Charity Shop & Poundshop Finds

Timble2

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Yes, he rather incoveniently died. Selfish, quite frankly.
It's fortunate for cinema and the reputation and memory of Peter Sellers that Blake Edwards didn't have the technology to digitally resurrect Clouseau through CGI, he would have, if he could have. Fingers crossed that no-one else comes up with the idea..
 

JamesWhitehead

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A bright, clear, frosty day, so I zoomed up to Shaw. Or would have zoomed not crawled, had I started earlier. The aftermath of a bug kept me at low ebb; I got repeated urges to eat something sweet. What? I fancied nothing much.

What of the charity-shoppes? Doctor Kershaw's Hospice Emporium coughed up a plate of goodies to fork through . . .

9 x DVDs bought, Shaw, 29.11.2019, total price £4.50:
2739.D: The Shout, 1978, Skolimowski, ana. 1.78:1, 82'30"
2740.D: Quartet, 1981, Merchant-Ivory, ana. 1.78:1, 96' + Trailer, 2'04" + Insight, 6'02" + Interview, 11'15" + 3 trailers.
2741.D: Merchant Ivory Collection, 15'43" + 58'19" + 21'38" = duplicate.
2742.D: Nightwatching, 2007, Peter Greenaway, ana. scope, st. 135'24" + Interviews, 22'04" + 10'27" + 11'13" + 19'22"
2743.D: Rembrandt's j'accuse, dir. Peter Greenaway, doc. ana 1.78:1. st. 100'24" + 1'24" trailer
2744-45.D: Karaoke, 1996, dir. Renny Rye, wr. Dennis Potter, ana. 1.66:1, 50'21" + 48'32" + 48'56" + 63'15" = 211' c
2746-47.D: Cold Lazarus, 1996, dir. Renny Rye, wr. Dennis Potter, ana. 1.66:1, 52'06" + 52'22" + 57'08" + 59'33" = 221' c

The Shout is a film more often read-about than seen. Starring Alan Bates, it dates from the late seventies. There are long gaps in the career of Skolimowski but the cultural promotion of dissident Polish voices by the West tended to collapse with the Berlin Wall.

I remember seeing Merchant-Ivory's Quartet when it was new and being underwhelmed. It may play better in revival. Alan Bates, again, stars.

Nightwatching, Peter Greenaway's 2007 Rembrandt film, Nightwatching, comes in a twin-pack with his 2008 documentary Rembrandt's J'accuse. This was off my radar, for some reason, at the time. I look forward to catching-up with it. Greenaway keeps declaring his retirement from cinema. Visitors to Amsterdam will not be allowed to forget to visit The Nightwatch.

Dennis Potter's protracted demise was televised more or less live for the Nation in the mid-nineties. It was hard to avoid the impression that television's Old Guard were saluting an iconic figure from the medium's golden days. Much was made of the BBC and Channel Four sinking their rivalry to bring Potter's extensive last words to the small screen in the form of two mini-series, Karaoke and Cold Lazarus.

We are nearly a quarter-of-a-century on from that period. Time to reassess what seemed like acts of piety at the time? I did not watch them then - Potter's morphine-sustained farewell interview was generally deemed more compelling. :comphit:
 
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Frideswide

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Nightwatching, Peter Greenaway's 2007 Rembrandt film, Nighwatching, comes in a twin-pack with his 2008 documentary Rembrandt's J'accuse. This was off my radar, for some reason, at the time. I look forward to catching-up with it. Greenaway keeps declaring his retirement from cinema. Visitors to Amsterdam will not be allowed to forget to visit The Nightwatch.
Nightwatching is one of my most watched Greenaways. I'm not sure why, but it entrances me!


Dennis Potter's protracted demise was televised more or less live for the Nation in the mid-nineties. It was hard to avoid the impression that television's Old Guard were saluting an iconic figure from the medium's golden days. Much was made of the BBC and Channel Four sinking their rivalry to bring Potter's extensive last words to the small screen in the form of two mini-series, Karaoke and Cold Lazarus.
I remember - and I watched them at the times, enjoyed them and was moved.


We are nearly a quarter-of-a-century on from that period. Time to reassess what seemed like acts of piety at the time? I did not watch them then - Potter's morphine-sustained farewell interview was generally deemed more compelling.
yes, seemed like that then and still seems like that. I've seen the final interview several times and I still weep.
 

michael59

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I thought I entered the wrong thread topic when I read this last page of post entries. Had to double check. lol

We don't have very many charity shops left here in Edmonton, AB. I think they found it too difficult to compete with Wal Mart prices. The last garage sale I went was a great find. I saw this large box of purses (handbags) it was marked with a $5 price tag. I rummaged through and found a Louis Vuitton. I thought it was fake but, it turned out to be the real deal and worth $700.
 

maximus otter

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After having had it on my chazzy shop radar for some time, l finally found a CD of Vashti Bunyan’s (wotta name!) first waxing Just Another Diamond Day.

Now to find out if the rest of it matches the slight but charming Diamond Day.

maximus otter
 

cycleboy2

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After having had it on my chazzy shop radar for some time, l finally found a CD of Vashti Bunyan’s (wotta name!) first waxing Just Another Diamond Day.

Now to find out if the rest of it matches the slight but charming Diamond Day.

maximus otter
It does, it absolutely does. I only discovered her about three years ago thanks to a BBC4 Folk at the BBC programme – I'd also very strongly recommend her 1964-67 compilation, which has some beautiful songs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Some_Things_Just_Stick_in_Your_Mind_–_Singles_and_Demos_1964_to_1967
 

JamesWhitehead

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A 09.00 am interview was over by 9.40, so I headed down to Ashton-u-Lyne. A lady in one of the very cluttered Christian shops there persuaded me to buy a cassette digitizer gizmo. My own tape deck gave up the ghost a month or two back. I may make some enquiries and see if Richer Sounds can repair it. Meanwhile, I am a bit dubious about this new bit of kit. It lacks the software disc, for a start and seems intended only for Windows. The partly-torn-off orange label betrays the fact this SilverCrest-badged object was from Lidl and reduced to £10.40 in their slush-pile once-upon-a-time. I gave £5, today. I think the charity may be the winner on this one but we will see . . .

I think it was the RSPCA shop which rendered the Bluray set of the BBC Planet Earth series. £1.99 for the five discs seemed reasonable. I expect it to look nice.

I zoomed up to Oldham by 1 pm. The Spindles Centre was undergoing a corporate spasm with a newly-introduced and bug-ridden implementation of number-plate recognition on its carpark. Advisory folk everywhere on entry and exit to placate delayed customers. Ashton manages this business much better and has had the technology for years!

Was it worth my delay and £1.80 fee? I snapped up a 10-CD set of John Lill playing the complete Beethoven Sonatas for just £1 in a new Age Concern £1 outlet which had popped up near the old Post Office. These turn out to be the records he made for John Boydon's Enigma Records in the 70s, here badged as a Sanctuary Classics set from 2003. Lill was an excellent pianist, so the parking hassle may have been worth it.

Stops in Chadderton and Middleton on the way back produced nothing much of note, apart from some bargain cheeses and a little bottle of Fino at £3 from Tesco. :gent:
 

michael59

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A 09.00 am interview was over by 9.40, so I headed down to Ashton-u-Lyne. A lady in one of the very cluttered Christian shops there persuaded me to buy a cassette digitizer gizmo. My own tape deck gave up the ghost a month or two back. I may make some enquiries and see if Richer Sounds can repair it. Meanwhile, I am a bit dubious about this new bit of kit. It lacks the software disc, for a start and seems intended only for Windows. The partly-torn-off orange label betrays the fact this SilverCrest-badged object was from Lidl and reduced to £10.40 in their slush-pile once-upon-a-time. I gave £5, today. I think the charity may be the winner on this one but we will see . . .

I think it was the RSPCA shop which rendered the Bluray set of the BBC Planet Earth series. £1.99 for the five discs seemed reasonable. I expect it to look nice.

I zoomed up to Oldham by 1 pm. The Spindles Centre was undergoing a corporate spasm with a newly-introduced and bug-ridden implementation of number-plate recognition on its carpark. Advisory folk everywhere on entry and exit to placate delayed customers. Ashton manages this business much better and has had the technology for years!

Was it worth my delay and £1.80 fee? I snapped up a 10-CD set of John Lill playing the complete Beethoven Sonatas for just £1 in a new Age Concern £1 outlet which had popped up near the old Post Office. These turn out to be the records he made for John Boydon's Enigma Records in the 70s, here badged as a Sanctuary Classics set from 2003. Lill was an excellent pianist, so the parking hassle may have been worth it.

Stops in Chadderton and Middleton on the way back produced nothing much of note, apart from some bargain cheeses and a little bottle of Fino at £3 from Tesco. :gent:
I'd have been delighted with having a day like that. Great finds, you get home, put on some music, relax, have a snack and a glass of wine, good for you. :D

Here's hoping your interview went as well as the rest of your day. :bthumbup:
 

EnolaGaia

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This seemingly new-in-the-box baby bouncer was a great bargain at a Florida Goodwill store, and an even bigger bargain once the recipient saw what was inside ...

... until the police got involved.
Loaded gun inside baby gift bought at Florida thrift store

A woman who bought a baby shower gift at a Florida Goodwill store was shocked when the father-to-be opened the box and found a loaded semi-automatic rifle inside.

Veronica Alvarez-Rodriguez told the Northwest Florida Daily News that she and her husband stopped by the store in Valparaiso on Sunday as they were heading to a friend’s baby shower. She found a Baby Einstein’s bouncer that was unopened and appeared to be brand new for $9.99.

’’It was like the perfect gift for the baby shower,” Alvarez-Rodriguez said.

The father-to-be thought so too.

He shouted, ’’You guys got me a gun!” ...

While some of the guests laughed, Alvarez-Rodriguez said she and her husband were shocked. They called the Crestview Police Department.

Officers came to the party and checked the couple’s identifications to make sure they weren’t convicted felons ...

The responding officer initially allowed the father-to-be to keep the gun, which is a Mossberg 715T semi-automatic rifle. The next day police asked him to turn it over to the department.

The incident remains under investigation. There were no details on how the gun got into the box, which appeared unopened.

An employee at the Goodwill store said she couldn’t comment.

’’Goodwill has the best treasures for $9.99,” Alvarez-Rodriguez said.
SOURCE: https://apnews.com/3f58c7dee65f8c060158e37914e30154
 

escargot

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CarlosTheDJ

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A 09.00 am interview was over by 9.40, so I headed down to Ashton-u-Lyne. A lady in one of the very cluttered Christian shops there persuaded me to buy a cassette digitizer gizmo. My own tape deck gave up the ghost a month or two back. I may make some enquiries and see if Richer Sounds can repair it. Meanwhile, I am a bit dubious about this new bit of kit. It lacks the software disc, for a start and seems intended only for Windows. The partly-torn-off orange label betrays the fact this SilverCrest-badged object was from Lidl and reduced to £10.40 in their slush-pile once-upon-a-time. I gave £5, today. I think the charity may be the winner on this one but we will see . . .
The problem with these 'cassette digitisers' is that they are made from the lowest-quality components available. The audio will be poor.

You're better off repairing a tape deck and running a line-out directly to your computer.
 

Mythopoeika

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The problem with these 'cassette digitisers' is that they are made from the lowest-quality components available. The audio will be poor.

You're better off repairing a tape deck and running a line-out directly to your computer.
Yes, I thought that too. Even so, having done such a thing myself, I found that the sound quality of a tape-to-CD transfer was not good enough for me... so I gave up. Unless you have something you really must copy, it's probably not worth it.
 

Peripart

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I've posted several times before about my mild addiction to any random bag of Lego that I spot in a charity shop. This strange compulsion I have may possibly be related to my depression, a way of capturing some essence of a happier time, but I like to think that it's essentially harmless, and anyway, Lego is a quality product, too good to be restricted to children! Having said that, I think that charity shops are getting wise to the adult collectors of the stuff, and prices seem to be rising, which may well start to gently wean me off my habit. Before that happens, though, I did spot a bag the other day (actually, more like a basket, or even a punnet, if you will) priced at £12, which contained a 90% complete Lego X-wing (the orange and black one from The Force Awakens) along with about 25 Lego minifigures of various type - a lot of Ninjago stuff, but also various Snowtroopers, a Yoda, Poe Dameron and BB-8. Needless to say, I was helpless in the face of such treasure, and as a result, the local hospice shop is £12 better off.

Anyway, I did buy something slightly different recently, though you'll probably still consider it 1/3 or 2/3 childish, depending on your personal POV. This was a few weeks ago, but I just spotted the photo on my phone, so I thought I'd bore you all share it with you.
IMG_20191113_202519.jpg


Artemis is, as it says, another book by the now fairly well-known Andy Weir, who wrote The Martian, and this copy appears to be unread.

The Dr Who DVD contains 2 of my favourite Tennant episodes (not fussed about Tooth and Claw, to be fair). The Girl in the Fireplace scores highly in most polls of favourite stories from the modern series, and School Reunion has Sarah Jane Smith in it!

The model car, by maker unknown, is of a Mk1 Toyota MR2, a full-sized one of which I owned many years ago. I can't imagine why this example is done up as a police car - a less practical vehicle it's hard to imagine - but I might try to rectify that with sandpaper and a lick of paint at some time in the future.

Anyhow, that little lot set me back £2.50, and I think that was about fair.
 

cycleboy2

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One of my bargains of the year two days ago from a charity shop in Bristol – a Mondaine virtually identical to the one shown for...£4!! (Mine has a silver surround/winder) I spent £18 on a strap and battery and now have a perfect condition £149 watch for £22. They're my stone-cold favourite watch...
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1576849608247.png


My other favourite purchase of the year was from an Oxfam shop in Bristol. It was a smallish red case with China Gold co written on it (or something like that) with no indication of what was in there. When opened it contained five commemorative .999 pure embossed silver ingots from the Beijing Olympics, each one was one oz and it cost me £20 – the price of silver at the time was about £12 an oz. Somebody didn't do their maths properly...
 

JamesWhitehead

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Over to Droylsden today for a dredge of the tank. Came across a plastic bag, which turned out to contain a John Lewis phone set with two rechargable phones, one in mint condition. The bag also contained an unrelated HDMI-to-HDMI-plus-2 x RCA plugs-plus-stereo-mini-jack.
Not sure what that is used for but, as it had the only price-tag, £2, I got the whole bag for just that.

The rechargeable batteries had - sensibly - been taken out of the phones. I don't think they are taking much of a charge, so they may need replacing. I also need to find out how to use the set, as there is no brochure. I have also inherited a lot of new contacts: Edith, Hettie and Walter can expect calls, supposing I can get the thing to work*. I am assuming The Cutting Room is a hairdresser, not a circumcision school. :cheer:

Edit. I can get the phone(s) to ring, when dialled from my mobile. It temporarily destabilized my newly-reconnected internet, however. I think I need to properly tune them in to their new home. Or fling them. :thought:
 
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maximus otter

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...a plastic bag, which turned out to contain a John Lewis phone set with two rechargable phones...Edith, Hettie and Walter can expect calls...I can get the phone(s) to ring, when dialled from my mobile. It temporarily destabilized my newly-reconnected internet...
Huge Fortean potential here, of the “phone call from beyond the grave” type:

“When Doris died, we threw out all of her stuff. Weeks later, we started receiving mysterious calls, apparently from her phone, offering us cosmic wisdom and consolation along the lines of:

Hello? Hello? Is this fucking dead? Can anyone hear me? Do l need to reboot my router, or hardwire my dongle?

- lt’s changed our lives!”

maximus otter
 
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JamesWhitehead

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Up to Heywood today for some bargain-hunting at Morrisons - various veggies at 15p a pop. Only two of the charity shops were open - both, I think, Barnardo's. The one next-door to Morrisons had a good selection of DVDs at 30p each. So I got five:

2748-49.D: Nick Broomfield: The Leader, 1991 & His Big White Self, 2006, 2 documentaries on white suprematist Eugene Terre'blanche, 190'
2750.D: John Schlesinger: Yanks, 1979, ana. w/s, 133'
2751.D: Anthony Mann: Man of the West, 1958, ana. scope, 95'
2752.D: J. Lee Thompson: Mackenna's Gold, 1969, ana. scope, 123'

I vaguely recall Broomfield's original 1991 Channel Four documentary on Terre'blanche but dont' think I have ever seen his 2006 follow-up. Broomfield is usually categorized as a narcissist, with some justification, if I remember rightly, often placing himself at the centre of staged events. We shall see how these things have aged.

I remember being yanked off to see Yanks when it was new. Partly because it was Schlesinger but mainly because the friend had a friend who appeared as an extra. We expected a blink-and-miss-it moment but said friend was visible for some time in a scene set on a bus, IIRC! Friend is also a fan of Richard Gere but stands no chance, not being a practicing-gerbil. I rub this in from time to time.

Anthony Mann's Westerns are celebrated but I have not, so far, properly come to terms with them as a body of work. Here is one more limb to the body and it's Gary Cooper in one of his late rôles. Can't be bad.

British director J. Lee Thompson is usually described as a punchy, even sadistic director of violent action films; the original Cape Fear was one of his. Made for Columbia, Mackenna's Gold stars Gregory Peck and Omar Sharif, cast here as a "brutal Mexican bandit." Westerns of this period tended to get bloated, self-regarding and allied to the caper-genre, begging to be put out of their misery by Leone and Peckinpah. Thompson's entry, rated 15, may sit in the middle. :pipe:
 
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GNC

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Man of the West is a great film, Cooper was probably a bit too old for the lead but it looks fantastic, those huge vistas contrasting with the abyss-like darkness indoors. One of the most psychological of the psychological westerns of the 1950s. After this, Mann (who had a Fortean upbringing, as far as I can tell) opted for epics.

Mackenna's Gold is not one of Thompson's best. He liked working a lot, and that can mean the quality can vary wildly, certainly the case with him. Anyway, it features Julie Newmar (Catwoman) swimming nude, if that interests you.
 
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