Charity Shop & Poundshop Finds

cycleboy2

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Having smashed my cafetière last week, I was on the look-out for a new glass beaker, at the very least. There are usually dozens in the charidee shops. Suddenly, the only ones on display have been scratched and horrid.

Praying for a cafetière may have worked crookedly, though.

I found this in Chadderton. It's a stove-top machina but the brand is "La Cafetière!"

I like the enamel finish, as a nice change from the pitted die-cast look of my old one. The base section is round, instead of the traditional ten-sided original, of the Mussolini era. They call this pistachio colour; customers have suggested "duck-egg."

It was nearly new. Original owner had shoved coffee in the bottom and left it to stain. No wonder they were dissatisfied by the result.

A bit of bleach had it good-as-new. Not bad for £1.99! :)
I don't drink coffee - I've no taste for it (which as a cyclist and a journalist makes me virtually unique!) - but I'd really like to, just so I could use coffee paraphernalia like that. It's one of the best pieces of design ever.
 

Mythopoeika

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I don't drink coffee - I've no taste for it (which as a cyclist and a journalist makes me virtually unique!) - but I'd really like to, just so I could use coffee paraphernalia like that. It's one of the best pieces of design ever.
Try chocolate coffee.
 

escargot

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Having smashed my cafetière last week, I was on the look-out for a new glass beaker, at the very least. There are usually dozens in the charidee shops. Suddenly, the only ones on display have been scratched and horrid.

Praying for a cafetière may have worked crookedly, though.

I found this in Chadderton. It's a stove-top machina but the brand is "La Cafetière!"

I like the enamel finish, as a nice change from the pitted die-cast look of my old one. The base section is round, instead of the traditional ten-sided original, of the Mussolini era. They call this pistachio colour; customers have suggested "duck-egg."

It was nearly new. Original owner had shoved coffee in the bottom and left it to stain. No wonder they were dissatisfied by the result.

A bit of bleach had it good-as-new. Not bad for £1.99! :)

Great find! :D

Had one like that years (decades :omg:) ago. That distinct coffee aroma would fill the house.

Even now if I catch a whiff of it I think back to that summer, and that man...

He was a bad, bad boy. But he made a lovely cup of coffee. :evillaugh:
 

JamesWhitehead

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Driving back from the Salford region can be horrible on weekdays - or used to be - I have not tested it since Covid. Weekends are much easier, so I tend to associate Swinton, Salford and Eccles with Saturdays. If my ass is in gear and I get out early enough, the three can be done in one afternoon, before the charidee-dumps close.

This hot afternoon was a day for the trio, or triad of stops.

Swinton was first but it yielded no second-hand loot. Twelve small cans of chick-peas @ 5p. per tin seemed a good store-cupboard investment, from Asda, while Morrisons tempted me with a litre bottle of some Pimms clone and a 2-litre zeppelin-size PET of lemonade. Summer, innit!

Onwards to Eccles, home of the dead-fly cakes and probably Spike Milligan's spotty proto-teenager. I saw no cakes.

I did find a new cafetière! It looked a bit dingy but the £2 price was OK and I wanted only the glass vessel. When I got it home, it responded to some affection and turned out to be better-made than the surviving parts of my old one. It turned out to be branded La Cafetière - see above. They are not paying me for product-placements, though I think they should!

Salford's grim Shopping City precinct is easiest to omit, though it offers thirty minutes of free parking, for the brave. I was glad I went today; I picked up four interesting DVDs.

First there was 2843.D: The Magnificent Ambersons, which I had only on VHS tapes. It is not exactly a favourite, for all the fuss that some make over it. Lost masterpiece? What we have is a story which appears to be the backdrop or counterpoint to some foreground which never appears. It's not in the full-length script either! When it comes to Welles's other films, give me Journey into Fear, any night, even though his name is not on the canvas, his prints are all over it! There is a BluRay, which is said to be a lot better than this DVD but £1 seems about right for the Boring Ambersons.

In another shop, there were three DVDs for the price of two:

2840.D: The Last Valley, dir. James Clavell, 1970, Prism issue of ABC film, f/s? 121'
2841.D: Witness for the Prosecution, dir. Billy Wilder, 1957, non-ana. 1.66:1, b & w, 111'
2842.D: Moonfleet, dir. Fritz Lang, 1955, ana. scope, colour, 143' Dutch Region 2 Warners disc with some Extras

The Last Valley is the unknown make-weight here. The names Prism and ABC do not inspire much confidence in the quality of the print or transfer. That's a shame, since it was the last movie to be made in the Todd-AO 70mm process. It is set in the Thirty-Years War and
sounds quite intriguing on the Wikipedia page.

I was delighted to fill two conspicuous gaps in my Wilder and Lang catalogues. I dimly recall catching the Wilder film on television, back in the Seventies, my attention split between it and my bedridden grandmother, in her dementia days. It seemed then to be an interminable courtroom star-vehicle, interrupted by numerous ad-breaks. I was startled to find out that it was a Billy Wilder film. It deserves another chance, for sure.

Lang's animadversions on Cinemascope as a thing suited only to snakes and funerals, did not prevent him making the lavish MGM costume-drama Moonfleet in that format. I hope this Dutch disc has English soundtrack and removable subtitles. One day, I hope to track down Lang's ground-breaking lynching-drama Fury, which seems hard to find in the UK. :pipe:
 
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Dinobot

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Great find! :D

Had one like that years (decades :omg:) ago. That distinct coffee aroma would fill the house.

Even now if I catch a whiff of it I think back to that summer, and that man...

He was a bad, bad boy. But he made a lovely cup of coffee. :evillaugh:
Wait, I made you coffee?
 

Nosmo King

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One day, I hope to track down Lang's ground-breaking lynching-drama Fury, which seems hard to find in the UK.
There are a few listings online

Screenshot_20210718-070337.jpg


https://www.onbuy.com/gb/fury-1936-...NjI2MDEzMzAyLCJibWMiOiIwLjAifQ==&lid=32468596
 

JamesWhitehead

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If you think you'll like it, you probably will.

I might like it better on Youtube than on the disc I found!

The disc - to be fair, it did admit to being 4:3 ratio - lived down to its ABC-Prism pedigree, taunting the viewer with the titles in letterbox and reverting to pan-and-scan 4:3 for the rest.

The version on Youtube is stated to be 720 dpi and gives the full width!

It is resisting my usual download-options. To stream or not to stream . . . not bloody likely, once the ads start! :doh:
 

GNC

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It really needs a Blu-ray for that wonderful scenery.
 

cycleboy2

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Couple of Saturdays ago I had a very good morning: three railway books for my dad's birthday and a couple of Wentworth wooden jigsaws (complete with whimsy pieces with an aeronautical theme... and a goat!) for £3.50 each. This was the best of them:

IMG_3597 copy.jpg
IMG_3600 copy.jpg
IMG_3601 copy.jpg
 

JamesWhitehead

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It has not been for lack of trying but serendipity has been meagre recently. Trips to Stockport, Ashton, Hyde, Shaw, Heywood and other places equally glamorous have seen me returning with an empty bag, at least as far as the charity shops go. Not worth the petrol!

Prestwich offered a few crumbs on Friday, 23rd: 2 LPs for £1:
5939.M: Geminiani: 6 Concerti Grossi, Op.3, Barchet Quartet & Stuttgart Pro Musica, Reinhardt, Dover HCR.5209, r. 1960 c
5940.S: Walton: Symphony No.1, RLPO, Handley, ASV ACM.2006, r. 1978

Dover turned out to be the records wing of the US publishing-house, which used to do a good trade in cheap reprints of classical scores and American literature that had fallen into the Public Domain. I did not know they issued LPs. Not many made it over the pond, anyway. The above example looks like one that would have appeared on Vox here, probably licenced from one of those German boutique labels.

The Walton was a mint copy of a disc that had been on my shopping-list for decades. Not so much for its virtues as the fact it had once been borrowed from the record library. Just about 25 of those suckers left to bag! I could track them all down on the internet but I like to let them arrive as windfalls! This was how 45 minutes of my youth was spent; such a thrill to re-live them, theoretically!

On Saturday, I settled for Cheetham Hill, which yielded a Bluray! :yay:

Bluray bought, Cheetham Hill 31.07.2021, total price £1:
054.BR: Fellini: Satyricon, 130' Eureka, 2015 edition, 'scope + booklet + trailer

I see that this film was an early DVD purchase - 009.D, bought 07.05.2004. Where does time go!

I can't say the Satyricon is a great favourite - not even my favourite Fellini - but it might as well be seen in its full baleful glory! :)
 
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GNC

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"Baleful" is a good word for Satyricon! Not even historically accurate (I'm not an expert), but supposedly a tirade against the decadence of modern Rome through Ancient eyes. The Blu-ray looks great, apart from the deliberate revulsion of the imagery (!).
 

cycleboy2

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"Baleful" is a good word for Satyricon! Not even historically accurate (I'm not an expert), but supposedly a tirade against the decadence of modern Rome through Ancient eyes. The Blu-ray looks great, apart from the deliberate revulsion of the imagery (!).
Satyricon is one of two films I saw at Bath's short-lived Regency Cinema (a pub - the Regency - with its own cinema); the other was The Eyes of Laura Mars. I remember more of the latter than the former but I think they show I was an eclectic cinemagoer in my younger days...
 

GNC

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Satyricon is one of two films I saw at Bath's short-lived Regency Cinema (a pub - the Regency - with its own cinema); the other was The Eyes of Laura Mars. I remember more of the latter than the former but I think they show I was an eclectic cinemagoer in my younger days...

Fantastic! I did read a defence of Laura Mars saying it showed a perfect time capsule of pre-clean up New York, therefore it was actually brilliant. Maybe you had to be there...
 

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Popped into a local charity shop t'other day - first time in ages - and spotted some men's lovely cycling bib shorts, BNWT, for £7.50.
There'd been a matching shirt too which had already been sold. The shorts were snapped up RIGHT away and Techy went out in them next day.

The full set cost nearly £30. I'm in town again tomorrow so will have another rummage around!
 

EnolaGaia

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This British Columbia man suspects his thrift store picture purchase may be a 19th century original painting worth $20,000 or more.
Painting bought at thrift store could be worth more than $20,000

A man who bought a painting from a British Columbia, Canada, thrift store for $96 said he discovered the piece could be worth more than $20,000.

Stephen Burgess, of Courtenay, said he regularly purchases art and frames from thrift stores to decorate his home, and on his recent visit to Value Village in Courtenay, a painting in an ornate frame caught his eye. ...

Burgess did a Google search for the artist's signature, Wijmer, and determined it was likely a mass-produced print of a piece by Dutch artist Gerritjen Wijmer, who was born in 1870.

He bought the painting for $96, intending to reuse the frame elsewhere, but during a closer examination he found a stamp from Munich, Germany, on the back of a canvas and oil brush strokes on the perimeter of the canvas under the frame, indicating it could be an original. ...

Burgess said his research indicates Wijmer paintings can sell for $20,000 to $350,000, depending on their condition. He said he is seeking a professional appraiser to confirm the authenticity of the artwork. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2021/0...could-be-worth-more-than-20000/7491628710735/
 

JamesWhitehead

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The summer months have brought a lot of bargain food and drink from the supermarkets but not a lot of treasures from the charity-shops.

Two recent movies - well, 2018/19 - showed up in Ormskirk on 24th August and Heywood on 3rd September:

DVD bought, Ormskirk, 24.08.2021, total price £1
2844.D: Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, dir. Quentin Tarantino, 2019, ana. scope, 155' + 7 additional scenes

DVD bought, Heywood, 03.09.2021, total price £1
2845.D: Peterloo, dir. Mike Leigh, 2018, 148' + Commentary + Extras, 6'00" + 5'25" + 3'14"

I have posted in Coincidences of the way a David Oistrakh video compilation turned up just a day or so after reading the obituary of his son. That disc would not mount on the computer, where I was testing them but it plays fine in the Bluray player. Oistrakh was all chins and scowl, though he was said to be a charming man, albeit a stern tutor to his son, Igor. These rare video recordings were made by the BBC in London, with Colin Davis and in France with his regular partner, Lev Oborin, all from the early 1960s.

4 x DVDs bought, Rochdale, 08.09.2021, total price £2
2846.D: David Oistrakh compilation, r. 1958-62, f/s, mono, 75'57"
2847-49.D: Mad Men, Season 6, 13 episodes x 46' c, + Extras, 28'24" + 25'10", 2013, 596' ana. 1.78:1

6 x DVDs bought, Eccles, 11.09.2021, total price £2:
2850-52.D: Mad Men, Season 4, 13 episodes x 46' c, + Extras,
2853-55.D: Mad Men, Season 5, 13 episodes x 46' c, + Extras,

Not sure if I will take to the American series, set in Madison Avenue. It was name-checked a lot, when box-set bingeing was a thing, probably just second to Breaking Bad. In case I get addicted, it is best to lay in the complete sets, when they are just £1 the season. Just the two-parts of Season Seven to come . . .

I had a premonition that today might bring some sheet-music and it came to pass. Eccles provided!

Four bound volumes of "The Music Lovers' Portfolio" look to start in 1921. They were edited by Landon Ronald, before he was a Sir. He was knighted in 1922, so these are antiques! Articles by Ernest Newman, Luisa Tetrazzini, Mark Hambourg etc, etc. Nice condition.

So, too, were three hardback Novello vocal scores: Judas Maccabeus, Saint Paul and Gounod's Redemption. It is the last clinker of an oratorio which delighted me most, for there are two press cuttings pasted in. At the front, we get an account of a performance under Charles Hallé at St James's Hall. This was given on the 23rd February, 1883. In the back, there is a long account of the work's first performance at the Birmingham Festival in, I think, 1882. More delightful than that, there is a paragraph appended about Georgina Weldon's* dramatic arrival at the première, though she was barred! Weldoniana is always fun. I doubt if this gem is a new find but it is grand to have it in an authentic, contemporary snipping!

*Newcomers to Georgina Weldon could start here . . .

I gave £5 for the job-lot, though I could have had them for £3.50. I will probably go to Heaven now! :yay:

Elsewhere in Eccles, seven dainty, plain white side-plates looked unused. I snapped them up at 10p. each and donated the rest of the quid so that I could boast of it here! Heaven is assured!
 
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Mythopoeika

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The summer months have brought a lot of bargain food and drink from the supermarkets but not a lot of treasures from the charity-shops.

Two recent movies - well, 2018/19 - showed up in Ormskirk on 24th August and Heywood on 3rd September:

DVD bought, Ormskirk, 24.08.2021, total price £1
2844.D: Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, dir. Quentin Tarantino, 2019, ana. scope, 155' + 7 additional scenes

DVD bought, Heywood, 03.09.2021, total price £1
2845.D: Peterloo, dir. Mike Leigh, 2018, 148' + Commentary + Extras, 6'00" + 5'25" + 3'14"

I have posted in Coincidences of the way a David Oistrakh video compilation turned up just a day or so after reading the obituary of his son. That disc would not mount on the computer, where I was testing them but it plays fine in the Bluray player. Oistrakh was all chins and scowl, though he was said to be a charming man, albeit a stern tutor to his son, Igor. These rare video recordings were made by the BBC in London, with Colin Davis and in France with his regular partner, Lev Oborin, all from the early 1960s.

4 x DVDs bought, Rochdale, 08.09.2021, total price £2
2846.D: David Oistrakh compilation, r. 1958-62, f/s, mono, 75'57"
2847-49.D: Mad Men, Season 6, 13 episodes x 46' c, + Extras, 28'24" + 25'10", 2013, 596' ana. 1.78:1

6 x DVDs bought, Eccles, 11.09.2021, total price £2:
2850-52.D: Mad Men, Season 4, 13 episodes x 46' c, + Extras,
2853-55.D: Mad Men, Season 5, 13 episodes x 46' c, + Extras,

Not sure if I will take to the American series, set in Madison Avenue. It was name-checked a lot, when box-set binging was a thing, probably just second to Breaking Bad. In case I get addicted, it is best to lay in the complete sets, when they are just £1 the season. Just the two-parts of Season Seven to come . . .

I had a premonition that today might bring some sheet-music and it came to pass.

Four bound volumes of "The Music Lovers' Portfolio" look to date from the early 1920s. They were edited by Landon Ronald, before he was a Sir. Articles by Ernest Newman, Luisa Tetrazzini, Mark Hambourg etc, etc. Nice condition.

So, too, were three hardback Novello vocal scores: Judas Maccabeus, Saint Paul and Gounod's Redemption. It is the last clinker of an oratorio which delighted me most, for there are two press cuttings pasted in. At the front, we get an account of a performance under Charles Hallé at St James's Hall. I should be able to date this. In the back, there is a long account of the work's first performance at the Birmingham Festival in, I think, 1882. More delightful than that, there is a paragraph appended about Georgiana Weldon's dramatic arrival at the event, though she was barred! Weldoniana is always fun. I doubt if this gem is a new find but it lovely to have it in the authentic, contemporary form!

I gave £5 for the job-lot, though I could have had them for £3.50. I will probably go to Heaven now! :yay:
You are the MASTER of the bargain, and I tip my hat to you!
 

maximus otter

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ChasFink

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I'm not supposed to visit any more charity shops, but found myself in Reclamation and picked this up for 50p.

View attachment 44558 View attachment 44559

l’d never heard of this Mustard Club before. A little Googling reveals that in the early Thirties it was possibly the world’s first guerrilla advertising campaign, and that it was dreamt up and managed by Dorothy L. Sayers, the noted writer of detective novels!

maximus otter

Apparently the association with Colman's made it advertising, and prohibited the claims underlined below in a different iteration of the rules:

THE RULES OF THE MUSTARD CLUB:
1. Every Member shall on all proper occasions eat Mustard to improve his appetite and strengthen his digestion;
2. Every Member shall once at least during every meal make the secret sign of the Mustard Club by placing the mustard-pot six inches from his neighbour’s plate;
3 Every Member who asks for a sandwich and finds that it has no mustard shall publicly refuse to eat the same;
4. Every Member shall see that the Mustard is freshly made, and no Member shall tip a waiter who forgets to put Mustard on the table;
5. Each Member shall instruct his children to keep that ‘schoolboy digestion’ by forming the habit of eating Mustard.”

Yet, oddly, a different rule touts the therapeutic merits of a mustard bath.
 

maximus otter

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Apparently the association with Colman's made it advertising, and prohibited the claims underlined below in a different iteration of the rules:

THE RULES OF THE MUSTARD CLUB:
1. Every Member shall on all proper occasions eat Mustard to improve his appetite and strengthen his digestion;
2. Every Member shall once at least during every meal make the secret sign of the Mustard Club by placing the mustard-pot six inches from his neighbour’s plate;
3 Every Member who asks for a sandwich and finds that it has no mustard shall publicly refuse to eat the same;
4. Every Member shall see that the Mustard is freshly made, and no Member shall tip a waiter who forgets to put Mustard on the table;
5. Each Member shall instruct his children to keep that ‘schoolboy digestion’ by forming the habit of eating Mustard.”

Yet, oddly, a different rule touts the therapeutic merits of a mustard bath.

Proper mustard, too, not that paediatric eye ointment that you chaps from the Colonies call “mustard”.

;)

maximus otter
 

Kryptonite

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I bought the first two Adrian Mole books (Secret Diary and Growing Pains) today for 25p each.

I read these as a teenager (I remember reading the second one on a train from Preston to Glasgow), but have the feeling that, much as i enjoyed them, I'll get more from them now. I think a lot of the detail probably went over my head when I read them back in the 80s!
 
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