Charity Shop & Poundshop Finds

ChrisBoardman

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I bought Urban Hymns by the Verve for just one pound. Then realised my only CD player is in my car.
 

Nosmo King

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Is it stone or enamel?
Definately some sort of white stone with blue veins

20210607_194320.png
 

Frideswide

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Definately some sort of white stone with blue veins

we are at cross purposes - I meant the orangey white russet necklace and earrings. Sorry!
 

JamesWhitehead

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Over to Swinton, again, this afternoon, for foraging in their charidee outlets.

Oxfam had Nosferatu, in a 2-disc Eureka set, for £1.99.

Eureka morphed into a quality outfit, offering art-house fare in restored prints, much like a Brit. outpost of Criterion. I think quite a lot of their stuff was licenced from that source. They emulated them with spine-numbers, when they instituted the Masters of Cinema Series.

Their early days were less glorious, however. Does anyone want to be reminded of that "longest-ever!" version of Metropolis, which just ran deadly-slow and had Stylophone noodlings for a soundtrack? I should think not!

So, this "full-length, restored" Nosferatu - 2 prints, 1 sepia, 1 b & w with Commentary track & Extras may be worth my two quid or may not.
The magnifying glass gives a probable date of 2000.

Current holdings are of the Photoplay restoration in an off-air tape and some mongrel PD version with swimmy visuals.

No mention of a score* on this Eureka version. Worth the punt? We will see . . . :thought:

*Edit: Amazon, ominously, promises a modern, electronic score by one "Art Zoyd" - nice name!

dvdcompare outs this restored version as being from 1987, not 1995. I gather Eureka did issue the Murnau-Institute restoration in 2007.
 
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GNC

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Eureka have been putting out some nice collector's editions silents on Blu-ray recently. Next week it's Conrad Veidt going nuts in The Hands of Orlac!
 

JamesWhitehead

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Droylsden and Openshaw are a natural double, supposing we brave the shared-road-space of traffic and trams down to Droylsden.

I suppose that was normal, once-upon-a-time.

The large Barnardo's at D. had some LPs @ 5 for a pound. I suppose someone's prized collection of ultra-rare Nelson Eddies will be a hard sell now. I took pity on some organ records etc.

5930.S: "Christmas in Venice," Monteverdi Choir, JEG, Decca SDD 363, 1972, Factory Sample, magenta label
5931.M: Peter Hurford recital, St. George's, Letchworth, Oryx 705, 1964
5932.S: Franck & Pupils, R. Downes, Brompton Oratory, Alpha SPHA 3015
5933.S: Roger Fisher recital, Parr Hall, Warrington, Wealden Studios, WS.221, r. 1984
5934.S: Delius: Double Concerto; Alan Bush: Sea Song Variations, RPO, Snashall, Del Mar, Pye GSGC 14073

You do get twerps advertising white-label and other test pressings at silly prices, so what am I bid for this early John Eliot Gardiner? The sleeve and insert notes are all present and correct. The Ace-of-Diamonds label is not on this hand-written sample.

Hurford went on to record the complete works of Bach for Decca, so here is another early outing.

The Alpha recording has an interesting paste-over, signalling the change-of-ownership of the company. Alpha was now part of Waverley Records, Edinburgh. This did not last very long. They were swallowed by SAGA, back in London. Queries are raised about whether Alpha tapes were genuine stereo. They were made - probably - that way. Whether later SAGA issues were is another question!

I did not know there was a Cavaillé-Coll organ in Warrington! But then, I am not a proper organ-nerd. Just enough of one to spot the record!

The Pye record is an interesting oddity. Cellist in the Delius Concerto was Gerald Warburg, heir to a banking dynasty. On the flip-side, we get a work by Alan Bush, Communist composer, best known, if at all, for his Dialectic, for String Quartet! John Snashall, who conducts the Bush, was more usually Pye's studio producer. The sleeve-note is by Ronald Stevenson, best known as a Busoni buff and the composer of the monumental Passacaglia on DSCH. :)
 

Analogue Boy

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The head of a children's hospice charity said he is "so angry" after thieves caused thousands of pounds worth of damage.
Tills, computers and doors were damaged during the break-in at the Acorns Children's Hospice shop in Kings Heath, Birmingham,
Toby Porter, the CEO of the charity, said the thieves had only taken about £100.
In a post on social media he said "it is just not acceptable".
Apparently, the thieves left DNA traces at the scene so police are having to go through medical records of 57 dead people and exhume them to remove them from their enquiries, investigate 4 crack addicted children who previously played Operation (without the battery in it), some ‘humanoid’ who collected Capodimonte and 12 cats and 2 dogs whose urine and stool samples contaminate the crime scene - as is usual for this sort of shop.
 

JamesWhitehead

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Missed from my obsessive documenting of charity-shop finds last month were three DVDs found in Middleton on the 12th:
2821.D: Funeral in Berlin, dir. Guy Hamilton, 1966, ana. scope, colour, 98'
2822.D: Charge of the Light Brigade, Tony Richardson, 1968, ana. scope, 125' + Interviews + 1912 short, 28' - supersedes 794.V
[NB: This BFI DVD features the American cut, some 6' shorter than the UK version on the scope VHS tape!]
2823.D: Odd Man Out, Carol Reed, 1947, f/s, b & w, 115' Korean disc, subtitles can be turned off, good quality
Considered to be the best work by Reed and star, James Mason, it seems to have evaded my grasp until now!

Sometimes classical collectors complain about the number of cheap reissues and compilations, which greatly outnumber first editions. The most popular boxed-sets in the slush-piles seem to be those flimsy Golden Overtures sets, which were pressed - in their millions? - for Woolworths! Seasoned crate-sifters can usually quickly sense the date and nature of the original collectors. Needless to say, it is rare to find a tranche of mint stuff from the Golden Age of first issue stereo, valve-engineered titles from the fifties and sixties. Silly prices asked - but seldom paid? - online for these things can muddy the waters. I have seen a few annoying non-collectors doing that on-the-spot Amazon-trawling, while hogging the crates. Luckily, they normally leave the classics alone!

These two opera sets were nice to find in Prestwich yesterday, for £1 each:
5935-36.S: Handel: Acis & Galatea, Boult, 1959, L'Oiseau-Lyre SOL 60011-12
5937-38.S: R. Strauss: Elektra, Solti, 1967, Decca SET 454-55

For a short time in the early stereo period, the Decca group experimented with packaging their sets in vinyl folders, rather than boxes or individual sleeves. They do not age well, usually but this set of the Sutherland Acis was near mint. All I needed to do was to replace the discs themselves in their own rear compartment, reserving the window at the front for the booklet. The Elektra comes from the time when they had reverted to stout boxes, emblazoned with the pleasingly-cinematic Decca Sonicstage identifier. Geeks also check-out the stamper-numbers and these are all first or second! :pipe:
 

Vardoger

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Bought a Canon MP280 printer for 50 NOK or £4.2. My old Canon printer's paper feeding tray stopped working properly and I had a few unused ink cartridges laying around. The new old printer worked like a charm after some simple fixing and still looks rather new.
 
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bugmum

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Oxfam, unfortunately (those gits research their prices…), but £9.99 is a lot better than £20.
Yes, my sister says Oxfam are eagle-eyed with anything of value. I once sent them a girl's Alice Temperley dress, pretty much pristine - I wonder if they pulled that one out of the pile and dispatched to head office for the website. I should have checked!
 

Nosmo King

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Yes, my sister says Oxfam are eagle-eyed with anything of value. I once sent them a girl's Alice Temperley dress, pretty much pristine - I wonder if they pulled that one out of the pile and dispatched to head office for the website. I should have checked!
In one of my local charity shops they had a plain white Versacè dress shirt priced at £20, i was tempted but at the end of the day i have half a dozen plain white designer dress shirts that i have bought from charity shops already, and i paid a lots less for them.if it was a different colour i would have bought it.
 

ramonmercado

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A book on my favourite tank:


ospgnm7036.jpg



Oxfam unfortunately (those gits research their prices…), but £9.99 is a lot better than £20.

maximus otter

i always donate my surplus books to Oxfam because I know they'll sell them on at a good price. I've even bought books in other charity shops for 50c each and given them directly to Oxfam knowing that they'll sell them in the €2.50 - €3.50 range.
 

Peripart

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I recently shared with you my renewed interest in First Day Covers, after finding that rather odd Grenada/South Georgia combo, and the bumper haul of around 40 more FDCs via my local hospice shop's Ebay page. As I've previously alluded to, they satisfy several areas of interest at the same time - the inherent pleasure of owning attractive objects, a callback to my childhood collecting days, and the added bonus that stamps & FDCs are also often a window into history.

Of course, it would be all too easy to venture down the Ebay rabbit hole and stock up with hundreds of items which I don't need, so when I found the items already posted here, they were obtained from local charity shops only, and I have decided to stick to that principle. That way, if I do end up buying worthless tat, at least I've done my bit for a deserving local charity!

Well, readers, I'm afraid that I've done it again. The hospice shop's Ebay page (yes, the same one as before) was recently listing a further 110 British FDCs, dating from 1970 to 1982, with a starting price in the low £20s. After a cautious but tense week of bidding, the prize was mine for just over £40. So I now have a further 100-odd covers, complete with album, and they are all ones I didn't already have. Yes, I do have covers with some of the stamps, but this time, almost all of my haul are different from before, as (for example) a set of 4 stamps will be on 4 separate envelopes, one stamp on each. What's more, most of the covers have a postmark which is relevant to the event being commemorated.
Zcover5.jpg
For example, if you look closer, these two are franked as follows:
Zcover7.jpg

... which is nice! It's also a great reminder of a time when a first-class stamp cost 8 1/2 p, and 13p got you something quite exotic!

Zcover6.jpg
 
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bugmum

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@Peripart my mother used to buy two of each set of FDC which she set aside for my sister and myself as an inheritance thing. There's a tin box of them knocking round my dad's house somewhere. I doubt they're worth much, but if I can get £40 for them when the time comes, that's better than nothing!
 

JamesWhitehead

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The revised numbering - I lose track, from time to time - means my last reported DVD find was:
2 x DVDs bought, Swinton 8.06.2021, total price £1.99:
2824-25.D: Nosferatu, 1922, 1987 restoration, Eureka, 2000 issue, 2 prints, 92' each + Comm. + Extras

Now, here is excitement, from Ashton-u-Lyne on Friday, 9th July:
2826-28.D: The Edgar Wallace Mysteries, Volume One, Network set of 3 DVDs with booklet of Kim Newman notes.

These wonderfully-drab B-pictures were a product of Merton Park Studios. They could play the bottom-half of cinema double-bills, though they had always one eye on their more natural television home.

So here is Urge to Kill; Clue of the Twisted Candle; Marriage of Convenience; The Man Who Was Nobody; Partners in Crime; Clue of the New Pin & The Fourth Square, all, I think, from around 1960.

I think I gave £1 for the set! :)
 

escargot

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@Peripart my mother used to buy two of each set of FDC which she set aside for my sister and myself as an inheritance thing. There's a tin box of them knocking round my dad's house somewhere. I doubt they're worth much, but if I can get £40 for them when the time comes, that's better than nothing!
They were hyped up as a collectable, 'future antique' sort of thing in the '70s. I used to send them to my nieces and nephews.
 

Dinobot

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The revised numbering - I lose track, from time to time - means my last reported DVD find was:
2 x DVDs bought, Swinton 8.06.2021, total price £1.99:
2824-25.D: Nosferatu, 1922, 1987 restoration, Eureka, 2000 issue, 2 prints, 92' each + Comm. + Extras

Now, here is excitement, from Ashton-u-Lyne on Friday, 9th July:
2826-28.D: The Edgar Wallace Mysteries, Volume One, Network set of 3 DVDs with booklet of Kim Newman notes.

These wonderfully-drab B-pictures were a product of Merton Park Studios. They could play the bottom-half of cinema double-bills, though they had always one eye on their more natural television home.

So here is Urge to Kill; Clue of the Twisted Candle; Marriage of Convenience; The Man Who Was Nobody; Partners in Crime; Clue of the New Pin & The Fourth Square, all, I think, from around 1960.

I think I gave £1 for the set! :)
Nosferatu! I must whip it out and have a good viewing as soon as possible!
 

JamesWhitehead

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Having smashed my cafetière last week, I was on the look-out for a new glass beaker, at the very least. There are usually dozens in the charidee shops. Suddenly, the only ones on display have been scratched and horrid.

Praying for a cafetière may have worked crookedly, though.

I found this in Chadderton. It's a stove-top machina but the brand is "La Cafetière!"

I like the enamel finish, as a nice change from the pitted die-cast look of my old one. The base section is round, instead of the traditional ten-sided original, of the Mussolini era. They call this pistachio colour; customers have suggested "duck-egg."

It was nearly new. Original owner had shoved coffee in the bottom and left it to stain. No wonder they were dissatisfied by the result.

A bit of bleach had it good-as-new. Not bad for £1.99! :)
 
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