Charity Shop & Poundshop Finds

escargot

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My youngest is out on the chazzas in Brum this week to celebrate a friend's birthday. They plan to each buy one another a garment that will suit them perfectly. Sounds like fun!
 

escargot

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I'm afraid you have incurred a fine for 'gratuitous & superfluous use of like'. It's in the small print.

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The Admin Team

like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like
like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like
 

hunck

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like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like
like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like
Come now, there's no need for childishness. Article 10 in section C, 'Offences Incurring a Fixed Penalty' clearly identifies "gratuitous use of 'like' where unnecessary, when used in a sentence, unless it's a direct quote. Excessive repetition as a display of approval of a previous post, though irritating, is allowable".

Kind regards
The Admin Team [TAT]
 

JamesWhitehead

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DVD, bought Radcliffe 31.01.2019, total price £0.75p.
2591.D: Roberta, 106' dir William A. Seiter, 1935, P.

The third of the ten pictures made by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, Roberta was the 1935 filming of a 1933 Jerome Kern show, with all the customary alterations for the screen. Roberta had not previously shown up in the slush-piles for me; all the others seem to turn up quite often in collected editions on VHS and DVD. This may have something to do with historic ownership complications: Roberta was purchased from RKO by MGM, who were planning a Technicolor remake. It was kept out of circulation for some years. This could explain how it turns up on the marginal Palladium label, which is essentially Public Domain, region 0. Their transfers are variable, though some seem to have been sourced from HD broadcasts. This 2008 disc has yet to be checked*. :cooll:

*edit, 02.02.2019. It's a bit grainy but a reasonable transfer. Not obviously worse than the average UK Universal editions of others in the series.
 
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JamesWhitehead

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It was up to Rochdale today for a browse, because the day was bright, though bitter and I had not been up there for weeks. The Mind charity-shop had shut down but there was a new Hospice emporium in the Wheatsheaf Precinct.

Back over the road, the old CoOp has been taken over by the Emmaus homeless charity. The three-floor premises must be the biggest charity-shop I have been in, so far. The goods have plenty of space between them and they cannot afford to heat the place. The books and entertainment section was on the top floor, where paperbacks were £1 and hardbacks £2. I made a single but somewhat Fortean purchase:

Curiosities of Civilization by Andrew Wynter, 8th Edition, n.d. probably 1880s, reprinted from articles in the Quarterly and Edinburgh Reviews.
Hardback, pub. Robert Hardwicke, 192, Piccadilly, 535 pp. The chapters and their original dates of publication are as follows:
Advertisements, 1855
Food & Its Adulterations, 1855
The Zoological Gardens, 1855
Rats, 1857
Lunatic Asylums, 1857
The London Commissariat, 1854
Woolwich Arsenal, 1858
Shipwrecks, 1858
Lodging, Food & Dress of Soldiers, 1859
The Electric Telegraph, 1854
Fires & Fire Insurance, 1855
The Police & the Thieves, 1856
Mortality in Trades & Professions, 1860

It can be had for free at Gutenberg and archive.org but the tidy, Victorian hardback was a nice find for £2. I see there was an earlier book-dealer's price pencilled inside, £6.99 :cooll:
 
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Swifty

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Don't like the way that poodle is eyeing up my snack sack.

View attachment 14674
Was the snack sack sewn into the crotch area of these trousers? .. I can't zoom in enough to read the small print.

edit: after a whopping 2 minutes research, sansabelt was a brand of elasticated trousers that didn't need a belt: sans a belt .. according to Wikipedia, a Sansabelt store can be seen in Ferris Bueller's Day Off

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sansabelt
 
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Comfortably Numb

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From the website itself... can't find fault with any of this..

"Classic FM presents The Wedding Collection: The ultimate wedding music for both ceremony and reception

This outstanding 2CD collection of wedding favourites will ensure you have the perfect music for every stage of your wedding.

Disc one has been specially curated to be played during the ceremony, whether it be in a church, registry office or even on the beach! Walk down the aisle to Wagner’s Bridal Chorus or Pachelbel’s Canon in D and enjoy a celebratory piece of music, perhaps Mendelssohn’s Wedding March as you exit the ceremony with your new husband/wife.

Disc two features a diverse range of music that has been classically arranged, to provide a classy yet celebratory feel. There’s something here for all of your family and friends to enjoy.

Have your first dance to a beautiful rendition of Ed Sheeran’s ‘Perfect’ or Whitney Houston’s ‘I Will Always Love You’, then simply let the music play on through the night, providing you and your guests with the most beautiful music for the most special day of your life".

Wonder how many copies they sold... :popc:
 

Frideswide

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Crash course tuition to get the terrified Groom through the First Dance was (and probably still is) a lucrative business in London.
That seems like a long way around when there is such a simple solution!

We got married in England and couldn't find an appropriate ceilidh band. Otherwise we might well have had a first dance in terms of leading the first set!
 

JamesWhitehead

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2 x DVDs, bought Cheetham Hill 06.02.2019, total price £2.00 p.
2592.D: Les vacances de M. Hulot, 83'11" dir. Jacques Tati, 1953, + Richard Lester interview, 35'39" trailers for 3 Tati films, 2'59" + 1'31" + 1'01" supersedes 528.V
2593.D: City of Lost Children, 107'51" dir. Jeunet & Caro, + Gallery 43 images, Filmography texts, non-ana. 1.78:1, st. English dubbing only, cf off-air w/s tape, 158.V
DVD, bought Bury 06.02.2019, total price £1.99 p.
2594.D: Il Conformisto, 110'47" dir. Bernardo Bertolucci, 1970, Korean disc, ana. 1.66:1, US dubbed version, supersedes off-air tapes on 019.V & 176.V

DVD, bought Swinton 06.02.2019, total price £0.99 p.
Duplicate of 1309.D: Rossini: Il Barbiere, Bartoli etc, 1988
3-disc Bluray/DVD set, bought Swinton:
041.BR: Snow White, 79'51" dir. David Hand, 1937, + John Canemaker Commentary, supersedes 335.V, NB: This disc is DVD
042.BR: Snow White, 83'11" dir. David Hand, 1937, Bluray version + Comm. + Extras?
043.BR: Snow White Extras, ?? dir. various. documentaries etc, 11'48" + 17'08" + 5'49" etc. Bluray disc.
[+ 3 h/b music books, bought Salford Precinct Heart Foundation Shop, 06.02.2019, @ £2.50 each, total £7.50 p:
Thomas Mace: Musick's Monument, facsimile edition of the 1676 textbook, published Paris, 1958, 272 pp
Handel: A Symposium, edited by Gerald Abraham, OUP, 1963 reprint of 1954 volume, 328 pp
Dean: Handel's Dramatic Oratorios and Masques, OUP, 1966 reprint of 1959 volume, 694 pp]

5 x DVDs, bought Harpurhey 07.02.2019, total price £2.97 p.
2595.D: Terror at the Opera, 102'33" dir. Dario Argento, 1987, ana. scope, subtitled version, P.
2596.D: Theatre of Blood, 99'48" dir. Douglas Hickox, 1973, non-ana. 1.78:1, + Trailer, 2'26" P?
2597-99.D: This is Spinal Tap, 79'42" dir. Rob Reiner, 1984, ana. 1.85:1, st. + Comm. + Docs. 43'03" Interviews, Outtakes, 67'52" etc, P.

2 x DVDs, bought Ashton-u-Lyne 08.02.2019, total price £1.00 p.
2600-01.D: The David Niven Show, 12 x 24', dir. various, 1959 tv series, b & w, f/s, P.
2 x Blurays, bought Ashton-u-Lyne:
044-45.BR: Breaking Bad, Series 5b, 8 episodes, dir. various, 2013, + Comms. + Extras, P.
[cf DVDs, Series 1 to 3, 2481-91.D, Series 4, 2568-71.D] [NB: Series 5a, also consists of 8 episodes, yet to acquire.]

5 x DVDs, bought Chadderton 15.02.2019, total price £2.50 p.
2602.D: Mississippi Burning, 121'33" dir. Alan Parker, 1988, ana. 1.85:1, + Dir. Comm. Trailer, supersedes faulty 1064.V
2603.D: Airport, 131'01" dir. George Seaton, 1970, ana. 2.1:1, stereo, from Todd AO orig. + Trailer, 3'22" = 2292.D
2604.D: Airport '75, 102'00" dir. Jack Smight, 1974, ana. scope,
2605.D: Airport '77, 108'41" dir. Jerry Jameson, 1977, ana. scope,
2606.D: Airport '79: Concorde, 108'37 dir. David Lowell Rich, 1979, ana. 1.78:1

2 x DVDs, bought Stockport 16.02.2019, total price £3.00 p.
2607.D: Gigi (1948) 82' dir. Jacqueline Audry, 1948, f/s, French language, no subtitles? P.
2608.D: Stagecoach (1939) 88' dir. John Ford, German DVD, German & English soundtracks, presumably uncut
2608.D: Stagecoach (1986) 93' dir. Ted Post, German DVD, f/s, made for tv, no English soundtrack? P.
[+ LP: 5886.S: Nielsen: Commotio & 20 Preludes Jørgen Ernst Hansen, Frobenius Organ, St. Andreas Church, Copenhagen, Vox TV 34193 S, r. 1967]

After a quiet start, finds have picked up in February: seventeen DVDs, five Blurays, three heavyweight music tomes and one LP.

The car was in for its MOT on the sixth, so I wandered around Cheetham Hill then hopped on the Metrolink for a morning browse around Bury. It was a day for continental cinema, all supposed upgrades from old VHS versions. M. Hulot is an old friend but, in part, not so old as we might think. All the prints I have seen incorporate a brief Jaws gag, added by Tati, after the success of that blockbuster. I am now curious to see the original cut. There are various soundtracks which hark back to the music-plus-effects era. I think this DVD uses French crowd sounds etc. English versions may be confined to America and are usually deplored in reviews. Coincidentally, both my other finds that day turned out to be English dubbings. City of Lost Children is an early non-anamorphic version with no alternative to the dubbed audio. The bootlegged? Korean version of The Conformist is anamorphic 1.66:1 but has only an American dubbed soundtrack. The case boasts this is the complete version but the film was uncut in Europe. I fear the off-air tape of the subtitled version cannot be consigned to the tip yet!

The car, miraculously, passed the MOT with just two new bulbs to add to the bill. I had it back by early afternoon, so was able to fit in a browse around Swinton and then Salford. I found I already had Bartoli's Barbiere but the bargain came from the kiddies' shelf: Disney's Snow White in the three-disc Diamond Bluray set. It is missing its slip-case and looked a bit "used" but it cleaned up a treat and plays perfectly. Only two of the discs are Blurays. The concept of the hybrid set, including the DVD, was supposedly to encourage customers onto the newer platform but with entry-level players so cheap, it is surprising so many were released. There are extensive Extras on the third disc, which is also Bluray but they are awkwardly spread across sections and subsections, which are a nuisance to navigate. I would have expected a long-form documentary for this famous animation landmark. Still, the set was a pound well-spent.

Salford's dismal Shopping City precinct was an unusual place to find a tranche of top quality music books. They were from the library of a Prestwich music-teacher, which seems to have been dispersed to numerous charities. I have been finding them around the region for three or four years. Unpriced in a box, I half-expected they might be a pound each. No such luck but the asking-price was very reasonable, as all were in mint condition.

Two campy horrors turned up in Harpurhey the next day. The Argento is a Phantom of the Opera variant, set during a performance of Verdi's Macbeth, though the soundtrack is also punctuated by the horrid rock music which typifies the genre. Two soundtracks are on offer: the English language version seems to synchronise better than the Italian. It was customary for all the sound to be looped on these Italian shows. Some say that every actor spoke their own language in some productions - which takes us back to the opera, where polyglot performances were tolerated before WWII!

Theatre of Blood is a 1973 Vincent Price vehicle in which a mad actor revenges himself on his critics. Price made so many similar films, it is hard to say which I have seen. I am pretty sure this one used to turn up on television quite frequently once-upon-a-time. True to (bad) form, the MGM-badged DVD is non-anamorphic 1.78:1, though it blows up reasonably.

Reiner's heavy metal satire is more or less indistinguishable from the real thing. It is mercifully brief but there are extensive extras on this 3-disc edition, including commentary, documentary, full-length versions of the songs, even an hour-long concert sequel. Clearly one for the fans but a hard bargain to pass up in a shop where sets are priced as single discs.

I had never really heard anything about The David Niven Show, before a set turned up in Ashton on the 8th. We are promised short stories with a twist in the tale, much in the manner of Alfred Hitchcock Presents. With a running time of just under 25 minutes, they date from 1959. Only one series of 13 shows was made. Annoyingly, the 2-disc set omits one of the shows. Also, that day, I thought I had completed my Breaking Bad set and was pleased to find the Final Season on Bluray for just £2.50. Checking up, I see there are still eight episodes to find and the going-rate for this common Bluray set in some stores is just £1! Such is popularity.

I hesitated over Mississippi Burning. My own VHS version must have been pre-owned by a member of the Klan, since the climactic house-burning scene had been mangled by over-use, the picture disappearing for a couple of minutes. The MGM DVD case stated it was letterboxed 4:3. Still, at least I would be able to see the film uninterrupted. In fact, on this occasion, I was lucky: the disc had evidently been upgraded to a decent anamorphic transfer and the Alan Parker commentary is probably worth hearing too.

I bought the original Airport on DVD for a giggle in September, 2017. Now the four-disc "Terminal" set has surfaced, confirming that almost any scene could come out of Airplane! Checking up, I see that the final Concorde entry also exists in a three-hour television cut. This, mercifully, has yet to be officially issued in any home media format.

Yesterday was Stockport's turn and there were plenty of places to visit, including one charity emporium, which featured dated stocks of food, along with a small section of more routine books, ornaments etc. They do boast that more than half their stock is within date. As with standard shops, a lot of the floorspace was devoted to snacks and fizzy drinks. Gravy-powder was also over-represented, as well as all the Pontefract Cakes you would ever need. I came to the conclusion that it was probably not intended as an alternative food-bank for the hungry and may be another sign of retail space being repurposed post-capitalism.

Over the road, two slightly unusual DVDs turned up. Gigi was not the Hollywood musical but the 1948 black and white French version, by the female director Jacqueline Audry. I see this has been appended to some sets of the musical. This stand-alone French disc probably lacks English subtitles but it includes a rather wonderful insert, illustrating the riches of the René Chateau Vidéo catalogue: lots of titles that have never found an overseas market. Finally, for now, there is a German disc, featuring two versions of Stagecoach: John Ford's classic 1939 film with John Wayne, together with a 1986 made-for-tv version. I was not drawn so much by the latter as by the chance to see Ford's movie as he made it*. All UK versions of this title suffer mandatory BBFC adjustments, due to cruel horse-falls. It would be interesting to know if broadcast versions observe or observed these modifications but I have never taped the film.

Find of the day, for me, had to be the Turnabout LP of Nielsen's organ music. It's one of the last 50 or so LPs which I borrowed from the library way back and which are still on my shopping-list. I see I last heard this one 30.10.1973. A mint copy for just £2 turned up as the very last item in a box of otherwise uninteresting stuff! It pays to keep browsing sometimes! :yay:

*edit 18.02.2019. Fat chance with this rotten and misleading disc. The 1939 picture is presented in fake widescreen, topping and tailing the image with no remedy. Print is horrid and the soundtrack is just the German dub, despite what it says on the case. Ironically, the 1986 version is in Academy ratio, which may be correct for a tv movie, though it could be zoomed and matted, if the print was better. The soundtrack, again, is just a German dub. Ho-hum! Sometimes a disc is not worth even a quid.
 
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JamesWhitehead

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2 x DVDs, bought Bolton 18.02.2019, total price £0.50 p.
2593b.D: City of Lost Children, 107'51" dir. Jeunet & Caro, + Comm. + Interview + Gallery 43 images, Filmography texts, ana. 1.78:1, st. French + subs or English dubbing, supersedes 158.V & 2593a.D
2609.D: Russian Ark, 96' dir. Alexander Sokurov. 2002, + Making of + Doc. + Trailer etc. P.

It did not take long for a better version of City of Lost Children to show up. Though I have seen it twice from video, it is the sort of film I want to enjoy more than I do; the weirdness seems to preclude any real tension or development. At least its visual creativity can now be enjoyed in reasonable style and with the authentic French soundtrack. This Studio Canal issue also includes a director Commentary.

The Russian Ark has intrigued me since I first heard about it. Shot on HD video, it transports us to the Hermitage in the 1700s in one, single, roving shot of 100 minutes, establishing a few cinematic records. Two nice discs for 50 pence. :)
 
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GNC

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Know what you mean about City of Lost Children, as a feat of artistry and imagination it's remarkable, but it leaves you cold somehow. To put it crudely, it's a bit up its own arse.

Recommended to read up on Russian history before you tackle Russian Ark or it looks like someone's tourist video (or maybe watch the doc first!).
 

Shady

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Went in Barnardos, got Terry Pratchett's, The Wit and Wisdom of DiscWorld and,Clarkson's, The Top Gear Years and my friend picked up a brand new pair of boots by Hotter
 
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