Charity Shop & Poundshop Finds

Shady

Mary Queen of Scots...temping as DEATHS Kitty
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It is cute but sounds like all the other lil toys that you get that roars, but i needed a raptor for the Park, they are my fav, also in the park are about three other dinos,a snake, gecko and a flamingo
 

JamesWhitehead

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13 x DVDs, bought Harpurhey 19.05.2019, total price £6.95:
2681.D: History of Mr Polly, dir. Anthony Pelissier, 1948, f/s, 91'54" + Galloping Foxley, 25'32" & John Mills interviews, 11'27" + 15'28" supersedes 605.V, Extras P.
2682.D: My Beautiful Laundrette, dir Stephen Frears, 1985, non-ana. w/s, 93'20" + f/s Trailer, 1'57" supersedes f/s VHS, 1102.V
2683.D: Requiem for a Dream, dir. Darren Aronofsky, 2000, ana. 1.78:1, st. 97'01" + Comm. Deleted Scenes, 19'55" Making of doc. 35'20" Selby interview, 19'55" etc, supersedes w/s VHS, 356.V
2684.D: Haunting at the Rectory, dir. Andrew Jones, 2015, 88'09" ana. scope, st. P.
2685-93.D: Mad Men, Seasons 1, 2 & 3, 2007 to 2010, 39 x 46' c + Commentaries, Extras, ana. w/s, P.
10 x DVDs, bought Prestwich 20.05.2019, total price £6.00:
2694.D: All That Heaven Allows, dir Douglas Sirk, 1955, ana. 1.78:1, 88'6" + non-ana w/s Trailer, 2'30" Korean issue, English language, removable subs, P.
2695-96.D: A Fish Called Wanda, dir. Charles Chrichton, 1988, ana. 1.85:1, 103'30" + Comm. + Trivia + Documentary, 48'08" + 30'31" + Featurettes, Deleted Scenes, 27'33" etc. P.
2697.D: Plaza Full of Dreams, dir. David Eve, 2012, f/s? 136' c: ana. w/s, 59'47" + f/s, 20'13" + ana. w/s, 14'50" + ana. w/s, 37'40" P.
2698.D: Amores Perros, dir. Alejandro Gonzales Innaritu, 2000, 147'31" ana. 1.78:1, + Deleted Scenes, non-ana. w/s, 16'42" Behind the Scenes, 7'37" Music Videos, 3'20" + 3'56" + 3'52" etc. P.
2699.D: My Brother is an Only Child, dir. Daniele Luchetti, 2007, ana. 1.85:1, st. 99'52"' ana. 1.78:1, st. + Interview, 14'31" + Trailer, 1'53" P.
2700.D: Pumping Iron, dir. George Butler, Robert Fiore, 1977, f/s, 81'47" + 2 Featurettes, non-ana. w/s, 12'15" + 9'07" Extras P.
2701.D: Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus, dir. Terry Gilliam, 2009, ana. 1.85:1, st. 118'00" + Comm. + Featurettes, c 45' total, P.
2702.D: Shakespeare in Italy, prod. Andrea Carnevali. 2012, ana. 1.78:1, st. 59'21" + 58'50" + Deleted Scenes, 45'05" & Making of, 15'00" P.
2703.D: League of Gentlemen, Series One, dir Steve Bendelack, 1999, ana. 1.78:1, st. 6 x 29' c, + Comms. + Extras, 25' some P. supersedes 190.V
10 x DVDs, bought Middleton 20.05.2019, total price £1.00:
2704.D: L'Appartement, dir. Gilles Mimouni, 1996, ana. 1.66:1, st. 111'43" P. supersedes 1294.V
2705.D: Nói Albinói, dir, Dagur Kári, 2002, ana. w/s, st. 88'25" + Comm. + Making of, 19'31" Deleted Scenes, 14'41" & Interview, 29'58" P.
2706.D: Night School, dir. Ken Hughes, 1981, ana. 1.78:1, 88'34" + f/s trailer, 2'26" P.
2707.D: Prince of Darkness, dir John Carpenter, 1987, ana. scope. st. 97'40" + Commentary + Trailer, ana. 1.78:1, st. 1'47" P.
2708.D: Monkey Shines, dir. George A. Romero, 1988, ana. 1.85:1, st. 108'22" P.
2709.D: Island of Dr. Moreau, dir. Don Taylor, 1977, ana. 1.85:1, 94'56" + f/s Trailer, 2'07" P.
2710.D: Pet Sematary, dir. Mary Lambert, 1989, ana. 1.78:1, st. 98'29" P.
2711.D: Shocker, dir. Wes Craven, 1989, ana. 1.85:1, st. 105'02" + Comm. + Story Board + Multi-Angle Feature + Trailer, ana. 1.78:1, st. 1'16" P.
2712.D: Wolf, dir. Mike Nichols, 1994, ana. 1.78:1, st. 120'16" P.
2713.D: Night of the Demon, dir. Jacques Tourneur, 1957, ana. 1.66:1, 91'51" + 24-page booklet, supersedes 135.V
2713.D: Curse of the Demon, dir. Jacques Tourneur, 1957, ana. 1.66:1, 78'21" edited US version of above + Gallery, P.
4 x DVDs, bought Radcliffe 22.05.2019, total price £1.00:
2714.D: Tequila Sunrise, dir Robert Towne, 1988, ana. 1.78:1, 110'32" + Trailer, 1'29" supersedes 995.V
2715.D: Novo, dir. Jean-Pierre Limosin, 2002, ana. 1.85:1, st. 93'13" + Trailer, 1'34" + 4 Featurettes, 27'39" + Trailers, P.
2716.D: Gerry, dir. Gus van Sant, 2002, ana. scope. st. 98'41" + Trailer, 2'37" + Salt Lake Van Sant, 13'50" P.
2717.D: Redacted, dir. Brian de Palma, 2007, ana. 1.85:1, st. 86'19" + Interview, 61'40" + Refugee Interviews + Trailer, 1'26" + Gallery. 2'41" P.
DVD, bought Shaw 25.05.2019, total price £1.00:
2718.D: Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, dir. David Lynch, 1992, 129'08" ana. 1.85:1, st. + EPK, f/s, st, 19'44", supersedes f/s video 747.V
2 x DVDs, bought Chadderton 25.05.2019, total price £2.49:
2719-20.D: Encounters at the End of the World, SE, dir. Werner Herzog, 2007, 96'40" ana. 1.85:1, st. + Extensive Extras, 180' c. P.

Sixty-nine DVDs in a month which is not yet over. The only months which have beaten that were ones when I scooped up a lot of newspaper freebies.

Many of the above are upgrades from VHS tapes. It continues to amaze me how often the technical details on the case are wrong. Aronofsky's addiction misery-fest is anamorphic 1.78:1, not 'scope as stated. I think the same error was reflected on the widesceen VHS. Cases which boast of widescreen version on the front are often early discs and turn out to be non-anamorphic, like My Beautiful Laundrette. Those Film 4 productions seem to have been mainly conceived for 1.66:1 for compatibility with the small screen.

Borley Rectory films seem to abound. This 2015 one is British-made and looks to bave been filmed on HD digital. Horror fans were unimpressed, noting that it is essentially an adultery-drama about Mrs Foyster and the lodger. The banal dialogue has been mocked online but it is the lack of any feeling for the period which hobbles this kind of production. I see that Mad Men, which always features in those box-set binge articles, is already a decade old. The fifties vibe has been highly-praised, though it is derived from Hitchcock and Sirk rather than felt life. The ironies of its guilt-free indulgence in drink and tobacco have impressed some viewers, though it could easily become too knowing and unsubtle. I see there were four more series but these three are more than enough to be going on with . . .

Speaking of Sirk, I know of the cult for his fifties women's pictures, though I have only three or four. The Universal boxed set used to show up in HMV and Fopp from time to time; I would snap it up at charity-shop price. Meanwhile, this Korean issue is useful with saturated Technicolor hues. It is formatted for 1.78:1, though I think Universal-International flat releases of that era were often 2:1.

I have never sat through all of A Fish Called Wanda, though I caught bits of it in passing; it never had much appeal, for some reason. I gather that unmatted television-showings revealed more of Cleese's genitalia than the cinema ratio. Would anyone hit pause for that? This two-disc edition has tons of Extras. Also Python-connected is Gilliam's Imaginarium picture. I thought of it as quite recent but I see it is a decade old already. Its intended weirdness was enhanced by the footage shot to adjust to the loss of Heath Ledger by acts of magical transformation. Certainly a curio, though Gilliam's surrealism can be alienating after a while.

Of more local interest is the documentary about Stockport's refurbished Plaza super-cinema. I keep resolving to go more often but their film-nights are not so frequent. The disc is anamorphic with sections devoted to the rebuild and the reopening, which starred Leslie Philips.

The brutalist Amores Perros comes from Brazil; the focus is on gangs and dog-fights. They assure us that no dogs were harmed in the filming. The odd extra may have . . . Two and half hours seems a long running-time for an obvious metaphor but my Latin American shelf is underpopulated. The International net has brought in an Italian tale of sibling-rivalry, a French romantic suspenser with hatchet-faced Cassel, another French sex-drama and an Icelandic saga about an albino boy. At the other end of the world, Herzog sets off to interview practically the whole population of Antarctica. I have little of his recent work. I see this one is already twelve years old. The two-disc edition looks very nice.

Middleton contributed a stash of horrors at rock-bottom price. Usual suspects Romero, Carpenter and Craven are represented by second-string entries, I think. I remember catching Shocker on a hotel's satellite system, when I was laid up with a streaming cold. Like The Evil Dead,it seemed essentially black comedy and made me laugh till my sinuses cleared.

Night School is a slasher-movie that got caught up in the Video Nasties affair. The Warner Archive disc seems to be region-free and represents the unedited version. I could do with the Bluray of the Laughton Island of Lost Souls, meanwhile this 1977 version of the Moreau nightmare features Burt Lancaster and Michael York. Mike Nichols is not a name I associated with the horror genre. His version of the Wolfman legend, features Jack Nicholson, which only makes me curious to see how he handles the human dimension. For me, the prize of the horrors was The Night of the Demon, which I had in only an off-air tape. This Columbia disc comes with the US edit, both in pillar-boxed anamorphic 1.66:1. The dark opening minutes are somewhat speckled though the quality is good. I understand the recent Bluray has a full restoration. I was chuffed that my 10p version came with the 24-page booklet.

Tequila Sunrise is a Mel Gibson thriller, helmed by Chinatown scribe Robert Towne. Another disc that turned out to be anamorphic when the cover says full-frame. I know nothing of Gus Van Sant's Gerry, a tale of male friendship. I imagine something like another Private Idaho with a Salt Lake setting. De Palma is far from a favourite with me. This tale of atrocities performed by US soldiers is closely-based on a real case but avoids claiming to be a documentary.

The Lynch film is another upgrade from a full-frame video. I understand that some of the lost footage has surfaced on recent editions of the Twin Peaks experience. I doubt if it will do much to explain anything. Testing the disc, I got as far as the aerodrome-scene with the mime . . .

That leaves a BBC travelogue, hung on the thread that Shakespeare must have visited Italy. As the pictures have become HD, the room for imagination atrophies. I've completed my three main series of LoG - hurrah! Then there is the documentary which gave us our first glimpses of Schwarzenegger in his muscle-mary prime. I saw this on the big screen, way-back, when it was mischievously partnered by A Bigger Splash, which riffed on the California lifestyle of David Hockney. We need more such double-bills! :pop:
 
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Graylien

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One of the retro charity shops in Headingley haas got their hands on a box full of something bizarre, not entirely sure if they're some format of wax cylinder (though they look longer than any pic of such I can find), mechanical piano rolls or some format of sheet music that's rolled up like a scroll.

Picked up one box and opened it, contents wrapped in fabric though so beyond being a long cylinder shape, didn't give much away.

Couldn't face asking the till lady what they were, may investigate further if they're still there next time I pass.
It sounds like they may be piano rolls. If they were sheet music they would likely be written in standard musical notation which is fairly easy to recognise.

If they are piano rolls then unless you are happy to keep them as mere ornaments then you would need access to a player piano to actually play and record them.

Were there any artist's names included with the rolls? If for example they were recorded by someone like Scott Joplin or Jelly Roll Morton then they could be worth a considerable sum of money if in good condition.

If on the other hand they are recordings of forgotten Edwardian ballads by forgotten pianists they are likely to attract little interest. Though there may be an obsessive collector on eBay who would find them desirable.

If they are wax cylinders then I'm afraid this is a topic I am utterly ignorant about.

Possibly you could buy them then take them to a specialist dealer who would be able to identify them. It basically depends on the price and how easy it would be to obtain a refund from the charity shop.
 

Shady

Mary Queen of Scots...temping as DEATHS Kitty
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They look like they in the music section, they are too big to be for music boxes?
 

JamesWhitehead

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you couldn't see the surface of the rolls
They are indeed pianola rolls. They seldom fetch large sums, as the collectors' market is limited. As bulky items, they can end up in the skip during house-clearances. I have never seen them in a charity shop. I sold off a couple of hundred of them, when I moved to Manchester, getting about a pound each for them. The buyers checked them for wear to the edges of the paper, which can cause mistracking. I have preserved the list somewhere. When I rediscover it, I will be hunting Youtube for transcriptions. Quite a lot of enthusiasts love to show off their reconditioned instruments.

By the look of them, the ones on that shelf are not the kind which recorded a celebrity pianist's performance. I cannot read enough to be certain whether they are 65-Note or 88-Note type. If the rolls have metal fittings on the side, they are 65-Note; the 88-Note type have a moulded recess. :)
 

Bad Bungle

Dingo took my tray bake.
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Two small framed pictures today: 'Lonesome Trees' etching signed and authenicated on the front and back (June 1986) by a local artist. Judging by his website I did well at 50p (the painting is much better than the photo). Also a print of 'La Tamatia' (a South American Puffbird), the original coming from a 1778 book of birds by Pierre Joseph Buchoz (also 50p).

Keenleyside0233.jpg Tamatia0234A.jpg
 

OneWingedBird

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They are indeed pianola rolls. They seldom fetch large sums, as the collectors' market is limited. As bulky items, they can end up in the skip during house-clearances. I have never seen them in a charity shop. I sold off a couple of hundred of them, when I moved to Manchester, getting about a pound each for them. The buyers checked them for wear to the edges of the paper, which can cause mistracking. I have preserved the list somewhere. When I rediscover it, I will be hunting Youtube for transcriptions. Quite a lot of enthusiasts love to show off their reconditioned instruments.

By the look of them, the ones on that shelf are not the kind which recorded a celebrity pianist's performance. I cannot read enough to be certain whether they are 65-Note or 88-Note type. If the rolls have metal fittings on the side, they are 65-Note; the 88-Note type have a moulded recess. :)
Thanks.

I've never seen them in a charity shop before either, even after getting on for 30 years of scouring them, also working at a retro clothes and furniture charity shop in the early 90s.

They look like something that would have been chucked.
 

Timelord2u

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Any time I find myself pointlessly browsing the CDs or DVDs in one charity shop or another, I reassure myself that I'm under no compulsion to buy anything, even if it is for a good cause. Or put another way, I'm not James, and I don't feel the need to acquire a copy of every DVD ever produced!

Seriously, James - fair play. You approach the acquisition of new recordings with a verve and attention to detail that I just can't manage! I imagine, in any case, that posterity will thank you. It's easy to overlook fairly mundane films and records, not least because some of them can be had for 50p or less in any High Street, but in years to come, when 99% of all CDs ever made are in landfill somewhere, we'll realise what we've missed.

Myself, I tend to get a sort of blindness when I browse the un-ordered spines of DVD cases in these shops, to the point where I don't really see most of them, and I tend to focus on looking for very specific items, such as X-Files or Dr Who discs, where a basic form of pattern-recognition helps me to locate what I'm after.

The other day, something among the massed ranks of discs in one of Sutton Coldfield's odder shops did stand out from the crowd, and I couldn't help taking a closer look. Rather than describe it, let me show you all what I subsequently bought for a mere £4.50:

View attachment 17533

At first, I thought it was something to do with Stargate, and was a collector's box of some sort that could actually be opened. But it was neither - to my surprise, it is a cube made of 6 pieces of plastic clipped together, each face containing a disc, not a DVD but a CD audiobook of part of a Doctor Who story. There are 2 discs for each of 3 tales: "The Cave Monsters", "The Auton Invasion" and "The Giant Robot":

View attachment 17534

Oddly, as a Who fan of some years' standing, I recall that none of the 3 titles are actually those under which the shows were broadcast - there were originally "The Silurians", "Spearhead from Space" and "Robot" respectively. Which is odd.

A bit of Googling shows that each of the 6 sides of the cube were sold with a mini-figure in a set called Pandorica something-or-other in 2010, referencing an entertaining but highly-unbelievable 11th Doctor story:
https://www.amazon.ca/Pandorica-Audiobook-Cyberman-Silurian-Warrior/dp/B004IIZ9N8

Anyway, something different to my usual haul...
The Pandorica opens ,maybe
 
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JamesWhitehead

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2 x DVDs, bought Middleton 29.05.2019, total price £1.98:
2721.D: Paísa, dir. Roberto Rossellini, 1946, 124' f/s, P.
2722.D: The Dreamers, dir. Bernardo Bertolucci, 2003, 110' ana. 1.85:1, st. + Commentary + Documentary, Featurette (1968) & Music Video, P.

Two Italian movies today, both with French connections. The Neo-Realist Rossellini arrives on the French Collection Ciné-Club label. I will have to manage with the Italian soundtrack with or without French subtitles, as English is not an option! The Dreamers is relatively late Bertolucci and deals with the Paris student rising of 1968, drawn from a book by Gilbert Adair. The Italian director chose to go with the incest theme and ditched the gay stuff. It has divided viewers and critics, some praising its beauty and atmosphere while others condemn it as voyeuristic and self-indulgent. :reyes:
 

Rushfan62

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My brother has had some interesting finds. He used to enjoy military modelling and found a box containing among other things, some thick leather belts. He bought it (to make boots for one sixth scale uniforms!) And was surprised to find a silver SS belt buckle attached to one of the belts! The box had cost him 50p, he sold the buckle at auction for around £70.
 

GNC

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2 x DVDs, bought Middleton 29.05.2019, total price £1.98:
2721.D: Paísa, dir. Roberto Rossellini, 1946, 124' f/s, P.
2722.D: The Dreamers, dir. Bernardo Bertolucci, 2003, 110' ana. 1.85:1, st. + Commentary + Documentary, Featurette (1968) & Music Video, P.

Two Italian movies today, both with French connections. The Neo-Realist Rossellini arrives on the French Collection Ciné-Club label. I will have to manage with the Italian soundtrack with or without French subtitles, as English is not an option! The Dreamers is relatively late Bertolucci and deals with the Paris student rising of 1968, drawn from a book by Gilbert Adair. The Italian director chose to go with the incest theme and ditched the gay stuff. It has divided viewers and critics, some praising its beauty and atmosphere while others condemn it as voyeuristic and self-indulgent. :reyes:
The IMDB keywords page is amusing. I think the gay stuff is mostly implied, but given the female third of the menage a trois is played by Eva Green, I can't say I blame him.
 

JamesWhitehead

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No discs but three mucky books in Harpurhey. Priced at £1 each, the girl on the till insisted they were just £0.99 for the three today.

I almost overlooked them, as their faux-leather look corresponds with so many cheap book-club editions but they turned out to be First Editions of Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn and Black Spring from The Grove Press, 1961 & 1963. I did not dare to think they were worth mega-bucks and indeed they are not. All the high-priced collectable Millers are European underground ones or the limited First Impression of the Grove issue, especially when signed.

The trilogy seems to have come in a slip-case.

Missing, as were the dust-jackets, though my set is nicer than the one illustrated on ebay: just one slight dink on the bottom of the front cover of Capricorn and a few tiny folded corners at the start of Black Spring. Ebay seller wants forty quid and seven pounds p & p. So not worth a fortune but a snip at £0.99! :cooll:
 

GNC

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I've seen the film of Tropic of Cancer and the image I took away from it was seeing comedienne Sheila Steafel topless. It was like seeing Bernard Cribbins naked or something. Henry, you dirty boy.
 
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