Chernobyl Aftermath

Anome

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#31
An Australian journalist (who works for 60 Minutes) was doing a report from the reactor complex. Apparently they were allowed to walk into the building with light protection and rad badges as long as they only stayed a couple of minutes.

Of course, I don't watch 60 Minutes and I'm not there anyway, so who knows what actually happened.
 

MaxMolyneux

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#32
Chernobyl 20 years later

I was only baby Max when this happened but what a disaster!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/4944898.stm

Some still live around there too since they can;t afford to leave! :shock:

Can anyone here remember the first odd news reports?

Last Updated: Wednesday, 26 April 2006, 19:35 GMT 20:35 UK
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Ukraine remembers Chernobyl blast

Candles lit at Chernobyl firefighters' memorial
Overnight vigils were held for those who died in the disaster

See the memorial
Ukraine has held a series of events to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster at the Chernobyl power plant.

President Viktor Yushchenko joined survivors and relatives of the dead at a ceremony outside the plant.

He met people who worked at the plant and presented medals to those who risked their lives making it safe.

The explosion spewed radioactive fallout over swathes of the then-USSR and many other parts of Europe.

Protests

In neighbouring Belarus, also badly affected by fallout, opposition groups held a rally in the capital Minsk to protest against government attempts to rehabilitate contaminated areas.

Nearly one quarter of the country was contaminated by radiation.

Before the rally, authorities sealed off the central October Square - the scene of clashes between opposition supporters and police after the disputed elections won by President Alexander Lukashenko in March.

Thousands of protestors - led by main opposition candidate, Alexander Milinkevich - were forced to gather in a nearby park instead.

The BBC's Emma Simpson in Minsk said opportunities in Belarus for demonstrations were few and protestors used the occasion to accuse authorities of lying about the effects of Chernobyl.

"Chernobyl didn't defeat us and neither will Lukashenko," one party leader said.

The anniversary of the disaster has traditionally been a day of protest for the opposition.

'Ask for forgiveness'

In Ukraine, vigils were held overnight in both the capital, Kiev, and in Slavutych, the town built to house the Chernobyl plant workers displaced by the accident.


LIVES INTERRUPTED
Map of the area around Chernobyl
Oh God, how they tricked us! They said they were taking us away for three days and they took us to the end of the earth
Hanna Semenenko

Chernobyl voices
Ukraine grieves
Send us your comments

In Kiev, hundreds of mourners, each carrying a single carnation and flickering candle, joined an outdoor Orthodox Christian service.

Mr Yushchenko laid a wreath to remember those who were sent to deal with the accident and to the many who have since been affected.

"After 20 years of pain and fear, this land must feel progress," he said.

"The trance we were left in by Chernobyl is over. We are a strong and brave people and we are looking to the future."

At 0123 (2223 GMT on Tuesday) - the precise time an alarm warning of the accident was set off on 26 April 1986 - the church bells tolled 20 times.

A similar ceremony got under way an hour earlier, to coincide with 0123 Moscow time, in Slavutych.

Mourners laid flowers and candles at a monument dedicated to those who died in the immediate aftermath of the accident.

"I knew all of these people," a tearful Mykola Ryabushkin told AFP news agency, pointing to the portraits hanging on the monument.

The 59-year-old had been working as an operator at the plant when the explosion happened.

"I look at them and I want to ask them for forgiveness," he said. "Maybe we're all to blame for letting this accident happen."

Disputed death toll

The accident happened at one of four reactors at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, 110km (70 miles) north of the capital, Kiev.


View of reactors three and four

In pictures: Day remembered
Region's press coverage
Belarus opposition hold rally

Throughout most of the following day the Soviet authorities refused to admit anything out of the ordinary had occurred.

It was only two weeks after the explosion, when radiation releases had tailed off, that the first Soviet official gave a frank account, speaking of the "possibility of a catastrophe".

Official UN figures predicted up to 9,000 Chernobyl-related cancer deaths. A Greenpeace report released last week estimated a figure of 93,000. Greenpeace said other illnesses could bring the toll up to 200,000.

A restricted area with a radius of 30km (19 miles) remains in force around the destroyed nuclear reactor, which is encased in concrete.
 

rynner2

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#33
Yes, I remember this incident very well.

A sad business, and a shock to all Europe.

I think certain areas of Wales are still not allowed to market spring lamb, as a result of the fall-out.
 
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#35
Tourists still going to Chernobyl. Fancy a trip?

Go Niche
SANDRA O'CONNELL

Sat, Feb 07, 2009

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/tra ... 24242.html

TWO THINGS have risen from the radioactive ashes of Chernobyl: wildlife and, even more amazingly, tourism. Each year travellers from around the world tour the region,

turning the world’s worst environmental disaster into the world’s most voyeuristic tourist attraction.

The power plant exploded on April 26th, 1986, causing a radioactive cloud to spread across Europe and the Soviet authorities to evacuate cities, towns and villages in the immediate area.

In all, a third of a million people were displaced. Many came from the city of Pripyat, built to house nuclear-plant workers; it’s now not unlike a modern-day Pompeii. A wander around yields up newspapers dating from the day of the explosion, art on school walls and toddlers’ shoes left in kindergarten.

Yet while in some ways the city is suspended forever in time, in others it is the signs of time passing that are most evident. In a triumph of nature over mankind, everywhere you look trees, bushes and weeds push through the walls of buildings, with a power that can reclaim even a 15-storey apartment block.

Equally, the vanished human population has been replaced by an even bigger animal one, including wolves, boar and deer, all of which would be safari-park lovely if it weren’t for the Geiger counter screaming on the dashboard.

A day tour of Chernobyl costs $310 (about €240) per person, based on two sharing, with the Ukrainian agency Solo East Travel.

www.soloeast.com
 
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#36
And 25 years later even the birds are more bird-brained.


Chernobyl birds are small brained
http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth_ne ... 387395.stm
By Matt Walker
Editor, Earth News

Marsh warbler (Image: Marek Szczepanek)
Marsh warblers are one of the species affected

Birds living around the site of the Chernobyl nuclear accident have 5% smaller brains, an effect directly linked to lingering background radiation.

The finding comes from a study of 550 birds belonging to 48 different species living in the region, published in the journal PLoS One.

Brain size was significantly smaller in yearlings compared to older birds.

Smaller brain sizes are thought to be linked to reduced cognitive ability.

The discovery was made by a team of researchers from Norway, France and the US led by Professor Timothy Mousseau from the University of South Carolina, US, and Dr Anders Moller from the University of Paris-Sud, France.

Harmful legacy

In April 1986, reactor number four at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded.

After the accident, traces of radioactive deposits were found in nearly every country in the northern hemisphere.

An exclusion has since been set up around the site of the accident.

However, scientists have been allowed inside to gauge the impact the radiation has had on the ecology of the region.

Last year Prof Moller and Prof published the results of the largest wildlife census of its kind conducted in Chernobyl - which revealed that mammals are declining in the exclusion zone surrounding the nuclear power plant.
Scientist collecting bacteria samples in Chernobyl
The scientists have studied the exclusion zone for more than a decade

Insect diversity has also fallen, and previously, the same researchers found a way to predict which species there are likely to be most severely damaged by radioactive contamination, by evaluating how often they renew parts of their DNA.

In their latest study, the scientists used mist nets to collect birds from eight woodland sites around Chernobyl, which have seen a decline in the numbers of larger animals and small invertebrates living within.

After controlling for the differences between species, they found that the birds had brains 5% smaller on average compared to birds not exposed to background radiation.

The effect was most pronounced in younger birds, particularly those less than a year old.

That suggests that many bird embryos did not survive at all, due the negative effects of their developing brain.

Mechanism unclear

Stressed birds are able to change the size of some of their organs in order to tough out difficult environmental conditions.

For example, migrating birds that have travelled long distances often shrink certain organs as they use up energy.

But the brain is the last organ to be sacrificed in this way, say the researchers.
Chernobyl forest
Chernobyl is largely human-free but still contaminated with radiation

That suggests the background radiation could be having an even more pronounced effect on other organs within the birds.

It is unclear exactly what mechanism is shrinking the birds' brains.

High levels of background radiation cause animals oxidative stress, where they have to use antioxidants in their bodies to fight its ill effects.

That leaves animals exposed to radiation severely depleted of antioxidants, and the reduced brain size may be a result of this depletion.

Alternatively, radiation could cause developmental errors in the way the brain grows.

However, if that were the case, the scientists say they would expect to see pronounced changes to the size and shape of other parts of the birds' bodies.

Another possibility is that the birds are developing less well as there is less invertebrate prey for them to eat.

But the scientists know of no example of the brains of a wild animal shrinking due to a lack of food.
 

Cavynaut

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#37
I got married on the same day as the Chernobyl disaster. The first reports began to come in on the Sunday, and I can still recall sitting with my wife in a pub in North Yorkshire on honeymoon listening to the news and wondering how it would affect us.
 

rynner2

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#38
rynner said:
I think certain areas of Wales are still not allowed to market spring lamb, as a result of the fall-out.
Not any more:

Post-Chernobyl disaster sheep controls lifted on last UK farms

Restrictions covering sheep movements after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster have finally been lifted from all farms in England and Wales after 26 years.

After the 1986 disaster, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) placed controls on 9,800 UK farms, but these were gradually removed.
The final eight in Cumbria and the last 327 in Wales are now free of them.

Adam Briggs, from the NFU, said it meant an end to the "sorry situation" of the Chernobyl legacy.
As a result of the explosion, radioactive particles became locked in upland peat and accumulated in grazing sheep.

Under the "mark and release" restrictions, the animals had to be tested for levels of Caesium-137 prior to being moved down from the fells for sales.
Farmers were paid £1.30 per animal, to compensate for the cost of holding them before monitoring.
The controls were lifted in Northern Ireland in 2000 and in Scotland in 2010.

Adam Briggs, policy advisor for the NFU in the North West, said: "I've spoken to a number of farmers in the area and they are all very happy with the decision.
"It gives them a bit of flexibility of when they can market the stock.
"The main thing is that research shows the meat is safe.
"People can now eat Cumbrian lamb with confidence."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-18299228
 
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#40
Have they got shiny noses?

Unexpectedly high levels of radioactivity have been found in Norway’s reindeer this autumn – almost 30 years after a radioactive cloud spread in the atmosphere of the country following the Chernobyl tragedy, say the country’s scientists.

In September, scientists from the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) marked a sudden record in radioactivity levels: up to 8,200 becquerels per kilo of Cesium-137, a radioactive element, were found in reindeer in Jotunheimen a mountainous area in central Norway.

The record “is extreme,” Lavrans Skuterud, a scientist at the NRPA, told science and research newspaper Forskning.

Skuterud compared the amount of the isotope this year with that of 2012, when the highest level of cesium in a similar probe among the local reindeer was 1,500 becquerels.

Not only deer were found to be highly radioactive, the researchers also found high amounts of cesium in the local sheep. Some 4,500 becquerels per kilo of meat from sheep was measured in Valdres district and the Gudbrandsdalen area in southeast Norway.

The limit for safe lamb/mutton consumption is only 600 becquerels. ...

http://rt.com/news/193512-norway-radioa ... chernobyl/
 
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#43
Becquerel Bears!

Brown bears return to Chernobyl after a century away

Scientists have captured what is believed to be the first photographic evidence of brown bears within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ).

Camera traps, used by a project assessing radioactive exposure impacts on wildlife, recorded the images. Brown bears had not been seen in the area for more than a century, although there had been signs of their presence.

The exclusion zone was set up after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine in April 1986.

"Our Ukrainian colleague, Sergey Gashchak, had several of his camera traps running in one of our central areas over the past few months in order to start to get a feel for what (wildlife) was there," explained project leader Mike Wood from the University of Salford. He told BBC News that data retrieved from one of the cameras in October contained images of a brown bear. ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30197341
 
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#44
A fire has broken out in woods near Ukraine's disused Chernobyl nuclear plant, the site of a meltdown in 1986.

Interior Minister Arsen Avakov said about 400 hectares of forest was alight in the exclusion zone around the plant

Up to 200 firefighters, along with scores of trucks and aircraft, were tackling the blaze about 15 to 20km (9 to 12 miles) from the nuclear plant.

Zoryan Shkiryak, head of Ukraine's emergency services, said later the fire had been brought under "full" control. ...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-32502393
 

FrKadash

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#46
The Famous Photo of Chernobyl's Most Dangerous Radioactive Material Was a Selfie
by David Goldenberg / 24 Jan 2016
In the days and weeks after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in late April 1986, simply being in the same room as this particular pile of radioactive material—known as the Elephant’s Foot—would have killed you within a couple of minutes. Even a decade later, when this image was taken, the radiation probably caused the film to develop strangely, creating the photo’s grainy quality. The man in this photo, Artur Korneyev, has likely visited this area more than anyone else, and in doing so has been exposed to more radiation than almost anyone in history.
 
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#47
Wildlife heaven or nuclear hell: Chernobyl’s future up for grabs

Thirty years after the world's worst nuclear disaster, the site is at a crossroads. Some want to turn it into a wildlife reserve, others a nuclear waste dump

A white-tailed eagle soars in the clear winter air. It is hunting for fish in one of the most radioactive bodies of open water on the planet: the 12-kilometre-long cooling pond whose waters doused the burning Chernobyl nuclear power station after it exploded 30 years ago.

The pond is radioactive – as are the fish. But they are also abundant. Wildlife is booming in the exclusion zonethat stretches for some 30 kilometres from the corroding plant.

Grey wolves, lynx, wild boar, rabbits, moose and the occasional brown bear roam the zone, says Denis Vishnevsky, an ecologist at the EcoCentre, which monitors the Ukrainian half of the exclusion zone.

Yet plans to turn the zone into a nature reserve are under threat from the nuclear industry, which wants to use the area to dispose of high-level radioactive waste. The future of the region may soon be settled as decisions are made ahead of the 30th anniversary of the world’s worst nuclear disaster, on 26 April.

Falling radioactivity
On one hand, things are improving. The region’s radioactivity levels are falling. In fact, 2016 marks the half-life of the two most dangerous isotopes released by the disaster that are still present in the landscape: caesium-137 and strontium-90.

That means just half the amount of these isotopes released remains in the environment, the rest having decayed. Each emits beta and gamma radiation as it decays, which can penetrate human tissue. ...

https://www.newscientist.com/articl...ernobyls-future-up-for-grabs/?utm_source=NSNS
 

Tigerhawk

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#48
Oh, yes, let's turn a radioactive zone into a dumping site for nuclear waste! That makes sense! I could rant about this for days on end, but it all boils down to one question - what is to be done with the site that makes it safe?
 

kamalktk

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#49
Chernobyl is getting a new steel containment dome

http://motherboard.vice.com/en_au/r...ide-a-new-giant-steel-dome?trk_source=popular
more and some video at the link
----------------------
"The New Safe Confinement, christened this week by Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, cost more than $1.5 billion dollars and should be effective at keeping a lid on the radiation for more than 100 years—well past the 2065 target date for a full clean-up of the site."
 

kamalktk

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#50
Ukraine has opened a hostel inside the containment zone. I bet it gets glowing reviews. :p

http://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/desti...chernobyl-the-most-radioactive-place-on-earth

Some more at link above
"The Ukrainian government has opened a hostel within the Chernobyl contamination zone, giving holidaymakers the chance to explore the epicentre of history's most devastating nuclear accident.

There are currently enough beds for 50 people in the former Soviet dormitory, located about 15 kilometres from the site of the 1986 reactor meltdown at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

"We plan an expansion to accommodate 102 people," administrator Svetlana Grishchenko said."
 

Tigerhawk

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#51
Ukraine has opened a hostel inside the containment zone. I bet it gets glowing reviews. :p

http://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/desti...chernobyl-the-most-radioactive-place-on-earth

Some more at link above
"The Ukrainian government has opened a hostel within the Chernobyl contamination zone, giving holidaymakers the chance to explore the epicentre of history's most devastating nuclear accident.

There are currently enough beds for 50 people in the former Soviet dormitory, located about 15 kilometres from the site of the 1986 reactor meltdown at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

"We plan an expansion to accommodate 102 people," administrator Svetlana Grishchenko said."
Hope the nearest hospital has room for 50 - 102 new patients!
 
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#52
Radioactive Boars!

A radioactive boar has been shot dead in Sweden.

The animal had ten times the safe limit of radiation because it lived in fields affected by the fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986. Sweden was covered in a toxic cloud after the nuclear reactor exploded at the Soviet Union power station. When it rained, radioactive iodine and cesium-137 fell on Gävle in the central-east causing radioactive pollution. In subsequent years the levels of radiation in elk and reindeer have decreased but wild boar have moved into areas worst affected by the nuclear fallout. ...


Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2017/10/06/radio...r-chernobyl-nuclear-rain-6981589/?ito=cbshare
 

maximus otter

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#53
The animal had ten times the safe limit of radiation...
Lit. trans.: “We now have meters capable of measuring radiation levels ten times more trivial.”

Lets have some context, please. We talk about “lethal radiation” and “toxic clouds”. What exactly are the increases in risk? Are we talking instant death? A statistical 1:500 chance of dying one year earlier than actuarial tables suggest we should? Is a Swedish pork casserole as dangerous as a radon-filled Cornish basement, for example?

We were told that the area around Pripyat would be teeming with sore-encrusted mutant horrors. News reports now suggest that it’s a wildlife paradise.

Give us nuanced reporting, actual numbers and some facts, please, not agenda-driven woo-woo propaganda.

maximus otter
 
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#54
Lit. trans.: “We now have meters capable of measuring radiation levels ten times more trivial.”

Lets have some context, please. We talk about “lethal radiation” and “toxic clouds”. What exactly are the increases in risk? Are we talking instant death? A statistical 1:500 chance of dying one year earlier than actuarial tables suggest we should? Is a Swedish pork casserole as dangerous as a radon-filled Cornish basement, for example?

We were told that the area around Pripyat would be teeming with sore-encrusted mutant horrors. News reports now suggest that it’s a wildlife paradise.

Give us nuanced reporting, actual numbers and some facts, please, not agenda-driven woo-woo propaganda.

maximus otter
Still though, bad enough being chased by a boar with normal levels of radioactivity but a radioactive one might be peeved at the bristles falling out.
 
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#57
It looks as if they do suffer ill effects:

At Chernobyl And Fukushima, Radioactivity Has Seriously Harmed Wildlife

The largest nuclear disaster in history occurred 30 years ago at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in what was then the Soviet Union. The meltdown, explosions and nuclear fire that burned for 10 days injected enormous quantities of radioactivity into the atmosphere and contaminated vast areas of Europe and Eurasia. The International Atomic Energy Agency estimates that Chernobyl released 400 times more radioactivity into the atmosphere than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945.

Radioactive cesium from Chernobyl can still be detected in some food products today. And in parts of central, eastern and northern Europe many animals, plants and mushrooms still contain so much radioactivity that they are unsafe for human consumption.

The first atomic bomb exploded at Alamogordo, New Mexico more than 70 years ago. Since then, more than 2,000 atomic bombs have been tested, injecting radioactive materials into the atmosphere. And over 200 small and large accidents have occurred at nuclear facilities. But experts and advocacy groups are still fiercely debating the health and environmental consequences of radioactivity.

However, in the past decade population biologists have made considerable progress in documenting how radioactivity affects plants, animals and microbes. My colleagues and I have analyzed these impacts at Chernobyl, Fukushima and naturally radioactive regions of the planet.

Our studies provide new fundamental insights about consequences of chronic, multigenerational exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation. Most importantly, we have found that individual organisms are injured by radiation in a variety of ways. The cumulative effects of these injuries result in lower population sizes and reduced biodiversity in high-radiation areas. ...

http://www.iflscience.com/plants-an...-radioactivity-has-seriously-harmed-wildlife/

No mention of baking but they may be inbred.
 
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RaM

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#58
I friend of mine went there taking aid to a orphanage, they were sat
on a wall one day and the Russians told them to come off as the top
of the wall was contaminated, after 3 visits he was told not to come back
as he had reached is dose limit, sadly he died of bladder cancer about
10 years later.
 
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RaM

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#60
Sad loss but he enjoyed himself, he rang me one day and out of the blue said
he was saying good by as he had been given 10 days to live, we live a distance
apart and I heard nothing so thought he had passed, about 2 years later I get
a phone call and it's him, after I had told him he was supposed to be dead and
it was dam inconsiderate of him not to be he invited us to his wedding, what a
good do it was to, last time I saw him was at a Hill clime and he was feeling
fine, it was only a year back when I saw another friend and he mentioned he
had passed than I knew he had gone.
 
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