Charity Shop & Poundshop Finds

Kryptonite

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More books. Which is kind-of cancelling our the effectiveness of the clear-out I had only a few weeks ago.

Today I bought;
2 Van der Valk novels, nice old penguin editions,

A book that calls itself a survey of Isaac Asimov's fiction. Possibly interesting and insightful, possibly quite a dry read, but I'll find out in good time.

And

A big thick doorstop of a book compiling decades of Arthur C Clarke's non-fiction writing.
 

escargot

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Popped into a charity shop today and picked up an orange hi-viz cycling jacket, XXXL size, looks new.

I reckon someone ordered it but it didn't fit because it's actually about an XL. So they sent it to the charity shop specially for me.

I'd been looking for a large-sized light waterproof that will fit over everything I'm wearing to carry on bike rides.

This one is perfect, and cheap. :bthumbup:
 

Dinobot

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Broadcasting from the moon...
Popped into a charity shop today and picked up an orange hi-viz cycling jacket, XXXL size, looks new.

I reckon someone ordered it but it didn't fit because it's actually about an XL. So they sent it to the charity shop specially for me.

I'd been looking for a large-sized light waterproof that will fit over everything I'm wearing to carry on bike rides.

This one is perfect, and cheap. :bthumbup:
May I say how stylish you look in it?:loveu:
Dvld4mzXQAU3Me_.jpg
 

escargot

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I bought the first two Adrian Mole books (Secret Diary and Growing Pains) today for 25p each.

I read these as a teenager (I remember reading the second one on a train from Preston to Glasgow), but have the feeling that, much as i enjoyed them, I'll get more from them now. I think a lot of the detail probably went over my head when I read them back in the 80s!
My teenage kids had those when they came out and immediately started keeping diaries. :chuckle:

Have you read her other works? Just thinking about The Queen and I brings tears to my eyes.

(I admired Townsend, who suffered terrible health for most of her adult life. When she died I could have slapped her for smoking and not taking care of herself.)
 

Kryptonite

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Have you read her other works? Just thinking about The Queen and I brings tears to my eyes.
Unfortunately I haven't (with the exception of one of the later Mole books). But I would like to read more of her stuff, I'll keep the Queen and I in mind.
 

escargot

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Unfortunately I haven't (with the exception of one of the later Mole books). But I would like to read more of her stuff, I'll keep the Queen and I in mind.
There was a xmas TV fillum made of it a few years ago, with a starry cast. :cool:
 

cycleboy2

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More books. Which is kind-of cancelling our the effectiveness of the clear-out I had only a few weeks ago.

Today I bought;
2 Van der Valk novels, nice old penguin editions,

A book that calls itself a survey of Isaac Asimov's fiction. Possibly interesting and insightful, possibly quite a dry read, but I'll find out in good time.

And

A big thick doorstop of a book compiling decades of Arthur C Clarke's non-fiction writing.
Nothing wrong with Nicholas Freeling's Van der Valk novels, and his Henri Castang books are really worth checking out too. He wrote loads more Castang books than VdV, and I love this quote from Wikipedia about him: "He began writing during a three-week prison sentence, after being convicted of taking home some veal from a restaurant where he worked, though that was common practice in the restaurant trade."

That's just... marvellous. I think that's the right word. (So I hope the Wikipedia story's true!)
 

escargot

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"He began writing during a three-week prison sentence, after being convicted of taking home some veal from a restaurant where he worked, though that was common practice in the restaurant trade."
There's surely a backstory. Maybe he was set up over a grudge.

Every I know who works in catering has a negotiation going on about how much surplus food workers can take home or what they can eat while at work. It varies from kitchen to kitchen and sometimes even between chefs on different shifts.
@Swifty will know all about it.
 

Swifty

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There's surely a backstory. Maybe he was set up over a grudge.

Every I know who works in catering has a negotiation going on about how much surplus food workers can take home or what they can eat while at work. It varies from kitchen to kitchen and sometimes even between chefs on different shifts.
@Swifty will know all about it.
I certainly do. I used to work at an awesome carvery and I'd take a back pack full of plastic tubs because part of my job was to throw away anything that hadn't been sold from the carvery including huge joints of traditional meats like beef, turkey and glazed ham as well as about eight different types of veg. The Mrs loved me bringing that home. We used to get so much of that, I had to give loads of it away to neighbours.
 

escargot

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I certainly do. I used to work at an awesome carvery and I'd take a back pack full of plastic tubs because part of my job was to throw away anything that hadn't been sold from the carvery including huge joints of traditional meats like beef, turkey and glazed ham as well as about eight different types of veg. The Mrs loved me bringing that home. We used to get so much of that, I had to give loads of it away to neighbours.
I remember you posting about that. What a brilliant perk. :cool:

Someone who used to post on'ere was married to a food company driver who'd bring home surplus bulk chilled and frozen goods like meat and cheese. He'd pay a nominal amount like 50p an item to make it legal.

As they never knew what was coming from week to week she invested in a big freezer and labelled everything carefully in family-sized portions.

One time it was a load of packs of pastry. I'd have loved that. Making pastry is tedious but pies're ace, you can make them with anything.
 

Swifty

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I remember you posting about that. What a brilliant perk. :cool:

Someone who used to post on'ere was married to a food company driver who'd bring home surplus bulk chilled and frozen goods like meat and cheese. He'd pay a nominal amount like 50p an item to make it legal.

As they never knew what was coming from week to week she invested in a big freezer and labelled everything carefully in family-sized portions.

One time it was a load of packs of pastry. I'd have loved that. Making pastry is tedious but pies're ace, you can make them with anything.
It was an ace perk Skargs but people will also tell you ... when you're working with the same food everyday, you get fed up with it, even when it is free. You dream of going home and having cheese on toast instead. Most of the chefs I've worked with do the same thing. The only place I've worked where I never got bored was a food packing plant in Burton on Trent. One of the lines was packing Chinese roast duck halves which I adore. They're very expensive in supermarkets but I could buy a large bag of 6 for just 50p. I used to live off them and also bring a few bags home to give to my landlady, her boyfriend and his dog because they didn't have any money and she was kindly letting me live there for only twenty quid a week so we all lived on duck for a while (and a few other things) .. and I'm still not sick of duck
 

escargot

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It was an ace perk Skargs but people will also tell you ... when you're working with the same food everyday, you get fed up with it, even when it is free. You dream of going home and having cheese on toast instead. Most of the chefs I've worked with do the same thing. The only place I've worked where I never got bored was a food packing plant in Burton on Trent. One of the lines was packing Chinese roast duck halves which I adore. They're very expensive in supermarkets but I could buy a large bag of 6 for just 50p. I used to live off them and also bring a few bags home to give to my landlady, her boyfriend and his dog because they didn't have any money and she was kindly letting me live there for only twenty quid a week so we all lived on duck for a while (and a few other things) .. and I'm still not sick of duck
You'll know about our local pie factory, where workers can snack free on produce at work and buy it cheap at the site shop.

When mechanics from the company I worked for nearby would fix the pie vans we'd be rewarded with trays of hot top-quality pies on which the workers would greedily fall. Lovely food.

However, I'd often see the pie workers leaving for breaks or going home. Most were fat, and some were enormous, like American fat.

Fair put me off pies. I love them and occasionally make my own but I remember those workers so don't overdo it. :chuckle:
 

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Found a book in a charity shop this morning called the Alien Abduction Files, by Kathleen Marden and Denise Stoner and a foreward by the man who is always referred to as Stanton T Friedman Nuclear Physicist.
 

Kryptonite

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That said, I'd never haggle in a charity shop, either - I've seen people try it, and I think that's pretty low (unless an object is clearly marked way too high, such as the LPs previously mentioned, in which case a polite word to the manger would be in order).

Re: haggling in charity shops. I personally wouldn't do it, as I think it goes against the spirit of charity, and also the shop has the right to ask whatever price they see fit- they can lower it if the item doesn't sell.

Something I've seen a couple of times, which in my opinion is not a decent way to act, is people who've taken an item to the till, had it put in a bag and the sale rung up, THEN started haggling over the price. What reason is there for that other than hoping the assistant will feel under pressure enough to cave in? Tight fisted gets. In my opinion.
 

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Re: haggling in charity shops. I personally wouldn't do it, as I think it goes against the spirit of charity, and also the shop has the right to ask whatever price they see fit- they can lower it if the item doesn't sell.

Something I've seen a couple of times, which in my opinion is not a decent way to act, is people who've taken an item to the till, had it put in a bag and the sale rung up, THEN started haggling over the price. What reason is there for that other than hoping the assistant will feel under pressure enough to cave in? Tight fisted gets. In my opinion.
I think to do so would be completely mean-spirited.
I guess some people can't help themselves, even when confronted with an already amazing bargain.
 

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Yeah, me too, and I am one of natures great hagglers.

(No doubt in the Casbah I would look a rank amateur)

Anyhow, Village tabletop today; I scored

A genuine 70s skateboard. (Seller made me promise not to break anything on it)

3 pairs Scarpa hiking boots. (too big but a bargain at £5 the lot)
 

Mythopoeika

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I just dumped off 2 big bags full of stuff at my local Keech shop. Mostly books.
Stuff I'll probably never read again.

I left a whole load of books at the charity collection point at work the other day (in the canteen, people leave books and DVDs for sale at £1 each, collecting for MIND). It was mostly my Dad's whole collection of Clive Cussler books.
 

bugmum

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It was mostly my Dad's whole collection of Clive Cussler books.
I think my Dad has a collection of those. When he finally tuns toes-up, I'll be happy to take the Tom Clancys and possibly the Wilbur Smiths, but Clive Cussler, Hornblower and Sharpe are definitely heading for the charity shops!
 

JamesWhitehead

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Curtains!

After thirty years, replacement of mine was overdue.

Only the back ones get significant sunlight and those were due for the tip - they were perishing and tearing.

The front ones responded very well - considering - to laundering. Yet the substance had gone out of them and ironing loomed - I don't think those kind of creases ever just fall out, do they?

Browsing for replacements, I discovered, with a shudder, that tape-topped curtains have gone out of fashion. Those hideous, large-eyelet things are ubiquitous!

The charity-shops came to the rescue. It is well-worth browsing those rails, with your measurements in your clammy hands . . .

Not that you can take their sizes seriously. It's like reading a toilet-wall!

Anyhow, the upstairs was re-curtained rather splendidly for the grand sum of £13.50. I am learning to love the lined, peach-coloured satin of the bedroom*. Sunny, even when it isn't outside! The sitting-room has a neutral pair and they are hanging well, with their matching tie-backs.

Both pairs had clearly displeased their original owners, for some reason but they were essentially brand-new and good quality.

:loveu:


*84" drop, not the claimed 90" They cover the window well enough but come to a halt above the skirting-board. "Tart's Knickers!" sneered a friend. Nice lining, though!
 
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bugmum

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Browsing for replacements, I discovered, with a shudder, that tape-topped curtains have gone out of fashion. Those hideous, large-eyelet things are ubiquitous!
Not online. We have replaced nearly all our curtains in the last two years (they were over twenty years old so it wasn't on a whim), and most of the online places have given the option of pencil pleats. John Lewis too! Okay, so we paid more than £13.50, but it is possible to find taped ones out there...
 

escargot

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Curtains!

After thirty years, replacement of mine was overdue.

Only the back ones get significant sunlight and those were due for the tip - they were perishing and tearing.

The front ones responded very well - considering - to laundering. Yet the substance had gone out of them and ironing loomed - I don't think those kind of creases ever just fall out, do they?

Browsing for replacements, I discovered, with a shudder, that tape-topped curtains have gone out of fashion. Those hideous, large-eyelet things are ubiquitous!

The charity-shops came to the rescue. It is well-worth browsing those rails, with your measurements in your clammy hands . . .

Not that you can take their sizes seriously. It's like reading a toilet-wall!

Anyhow, the upstairs was re-curtained rather splendidly for the grand sum of £13.50. I am learning to love the lined, peach-coloured satin of the bedroom*. Sunny, even when it isn't outside! The sitting-room has a neutral pair and they are hanging well, with their matching tie-backs.

Both pairs had clearly displeased their original owners, for some reason but they were essentially brand-new and good quality.

:loveu:


*84" drop, not the claimed 90" They cover the window well enough but come to a halt above the skirting-board. "Tart's Knickers!" sneered a friend. Nice lining, though!
I used to make/alter curtains and blinds and ended up with a huge paint tub of fixings.

It'll all probably go to a charity shop some day especially for old farts traditionalists like us.
 

JamesWhitehead

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I expected three charity shops to be open in Chadderton Precinct this afternoon; only one was.

Encouraged by my curtain-foraging, I was off in search of more curtains, throws, cushion-covers . . . no luck at all in that respect.

I became an art-investor instead.

B. Williams - no trace online. Presumably an amateur, active 1980s & 90s. Two oil paintings.

I like the Lowry imitation a lot, though one black blob in the foreground is hard to explain.

The winter scene from Howarth is kitsch. Anyway, they are hanging in my kitschen now!

Williams1.jpg

Williams2.jpg

:p
 

Nosmo King

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I expected three charity shops to be open in Chadderton Precinct this afternoon; only one was.

Encouraged by my curtain-foraging, I was off in search of more curtains, throws, cushion-covers . . . no luck at all in that respect.

I became an art-investor instead.

B. Williams - no trace online. Presumably an amateur, active 1980s & 90s. Two oil paintings.

I like the Lowry imitation a lot, though one black blob in the foreground is hard to explain.

The winter scene from Howarth is kitsch. Anyway, they are hanging in my kitschen now!

View attachment 45673

View attachment 45674

:p
If it is the blob above the curved object on the right I think it's a wall section
 

Swifty

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I expected three charity shops to be open in Chadderton Precinct this afternoon; only one was.

Encouraged by my curtain-foraging, I was off in search of more curtains, throws, cushion-covers . . . no luck at all in that respect.

I became an art-investor instead.

B. Williams - no trace online. Presumably an amateur, active 1980s & 90s. Two oil paintings.

I like the Lowry imitation a lot, though one black blob in the foreground is hard to explain.

The winter scene from Howarth is kitsch. Anyway, they are hanging in my kitschen now!

View attachment 45673

View attachment 45674

:p
That Lowry like painting's good. I like that as well.
 
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