yet had the vision to build but someone there must like the art. I got an Aïda from La Scala and suspected I had it already on VHS. Not so! That was a Can Belto Verona Arena version from five years earlier. Maria Chiara starred in both.

Then a real oddity: a one-act comic opera by Arnold Schoenberg, written to demonstrate that his nerve-wracking serial-technique could be applied to a domestic soap-opera libretto. It persuaded no one but it is over in about three-quarters of an hour. Rarely revived, this DVD preserves an account from La Fenice, caught live ten years ago. The asking-price for niche material like this can hover around £30 in HMV, if it they stock it all now. I see Amazon will do it for $14.99 up to $42.98 Serendipity is a lot more fun!

Back to the movies. Talking of nerve-wracking domestic drama, here comes that Virgina Woolf again; too late to cross the road and pretend we haven't seen her! It's Liz and Dick in full specs and cardigan mode and a hint of swinging on the verandah at least. Once notorious for the language, it carries a 12-certificate now and I can't think of a sprog who would not run screaming from the room on account of the black-and-white! I see Mr. Wexler gets a commentary track of his own on this disc and it may look a lot more cinematic in widescreen. Out with another square old vid!

New to the collection is Schlesinger's moody chamber-trio; I know it from old tv showings only and the DVD cover is monochrome, as if to hint at greater age*. It was filmed in colour in 1971, marking one of the high-points of Glenda Jackson's career. Acting came to annoy her - I think it always did! Peter Finch was lost all too soon. As for the show, I always felt it was two bored people fighting over a gnome. I thought I might be approaching a full-house of Schlesingers but he went on longer than I imagined; I've got nothing after Marathon Man and only know Yanks of the later ones! :omg:

*Disappointing to find that the 2009 disc is non-anamorphic; it's badged as Optimum but sourced from MGM, who put out a lot of classic movies that way. The case just says Aspect Ratio 1.66:1, which it isn't anyway! It is formatted for a 1.78:1 screen - a small one in the middle of the academy frame! It will zoom, of course . . . Then why do they claim Virginia Woolf is in 1.85:1, when she is also 1.78:1, albeit anamorphic at least!:ranting:
 
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Kryptonite

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Years ago in a charity shop, I noticed a box of comics with a sign saying "50p each, 3 for £1" on it.

Had a look though, mostly 80s and 90s stuff , nothing very interesting (loads of New Universe issues, a few All-Star Squadrons, any comic collectors here will get an idea of how average this box of comics was). Right at the back, I found a copy of Fantastic Four 50 - the Startling Secret of the Silver Surfer by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

Took it to the till , I decided I'd give them more than 50p for it, the woman on the till actually offered to let me have it half-price because it wasn't in great condition!

Gave them a few pound for it, the woman just looked at me as if I were insane.
 

GNC

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New to the collection is Schlesinger's moody threesome chamber-piece. I know it from old tv showings only and the DVD cover is monochrome, as if to hint at greater age. It was filmed in colour in 1971, marking one of the high-points of Glenda Jackson's career. Acting came to annoy her - I think it always did! Peter Finch was lost all too soon. As for the show, I always felt it was two bored people fighting over a gnome. I thought I might be approaching a full-house of Schlesingers but he went on longer than I imagined; I've got nothing after Marathon Man and only know Yanks of the later ones! :omg:
SBS was quite controversial for its matter of fact treatment of the gay romance, but matter of fact from decades past doesn't look very exciting in the harsh light of the 21st Century. It's nicely acted, Murray Head is a bit of a plank and that does make Peter and Glenda look as if they'd be better off forgetting him and eloping with each other, they'd be happy together but for a quirk of nature.

One of Schlesinger's last was the grossly exploitative rape-murder-revenge but classy (?) and serious (?!) thriller Eye for an Eye, with Sally Field fretting over going all Charles Bronson. Quite a comedown from Darling and Midnight Cowboy, but it was the only offer he had at the time. Shame.
 

Swifty

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SBS was quite controversial for its matter of fact treatment of the gay romance, but matter of fact from decades past doesn't look very exciting in the harsh light of the 21st Century. It's nicely acted, Murray Head is a bit of a plank and that does make Peter and Glenda look as if they'd be better off forgetting him and eloping with each other, they'd be happy together but for a quirk of nature.

One of Schlesinger's last was the grossly exploitative rape-murder-revenge but classy (?) and serious (?!) thriller Eye for an Eye, with Sally Field fretting over going all Charles Bronson. Quite a comedown from Darling and Midnight Cowboy, but it was the only offer he had at the time. Shame.
Would that be the same Murray Head who released the 80's pop tune 'One Night in Bangkok' ?

..
 

JamesWhitehead

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Bought 1 x DVD, Harpurhey 19.10.2018, total price, £0.99
2512.D: China Syndrome, dir. James Bridges, 1978, 117' 1.85:1, + trailer, supersedes f/s VHS on 929.V
Bought 5 x CDs, Prestwich 22.10.2018, total price £1
540-41.CD: Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor, Callas, di Stefano, Panerai, La Scala, RIAS, Karajan, r. 29.09.1955, live, Berlin, 125' c
542-44.CD: Wagner: Tristan und Isolde, Flagstad, Melchior, Huehn, Thorberg, List, Cehanovsky, Marlowe, Beattie, NY Metropolitan Opera, Leinsdorf, r. 23.03.1940, 74'45" + 65'05" + 65'22" = 205'12"

Made just before the Three Mile Island incident, The China Syndrome seemed a prescient movie in 1979, the title referring to the fanciful notion that a nuclear meltdown might continue through the earth to China. One way of feeling together, I suppose. More to the point, it allowed Jane Fonda, Jack Lemmon and Michael Douglas to overheat to great effect. I can send my VHS version to China now - well the Failsworth dump anyway.

Between commercial recordings of her most celebrated rôle for Columbia, both under Serafin, in 1953 and 1959, Callas was caught live in Berlin, under H. von K. with her accustomed Scala cast of the day. Thanks to slack Italian copyright laws, it is easy to find live Callas records at knock-down prices. This "Virtuoso" CD set dates from 1989 - I expect 2nd or 3rd-generation RAI quality. We shall see.

I see that I already had a 1943 version of Tristan from the Met. under Leinsdorf with much of the same cast! But Traubel was Isolde and Kipnis, King Marke. The booklet to this 1940 Flagstad version explains that Tristan was a great favourite, being broadcast nine times from the Met. between 1935 and 1941. These Saturday-night broadcasts were massively popular. Some versions of the acetates retain the promotional intros. reminding us that live broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera were regarded as a commercially-viable venture in the years of the Depression. :pipe:
 

Grumpyoldwoman

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Three things I will treasure always - a picture of Wookey Hole,one of Woodspring Priory out Sand Bay way near Weston-s-Mare and one of Uphill Church (also Weston,my home town) All bought from my local British Heart Foundation for £10 or less.
Also an proper,old wooden desk which is perfect as a pc desk from the same place - less than £30
 

JamesWhitehead

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Bought 1 x DVD, Droylsden 23.10.2018, total price, £0.50
2513.D: So Long at the Fair, 1950, dir. Darnborough & Fisher, f/s, 82' supersedes downloaded version, 9163.D

This is the story of the Paris Exhibition disappearance, where a hotel denies all knowledge of a guest. In Hitchcock's half-hour version, it is a daughter, whose mother disappears, in keeping, I think with the original tale. This 1950 feature stretches it somewhat to accommodate Dirk Bogarde. No Polish boys were harmed in this exercise. :dsist:
 

JamesWhitehead

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Bought 5 x Arthur Askey DVDs, Harpurhey, 25.10.2018, total price, £2:
2514.D: Band Waggon, 1940, dir. Marcel Varnel, 75'57" [originally released at 85']
2515.D: Bees in Paradise, 1944, dir. Val Guest, 71'52"
2516.D: King Arthur was a Gentleman, 1942, dir. Marcel Varnel, 94'34"
2517.D: Miss London Limited, 1943, dir. Val Guest, 94'59"
2518.D: I Thank You, 1941, dir. Marcel Varnel, 77'50"
[NB: Missing from the set is Back Room Boy, 1942, dir. Herbert Mason, downloaded as MP4 from Youtube, 203.1 Mb, 78'54" - use VLC for proper 4:3 ratio]
Bought 5 x DVDs & 2 BluRays, Cheetham Hill 25.10.2018, total price, £3:
2519-20.D: Amadeus, Director's Cut, 1984, 2001. dir. Milos Forman, ana. 172'59" ana. scope. st. + Comm. + w/s Making of Doc. 60'43"
2521.D: Excalibur, 1981, dir John Boorman, ana. 1.78:1, 134'58"
2522.D: Witness, 1985, Peter Weir, ana. 1.78:1, 107'49", + Doc. etc. supersedes f/s video, 1382.V
duplicate: Being John Malkovich, 1999, dir. Spike Jonze, 1.85:1, st. + Extras, accidental duplicate of 2231.D
041.BR: Tetsuo: The Iron Man, 1989, dir. Shinya Tsukamoto, f/s, b & w, 67'18" + Adventures of Denchu Kozo, 1987, 44'58", Interview, 18'53" + 5'46" etc.
[NB: All Extras are on disc 2, which is DVD. Features are on Blue Ray disc 1]
042.BR: Tetsuo II: Body Hammer, 1992, dir. Shinya Tsukamoto, f/s, colour, 80'53" [last seen 17.02.1997, part of BBC2 Forbidden Season.]
+ P/B Book @ £1: Peter Laslett: The World We Have Lost, 1965, revised edition, 1971

A very miscellaneous crop of DVDs/Blue Discs. An incomplete set of Arthur Askey comedies, dating from the war years. I already have his Ghost Train somewhere, along with a fragmentary version from the 1930s. Askey tends to be annoying* but he is supported by Moore Marriott and Graham Moffatt, in vehicles conceived for Will Hay. I see that the King Arthur title plays with the theme of Excalibur and look what turned up next!

I can't say I ever fancied Amadeus, even when he was fresh. It seemed to be a film about classical music for people who didn't like it and wanted composers poisoned on sight. Having seen this Mozart, I would be all in favour of that! Anyway, an extended cut was issued on DVD, with Commentary and Extras; Milos Forman was esteemed for his Czech films, so why not grab it, despite finding his Cuckoo's Nest a chore to sit through? It seems to have been a lavish spectacle, for sure.

Peter Weir's Amish drama was last viewed on a fuzzy VHS tape last year. Now that can be retired. The Malkovich thing turned out to be an accidental duplicate. The Japanese body-horror set turned up shrink-wrapped in Bluray format - not quite my thing but marginally "wanted" - just for featuring on a list of things seen in 1997!

Finally a volume of social history, drawn from detailed research into parish registers etc. It contains some interesting tables detailing the wealth of all classes of society. :party:

*My grandma knew him and said he was a mean little man!
 
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GNC

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The first Tetsuo is a tiny-budget marvel, packed with energy and wild imagery. The sequel was... a bit of a letdown. Some filmmakers work better on smaller means. I did laugh at Tsukamoto grinning at the camera for about five minutes after a big set piece, though.
 

JamesWhitehead

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Bought 2 x DVD set, Radcliffe 31.10.2018, total price £0.79:
2523-24.D: One Summer, 1983, Yorkshire TV series, dir. Gordon Flemyng, written by Willy Russell, 5 x 50' episodes, f/s + Extras, P.
Bought 5 x DVDs, Radcliffe 31.10.2018, total price £1:
2525.D: North Wales Coast, Crewe to Holyhead by Rail, driver's view, 2016, 109' written by Peter Middleton, P.
2526.D: Buena Vista Social Club, 1999, dir. Wim Wenders, w/s, st. 100' + Commentary, Deleted Scene, Trailer, Booklet etc. P.
2527.D: Father Ted, Series 3, 8 episodes, 193' total, f/s, st. + Extras, supersedes 614.V
+ The Dark Knight, 2-disc set - this was already on Bluray disc.
Bought 1 x DVD, Bolton 31.10.2018, total price £1:
2528.D: The Rainbow, 1989, dir. Ken Russell, 106' f/s? + Trailer, P.
Bought 2 x DVDs, Bolton 31.10.2018, total price £2.98:
2529.D: Chimes at Midnight, 1965, dir. Orson Welles, 115' 1.85:1, b & w, P.
2530.D: Rita, Sue & Bob Too, 1987, dir. Alan Clarke, w/s, 88' + Doc. on Clarke, 24'
Bought 2 x DVDs, Bolton 31.10.2018, total price £1:
2531-32.D: The Last Emperor, 1987, dir. Bernardo Bertolucci, scope, st. 156' + 209' + Commentary + Documentary, P.
[+ 59 CDs, bought, Bolton 31.10.2018, total price £10:
545-51.CD: Beethoven: Complete String Quartets & Große Fuge, Alban Berg String Quartet, r. 1978-83, Switzerland, P
552-62.CD: Mahler: Complete Symphonies, Concertgebouw, NYPO, VPO, Bernstein, r. 1980s, DGG Collector Edition, P
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2010/Apr10/Mahler_Symphonies_Bernstein_4778668.htm
563-73.CD: Malcolm Arnold: Complete Conifer Recordings, RPO, Handley etc, Sony Masters Edition, P.
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/Nov06/Arnold_symphonies_4765337.htm
574-603.CD: Elgar: Collector's Edition, EMI Classics, 30 x CDs of his works in HMV recordings, [P.]
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Oct07/Elgar_Collectors_5036032.htm

Tax-rebate giddy, I blew nearly £17 on charidee-loot today on a double-destination jaunt to Radcliffe and Bolton. Whoopee!

I only dimly recall Willy Russell's 1983 television series about two scouse scallies let loose in Wales. It did make an impression on the scouse scallies I was teaching at the time. One insisted that he had seen me in it - so I will be curious to know what hideous character I represented to him!

More nostalgia drew me to the rail-journey disc: the North Wales coastal journey - from Chester onwards - was an essential part of my student days. The disc is actually quite recent - 2016 - but may be good for a wallow. What sticks in my mind most from those days was the eerie industrial landscape of the oil-refinery at Ellesmere Port, followed by the miles of bleak caravan-parks at Prestatyn! I think I liked the coast best on its grey and wintery days!

Wim Wenders' documentary on veteran Cuban jazz musicians was issued, I think, as a newspaper freebie. One of the few I don't have! So this official issue, complete with Commentary etc. seemed a good find.

Last month, I took my videos of Father Ted to the tip in an untypical spasm of tidiness. It was inevitable, they would creep back in as DVDs. There are plenty of copies about, so it won't be long before the set is complete again.

The fourth for the pound was a double-disc Batman set but I had already acquired it on Bluray. Odd to get something twice I could hardly care less about. Such is the four-for-a-quid mindset!

Onwards to Bolton, where Ken Russell's 1989 Lawrence adaptation called out to be grabbed. Generally regarded as a tepid, lesbian-spiced sequel to Women in Love, it must mark one of the last film appearances of Glenda Jackson.

Over to the British Fart Foundation, where Orson Welles' once-elusive Falstaff show was up for grabs, albeit in a version - from Paladium-Cornerstone - which some called illegal and others just disgusting! It is now available in restored versions. Now they tell me! Well this one was £1, so there!

Andrea Dunbar's earthy take on teenage sexual adventures was still audience-pleasing stuff in the nineties, when I saw it on stage. Not so much, recently, when its cheerful amorality has offended some with its refusal to view its naughty teens as victims. Alan Clarke's film dates from 1987, a product of the Film4 initiative, which gave cinema releases to work that would previously have been Play For Today material. I see I caught up with the film in a tv showing on 28.02.1995, viewing it on the first of March and overtaping it three days later. It is the stuff we deemed ephemeral that we seem doomed to re-acquire!

I have Bertolucci's lavish Chinese epic on an excellent newspaper freebie but I was aware that an extended cut was available. It fell into my lap today. The three-and-a-half-hour cut is billed as Director's Cut, though the director is said to have thought of it as the television-version. As a Commentary and "In-Depth" making-of documentary are included, that question should be cleared up - if I ever get around to viewing them!

A good day for films but a great one for music. Four massive CD sets - amounting to 59 discs - came to just £10 at the till. I recently read an account of how pictures were exhibited; it contrasted the French Salon-style, in which every inch of wall-space was covered with works, jockeying for attention, with the Russian-style, which gave the pieces space to breathe and lit them appropriately as singular attractions. The bulk-buying encouraged by these massive CD-sets seems to call for some restraint in their consumption. Lists and catalogues are all very well but they can seem like the scratchings on Crusoe's wall. :omr:
 
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