Confessions Of A Computer Game Addict

OneWingedBird

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#61
Not enjoying Wolfenstein:The New Order so far.

Too many controls, bonkers default key bindings, and 45 minutes in nothing's really happened and I can't work out how to get out of a hole in the ground.
 

Monstrosa

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#64
Bought a reconditioned old comp to play my old PC games. Already had a blast with Baldur's Gate and Planescape Torment.
 

Quake42

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#65
World of Warcraft addict since 2005.

Also a massive Civilisation fan.

TBH those games suck up so much time that there isn't really a chance to play much else...
 

Cultjunky

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#66
Same as Quake, only 10 years of Runecape. Have to say that back in the day I was very fond of Eco the Dolphin and some game whose name escapes me right now, where you were on a motorbike, and could swing a chain as you drove past other racers, it was on the megadrive, if anyone remembers?
 

Cultjunky

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#68
That's the one!

It also instilled in me a healthy distrust of motor bikes. TBH, it's more of a honest assessment of my own capabilities, lol.
 

Analogue Boy

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#69
Finished South Park The Stick of Truth.
I now need counselling for the issues raised in playing the game and rating it sickly excellent.
 

titch

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#70
I picked up "ghostmaster" for 49p from steam just before christmas, puzzle games are not normally my kind of thing but i am enjoying this one.
 

OneWingedBird

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#71
Getting a bit further now into Wolfenstein:The New Order. Was expecting the 'future' part of the game to happen due to some Austin Powers/Adam Adamant type premise... what we get there is pretty sad.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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#73
I did everything else I could possibly do before I started on the Warchiefs - things will get easier as you progress, I don't want to spoiler anything but I got to the point where I could take out a gang of them!

Get as much intel as possible....
 

CarlosTheDJ

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#74
I'm not going to paste the entire article in here as it's quite a long read, but this explains perfectly why Assassin's Creed II is such a fantastic game. Probably still my favourite of all time.

Full piece is here.

The Best Start To An Assassin's Creed Game



If I have one guilty pleasure series, it's Assassin's Creed. Normally, I'm not one to get excited about yearly releases, let alone broken games. But I've played and mostly enjoyed every game in the series. Recently, I returned to Assassin's Creed II, and, much to my surprise, I realized just how much I've lowered my standards since that game's 2009 release.

The first hour of Assassin's Creed II is a superb reminder of how great this series can be, providing a blueprint for future entries in the series. Let's take a look back at it to see just why that is.1

Assassin's Creed II's intro is tight, focused, and charming. Ezio Auditore became the series' face for years precisely because he was such a great protagonist. The game's first several missions are essentially a training sequence. It is an absurdly short one by series standards, clocking in at less than an hour of game time, but it elegantly conveys all the information the player needs to know. More importantly, however, Assassin's Creed II's first hour gives the player motive—a real reason to take action in the game beyond the massive, pointless collectathon that overshadows more recent titles.2

Over the past few installments, Assassin's Creed games have become bloated. What were short, hour-long training sequences are now drawn out into five or six hours of unmemorable sequences that often fail to adequately prepare the audience for the challenges ahead. The audience wants to have fun running around historic places and events, catching the sights and, occasionally, stopping bad guys. Ubisoft, it seems, hasn't quite figured that out.



Sure, the games are longer now, but not because they've become more substantial. Unity's map is littered with breadcrumbs that lead nowhere. Go to the gold chest to get a bit of money and possibly a new shirt, or the blue chest, or the red chest, or the brown chest. Sometimes you'll have to stop some guards. See that thing on the map? Well, if you've got the companion app on your phone, you can go touch it to add points there.3

It's fun, sure. Eating popcorn is fun. But afterplaying Assassin's Creed II again, I remember a time where I did things in Assassin's Creed because I wanted to, not because some map markers demanded action.I remember when the series felt more like a balanced meal than a bucket of popcorn.....

Read on here....
 

Analogue Boy

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#75
I'm now 60% through Tomb Raider. That'll be three games and it's not even February yet. I suppose I must be a games addict. I quite fancy Elite but i don't think I can bear the grind.
 

titch

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#76
i was toying with buying elite but i just don't have the time to play more then lotro
 

CarlosTheDJ

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#77
Beat Far Cry 4 In 15 Minutes By Doing Nothing

Ubisoft

The Moment: At the beginning of Ubisoft’s sandbox shooter, the player meets warlord antagonist Pagan Min and sits down to eat dinner with him.

When he has to disappear suddenly, the player is prompted to leave and start their adventure, but if you decide to sit still for 15 minutes, Min will come return and allow the player to spread his mother’s ashes as she requested, bringing the game to a quick close. It turns out even murderous warlords aren’t always so bad…

Why It’s WTF: Say what you want about Ubisoft, but it’s hilarious that they went to the effort to include something that would be glossed over by about 98% of the people playing this game. It’s an amusing easter egg and a bizarre send-up of the very nature of video games, how their wildly convoluted premises twist otherwise ordinary events into 12-hour action-fests.
 

OneWingedBird

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#78
Ah, good old Wolfy 3D...

Surprisingly playable, despite the intervening years.
I was rather surprised yesterday to find that there's a playable minigame of Wolfenstein 3D hidden in The New Order, there's a matress in the Kreisau Circle safe house where you can fall asleep and Wolfy 3D is your nightmare. :eek:
 

Analogue Boy

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#79
Beat Far Cry 4 In 15 Minutes By Doing Nothing

Ubisoft

The Moment: At the beginning of Ubisoft’s sandbox shooter, the player meets warlord antagonist Pagan Min and sits down to eat dinner with him.

When he has to disappear suddenly, the player is prompted to leave and start their adventure, but if you decide to sit still for 15 minutes, Min will come return and allow the player to spread his mother’s ashes as she requested, bringing the game to a quick close. It turns out even murderous warlords aren’t always so bad…

Why It’s WTF: Say what you want about Ubisoft, but it’s hilarious that they went to the effort to include something that would be glossed over by about 98% of the people playing this game. It’s an amusing easter egg and a bizarre send-up of the very nature of video games, how their wildly convoluted premises twist otherwise ordinary events into 12-hour action-fests.
Yep. At the endgame, he says 'if you'd just waited, we'd have gone and spirinkled your mother's ashes.' I'm going to restart and do this version now I've donerised this game.
 

Krepostnoi

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#80
I read an interesting critique of the ideological assumptions underpinning Elite : Dangerous today:
The original bought into the revamped ideals of British capitalism—of Thatcherism and her free-market meritocracy. Players ventured into the world with a few measly credits and a small, if not totally incapable, spaceship. To progress you’d need to work, re-investing what you made back into your ship (more cargo space etc).You’d need to put in hard, if not always honest, work in order to accumulate credits and make your way in the dog-eat-dog universe. Despite the thirty year gap, Dangerous continues on in this tradition, and is by no means alone in this—political conservatism is a mainstay of science fiction, and a whole videogame genre is based on the back of it. (Everything from Privateer to the recently released Starpoint Gemini begin by exporting capitalism to space.) In a recent interview Scottish science fiction writer Ken Macleod described this element as “the unimaginative projection of present-day societies into the far future and the not exactly hidden endorsement this gives to aspects of these societies.”
I've read similar criticisms of the Civilisation series: to win, you need to adopt a highly-industrialised "democratic" society that is very close to the idealised view of Western capitalism. The limited range of other government types simply cannot produce enough to meet the game's arbitrary targets, and there is simply no scope for exploring more esoteric philosophies of government.

It surprise me that, given the level of cultural importance computer games now have in our society (I'm assuming that this statement holds true for the vast majority of people reading this thread), there is not more games criticism (as opposed to reviews) - after all, we have it for film, TV, music, literature etc. Or am I just not reading the right publications?
 

Yithian

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#82
I had a long and slightly stressful week and just about managed to find the time to download my pre-order of Grim Fandango Remastered, install it, and watch the introduction on the day it was released. When I finally got the chance to sit down and play it last night, it was as if I'd purchased a time machine. The slight improvements that have been made to the graphics (lighting in particular) and music mean that it more closely resembles the idealised version that sat in my memory.

Observations:
It's a remaster and not a remake. The Monkey Island Special Editions redrew and re-recorded the whole thing. Here they've more or less left the backgrounds as they were, smartened up the characters and had a live orchestra redo the tunes - it doesn't look like a completely modern game, but the polygon-based caricatured style mean that it has aged well as it never aimed at photo-realism.

Adventure games have become easier in the intervening years, perhaps because the age of the target audience has dropped. I've watched younger relatives play through more modern things that look awesome but there's no real mystery about what to do or what it is possible to do. I've worked my way through the first year of Grim Fandango (which leaves me at the highlight of the game - the second year is Casablanca with skeletons - and although I could remember several solutions, a few left me scratching my head and going away to make coffee. I think the public's tolerance for getting stuck has gone down, but I find it so satisfying when it all clicks and a new area opens up. The difficulty brings its own pay-off. A few reviews have lamented the absence of an auto-hint function like the redone Monkey Island games, but this seems like overkill - there are hundreds of walkthroughs online if you're truly stuck.

The script is inspired. It's filled with quick puns, witty banter, smooth dialogue and subtle foreshadowing.

The music is the best I've ever heard in a game - it makes the setting:

Day of the Tentacle is next - hurrah!
Pray God for Full Throttle at some point.

Manny: Could I take your hole punch?
Eva: Ha! You could't even take my half-punch.


 
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#85
I've just found this on the foundfootagefest website, a montage of instructional vids from the late 80's to late 70's teaching us how to use the world wide web. Great fun and it takes me back :)

http://www.foundfootagefest.com/2013/09/computers/
Strange how the 90's seems somehow more remote than the 1970s or 80s. Perhaps you need to be the right age...

Nevertheless, loved seeing those clips - it could almost be an old Saturday Night Live skit lampooning low-quality infotainment of the era.

I've no idea if this was on the editor's mind, but I particularly enjoyed the wholesome all-American guy at 01:25 talking about sending an article 'to his nephew, or whatever'. It's obvious what was meant, but for some reason I imagine him turning up at a cheap motel with a young lad in tow: "I'd like a double room please...for myself and er, this here's my nephew, or whatever."

:oops:
 
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#86
I had a long and slightly stressful week and just about managed to find the time to download my pre-order of Grim Fandango Remastered, install it, and watch the introduction on the day it was released. When I finally got the chance to sit down and play it last night, it was as if I'd purchased a time machine. The slight improvements that have been made to the graphics (lighting in particular) and music mean that it more closely resembles the idealised version that sat in my memory.
Looks quite a bit slicker than the original, had it been a total remake, I might be tempted. I only got around to playing Grim Fandango a couple of years ago thanks to Oxfam and Dosbox. It's a beautiful game, and very funny but, being only a dabbler in gaming, I got badly stuck several times - especially near the end when I furtively resorted to hints and walkthroughs to get the bloody thing finished.

Brilliant fun though. I hope being dead proves to be every bit as entertaining.
 

FrKadash

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#87
Has anyone else tried the game Five Nights at Freddy's? I downloaded it a little while back and really enjoyed it, genuinely scary but quite subtle. I really recommend downloading it and giving it try.

 
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