Collective Disappearances (Settlements, Crews, Etc.)

Ali_Strachan

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#1
Did an entire Canadian village disappear in 1930?

Did an entire Canadian village disappear in 1930?

I wonder if anyone can verify whether the population of an Eskimo village by Lake Anjikuma disappeared without trace in November 1930? I orginally came
across the story in one of those cheap mysteries books which tend to sensationalise such mysteries. However, some research on the Internet did reveal a few sites with information on the supposed event. A trapper
called Joe Labelle stumbled upon the village & could not find a living soul. It has all the trappings of a classic "Marie Celeste"-type mystery with everything
left as if everyone had suddenly walked off, e.g. cooking pots burnt black. Even the dead were supposedly ripped from their burial ground. And to round it off a cigar-shaped UFO was seen beforehand & an eerie glowing light (not the Northern Lights) was seen by Mounties searching for the villagers. I have
grave doubts about this story as it does not appear to be more well-known.

Mike Palmer
 
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Anonymous

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#2
I think this is quite a well covered case, maybe still a mystery...
I think a note was left pinned to a tree stating "gone to Roanoke" (the name of a nearby island) but upon investigation there was still no trace of the settlement. I'll dig out some more info later...
 
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Anonymous

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#3
I recall a page or so going to it in "The world's Greatest UFO mysteries". Not much detail though :(
XCOM:)
 
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Anonymous

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#4
Tubal Cain said:
I think this is quite a well covered case, maybe still a mystery...
I think a note was left pinned to a tree stating "gone to Roanoke" (the name of a nearby island) but upon investigation there was still no trace of the settlement. I'll dig out some more info later...
Here is the famous story of the missing colony of Roanoke Island (and some theories)
http://www.millersv.edu/~columbus/papers/nixon-02.html
http://www.sciencedaily.com/print/1998/04/980428075409.htm

Sounds somewhat similar to the Canadian story, but it would seem harder for a settlement to "disappear" in the 1930s than the 1500s.

sureshot
 
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Anonymous

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#5
I 've heard of this..

Yes how appropriate for a Canadian forrest spirit to
answer this question...;) anyway..
I read a lot of items, books,etc..on the strange
and paranormal. I remeber this tale and it is
definately a seperate event than the late 16th
century disapperance of the Ronoake Colony.
IF THE 1930'S DISAPPEREANCE IS THE ONE I AM
THINKING OF I'M PRETTY SURE IT'S NOTHING MORE
THAN AN URBAN LEDGEND-IE..THE TOWN DISAPPEARED
FROM NATURAL CAUSES OR IT'S JUST A CAMP FIRE
STORY..SORRY TO DISAPPOINT YOU..L8ER:eek:
 
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Anonymous

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#6
Like I just posted over at my "redblotch" thread, The Encyclopedia Britannica has this to say about Roanoke Island. The island is located in Dare county, North Carolina (USA). Founded in 1584, it is the site of the first attempted English settlement in America. Virginia Dare was born there (Aug.18,1587) In Aug. 1590, when John White returned to the island, after going to England to get supplies, he found the settlement empty, the 15 men he had left to hold onto Engand's claim had disappeared, the only clues were the word "Croatan" written on one tree and the word "Cro" written on another tree. About the Canadian village disappearance, I have that story in a book, and when I find it I'll post it here. And like I posted on my redblotch thread, Roanoke, VA is a city in sw Virginia, the only thing in common with Roanoke Island is they similarly named. To do an AWFUL pun, "Yes Windagow, there is a Roanoke, Virginia!"
 
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Anonymous

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#7
I'm afraid that your first instinct about this story was probably the correct one. Best information suggests that it owes it's existence to a newspaper article that appeared in the Halifax Herald of 29 November 1930 under the sensational title "Tribe Lost in Barrens of North/ Village of Dead Found by Wandering Trapper, Joe Labelle." At the time the piece also ran in several other papers here in North America who were serviced by what I assume was a newswire called the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA). Written by "special correspondent" Emmett E. Kelleher of "The Pas, Manitoba" and datelined 28 November 1930, it has continued to surface on a regular basis in numerous books,magazine articles and websites ever since. The version that gained the most attention was probably it's appearance in Frank Edwards 'Stranger Than Science' (1959). The problem is that the whole story was actually laid to rest within a few months of it's original publication by a curious Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer named Sergeant J. Nelson who was stationed at the The Pas RCMP detachment at the time. Sgt. Nelson reported that although he had "made diligent enquiries from different sources" he could "find no foundations for this story." Despite interviewing individuals who resided in the area where the event allegedly occurred he was unable to locate a single person who was able to substantiate the claim. In fact Nelson reported that Joseph Labelle, the trapper who related the tale in the first place, was a "recent arrival" from the south to the region and had never been within several hundred kilometers of the site of the allegedly 'vanished' community. Even the illustration, a photograph, that accompanied the original article was dismissed by the officer after comparing negatives, when he discovered that it had actually been taken in 1909 by a The Pas resident named Patrick Rose. The original subject of Mr. Rose's photograph was a small Cree tent encampment located just outside The Pas at the time. Rose stated that Kelleher had borrowed the negative 'for his album' before the story came out, and "later returned it to his collection". Sgt. Nelson comments that Kelleher was known "for his habit of writing colourful stories of the North" and that "very little credence can be given to his articles." Nelson closed by reporting that Mr. Kelleher was "at present [....] visiting in the east, and should he return to The Pas [....] I will interview him regarding the above matter." It's not known if Kelleher ever came back. To my knowledge the most thorough debunking of the yarn is Dwight Whalens "Vanished Village Revisited" in Fate Magazine November 1976. It's entry in John Robert Colombo's "Mysterious Canada" is also worth a look as well.

Hope this helps

Terrance Gibson
 
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Anonymous

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#8
I forgot to mention that the "UFO"/"glow in the sky" or the "Roanoke note", do not appear in the original article by Kelleher.

t.
 
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Anonymous

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#9
I like Canada, yet sorry that i don't know anything about your story. As for the lost colony at Roanoake, by chance I saw a writer on tv talking about her new book on it. She was wired, truly into it. Her book is Roanoake:Solving the mystery of the Lost Colony". Lee Miller's argument is that it is one of the most hidden conspiracies in history, that it was the British Government who sabotaged the colonists, and came up with a Warren Commision-like explanation. She also, I believe, said that there were 115 people who disappeared.
 
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Anonymous

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#10
A version of the story appears in Whitley Streiber's 'Majestic', along with a few others of dubious providence. It definitely ain;t the Roanoake story though.
 

Breakfastologist

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#12
Towns as well?

Aren't there a few records of entire towns disappearing? Are any of these genuinely mysterious, or are they mostly quiet explicable?
 

harlequin2005

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#14
Didn't one of the Norfolk Regiments vanish in WW1?
No bodies found, no prisoners taken sort of thing...
8¬)
 

augustverango

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#15
The First-Fifth Battalion of the Royal Norfolk Regiment it was apparently. The bodies of only around half were found. There was a report of them being swallowed up by a cloud which sounds a bit dodgy (getting the name of the battalion and the date wrong).
 
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Anonymous

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#16
As for Roanoke, there are plenty of stories of 'white Indians' throughout that area. In my American History classes we discussed the colony, and we were taught that the colonists had probably joined up with some then unknown tribe. Propaganda? Hmmm...
 
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Anonymous

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#17
Stephen King talks about a number of towns that were found suddenly empty in the prelude to ''Salem's Lot'. The tone of it suggests that he was working from research when he wrote the descriptions, so who knows. I'll dig a copy out and have a look.
 
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swelle

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#18
I believe there were complete Medieval settlements that disappeared from Greenland... later Nordic visitors would appear and everyone was just gone, empty houses and livestock gone feral. But I can imagine how that might happen in Greenland, a pretty rough place to call home.
 
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Anonymous

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#20
Scrumpy Jack said:
I believe there were complete Medieval settlements that disappeared from Greenland... later Nordic visitors would appear and everyone was just gone, empty houses and livestock gone feral. But I can imagine how that might happen in Greenland, a pretty rough place to call home.
the whole greenland thing is a very depressing story - archaeologists found the graves and were confronted with a long history of malnutrition, gradually growing worse with each generation until they died out in the 14th c. the place was entirely reliant in iceland for everything, which was in turn probably three-quarters reliant on norway and denmark. after the 12th c. the climate worsened and no convoys could go for months at a time, iceland was taken over by norway and then denmark and its populace ruthlessly exploited, also by the new christian religion (from ad 1000) which seized vast tracts of land, taxed them heavily and instituted feudalism, having previously been trader-farmers who used the place as a base, and the volcanoes crackled back into life. there were also dark murmurings of the weakened norse greenlanders being massacred or at least severely prayed upon by the inuit (is that right?) natives. odd little forgotten corner of european history, but a real tragedy just the same. must have been horrible.
 

minordrag

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#21
Yes, the "Lost Colony" did pretty much vanish without a trace, although it must be remembered that they were left on their own for quite a stretch of time. And those pesky Injuns.
 
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Alatotep

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#22
I think there was a Roman Legion that vanished completely in Scotland - the 9th Legion? Probably massacred by locals, but it must have been a Custer's last stand situation.
 
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Anonymous

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#23
August Verango said:
The First-Fifth Battalion of the Royal Norfolk Regiment it was apparently. The bodies of only around half were found. There was a report of them being swallowed up by a cloud which sounds a bit dodgy (getting the name of the battalion and the date wrong).
That report was the basis of 'All the King's Men', which was quite good, but had them finding all the bodies, which I don't remember them doing. Mind you, a battalion is a lot of men to just vanish, but then a 425' freighter with a couple hundred tonnes of sulfur and 39 men on board shouldn't vanish, but it did.
Does anyone remember a story about an entire Inuit village that vanished in the 19th C., taking with them even their dead, but not their animals?
The 9th (Hispania) Legion? Yeah, we got 'em.
 
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Anonymous

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#24
people who just disappear

The Aboriginal people who live in QLD also have a legend of a pigmy sized people who were valued as arbiters of justice and good advice.Early white settlers sighted the tribe near the Jardine River,and then it disappeared.??
 

ogopogo3

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#25
Minor Drag said:
Yes, the "Lost Colony" did pretty much vanish without a trace, although it must be remembered that they were left on their own for quite a stretch of time. And those pesky Injuns.
Not to mention that the the word CROATOAN was carved on the trees. From this, one might deduce that the colonists moved to Croatoan Island, but hey, no one bothered to look for them there.

Years and years later, it was found that many of the Indians living there had strangely European features, such as blue eyes.
 

minordrag

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#26
Was there not a Croatoan tribe? Seem to dimly remember something about that.

Also, a good hoax about carvings in english found on a rock a few years ago.
 
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Anonymous

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#27
vanishing townsfolk?

Hi all,

I'm hoping someone can help me find information on this subject, although I'm afraid I don't have much to go on.

(I think) I remember reading some years ago about strange events surrounding the entire population of several towns just disappearing suddenly.
I'm sure this has happened more than once, although I am unable to recall where or when, just that I (may have) read it.

If I remember correctly ( and I may not be ), at least one of these happened in the US and was at least 100 years ago if not more. I also recall one explanation being that it was a mass suicide.....the town being near cliffs on the edge of the ocean.

I've been trying to find anything on his for the last two days, but due to my lack of info, all my searches come up blank.

Anyone have any ideas?

If I did dream this, I reserve the rights for the book and film :)

Thanks in advance, Dia
 
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Anonymous

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#29
aha

Thanks Ogopogo,
that does sound familiar. I almost stated in my original post that a date could be around 1600 too, but thought it may be wrong.

It certainly differs from what I remember in the explanations, but seeing as I can't remember clearly where I read it originally, that could well be it.

If anyone turns up anything different, I'd still be interested to know.
 
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Anonymous

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#30
im gona be vague to but it may give u a lead or two... Barbary Pirates use dto cruse the Channel/atlantic/irish sea... generaly looking for stuiff to knick and for Slaves... aparently Cornish fishermen were worth moenby in N.African markets cos of thier navigational skill etc... Some times they would raid small costal comunities and carry off the population... (or in one case the congrigation of St Marys church Penzance) Other times a fleet of smal fishing boats woudl be hijacked and so all the men froma village may disapear... This is reputed to have happened to the men of Port Isaac (or lost in storm dipending what book u read)... One Irish Village is said to have been totaly taken to Africa one night, i think that story may be authentic too, tho sorry i cant be more specific, but it may be worth looking into..
 
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