Confessions Of A Computer Game Addict

MercuryCrest

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This looks very much like a playthrough I'm watching on Youtube for a game called "My Time At Portia". I'm not a fan of a lot of video game walkthroughs (mostly because of the people doing the talking), but Ladyshelab is a good Youtuber. In fact, Summer in Mara looks so similar (in places), I'd be surprised if she doesn't start a video series of that one too.

I'm on episode 43, but for the curious:

(And yes, there will be spoilers because it's a walkthrough, in case that wasn't clear to anyone; I'm never going to play the game myself, it's just relaxing watching someone else play it and comment.)
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Now that several copies of Red Dead Redemption 2 have appeared in my local CEX at a not unreasonable £25, I'm very tempted to treat myself.
Can anyone advise how much space it requires on Xbox One hard drive please? My 1st gen Xbox has a number of uncompleted games installed, which I do revisit occasionally and am loathe to delete. Think I have only 80gb or so free. Would that be enough for RDR2?
 

Megadeth1977

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Now that several copies of Red Dead Redemption 2 have appeared in my local CEX at a not unreasonable £25, I'm very tempted to treat myself.
Can anyone advise how much space it requires on Xbox One hard drive please? My 1st gen Xbox has a number of uncompleted games installed, which I do revisit occasionally and am loathe to delete. Think I have only 80gb or so free. Would that be enough for RDR2?
99gb on disk or 150gb digital download.
 

Megadeth1977

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Just a heads up we may in for stricter video game regulation no thanks to a troll on steam plus we no longer have the eu fundamental rights.im not sure if I should post a link about the game or not so I need help on how to run it by the mods.
 
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Frideswide

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Yithian

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Just a heads up we may in for stricter video game regulation no thanks to a troll on steam plus we no longer have the eu fundamental rights.im not sure if I should post a link about the game or not so I need help on how to run it by the mods.
You're all right to post the link, I think.

I scanned a couple of articles about a 'rape simulator' game being banned, but I don't want it to become party political.

We can certainly debate the rights and wrongs (and legal details) of censorship.
 

sherbetbizarre

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This new video game lets you do nothing in particular in a suburban Russian tower block
The game is what is called a “sandbox”: where the gamer is free to roam and alter a virtual world. The developer describes it as “post-Soviet and sad 3D” where “nothing awaits you: there is no chance to get out, no room for adventures, nor a breathtaking plot.” All you have to do is experience the precisely detailed, pixelated mundanity of the world around you.

https://www.calvertjournal.com/arti...-do-nothing-in-a-suburban-russian-tower-block
:hapdan:
 

CuriousIdent

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There's plenty of that in the Fallout games, but at least you can actually do stuff.
Exactly. I mean if you want to just wander around the land and discover places? You can. But there is a narrative going on. There are plot points, missions ad objectives.

Sandboxes are all well and good, but if there is no narrative driving you to play I tend to lose interest pretty quickly.
 

brownmane

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That's one of the reasons that I buy books.
But in keeping on topic, I'm waiting for "Days Gone" to come out. I'm currently playing GTA5. I got it for $20, so why not, though I don't really like having to find missions. Love stealing and driving the good cars...luckily I don't drive like that IRL:tank:
 

brownmane

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I love the Zelda franchise, but am trying not to get another game console. Already have ps3 & 4, 3ds, a PSP and a dead ps2. My preference is Sony, but Zelda is only Nintendo. Aagh
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Been thnking about all the 3D Maze/Dungeon Crawl games I've played over the decades, from Akalabeth on the Apple 2, Skull and the Bard's Tale on the Spectrum, Dungeon Master on the Amiga etc.
It's put me in the mood to try something similar on my Xbox One. Looking for an atmospheric, ideally 1st person RPG-style puzzler rather than a shooter, but above all with a genuinely claustrophobic feel of being trapped in a dungeon.
Any recommendations?
 

CuriousIdent

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-47634263
Google pushing streaming is bad for the consumer and the this is what the media industry wants because it's a good way of controlling access to content be it games movies or music and no Option to download with a subscription service and to kill off physical media.

Indeed. It's not good news. Spotify has properly fucked up the music industry by decimating physical and digital sales. Increasingly ownership of media appears to be considered a thing of the past. A successful streaming service for games could very easily do the same for gaming.

Google are effectively offering a connection to a supercomputer to stream play across the wires.

At the moment though there is one very clear bar. It needs a minimum download speed of 25mbps. Most of the UK doesn't have that. I mean the British Governments own fiber optic scheme was only aiming for 20mbps - and that is years behind schedule.

With a lesser connection the latency and and lag between you pressing buttons and the game responding could be pretty bad.
 
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CarlosTheDJ

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Playstation Now is a successful games streaming service already, I'm sure there's an Xbox equivalent.

The difference with the Google service is that you don't need to buy a new console every few years or constantly upgrade your computer to play the latest games.

If this takes off it will be the final nail in the coffin for the second-hand game market - great news for developers.
 

CuriousIdent

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Steam already exists.
A very different animal. Steam is a digital distribution channel. You could compare it to the Xbox/Windows Store or the PlayStation store. You pay to download a single copy of a game.

That's not what Stadia is. For one Stadia has no machine to download anything to. You aren't buying a product. You're subscribing to a virtual service. That's the model they appear to be talking about.

It's like replacing physical purchases of individual films or TV shows with a Netflix subscription. Or stopping buying music as CDs or digital files and subscribing to Spotify. You don't own anything you pay a single fee to rent access to a library.

Potentially pretty good for the customer, but very very bad for the developers.

Think swapping millions of individual sales for a token payment from google for supplying them with a game. The developer could lose out on hundreds of thousands of sales as people choose not to buy from them but subscribe cheaply from Google.

Potentially this is more damaging than Spotify has been for the music industry. At least the music industry still has live performances and touring as a revenue stream. The games industry doesn't have this.
 
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CuriousIdent

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Playstation Now is a successful games streaming service already, I'm sure there's an Xbox equivalent.
Successful might be stretching it a little. PlayStation Now's pricing per game rental is ridiculously high. That put a lot of people off the whole service.

The latency has also been criticised. The bottom line remains that you aren't playing on your deck with game streaming. You are playing on a machine on the other side of the world via your internet connection. There will always be a delay in button response throughout your experience. And you are held back by the speed of your connection.

The UK has bad average speeds for streaming. Much of the UK still has 10 mbps and below as a standard. Stadia requires a minimum of 25mbps.

But it is doubtless a direction the tech companies want to press in. Microsoft is working on a similar service (Project xCloud).


The difference with the Google service is that you don't need to buy a new console every few years or constantly upgrade your computer to play the latest games.
Exactly. It's a great proposition for the consumer.

But that said, if you want to actually own the game, or mod it, these are options which Stadia cannot supply you with. It would very much depend on what kind of experience you were looking for. If anything, streaming movies and music has proven people will accept some really poor quality product from streaming providing they get to see/hear something they're interested in. If that were to extend to 'Play'? Things could change fast.


If this takes off it will be the final nail in the coffin for the second-hand game market - great news for developers.
That nail was largely put in last generation if we're being realistic, I suppose. As digital sales started to rise. This gen the consoles don't even run the game off the disc you buy. You're purchasing an installer, not the game. And once it is installed it will need to be patched afterwards to run it.

The second hand market has taken a serious hit from this. But physical sales themselves have been significantly hit also. Increasingly people don't mind paying an extra £10-15 to add a game to their digital library. And all those older games can either be played on PC with a bit of patching or via backwards compatibility on an Xbox. Be that an Xbox 360 game or even a title from the original Xbox.

So I think we've been going that way for a long time now. And actually digital sales are by far the preferred option for developers. No manufacturing costs eating into their margins. It's the best option.

Which is in part why Stadia has a lot of developers a little concerned. Because Google appear to be talking about a subscription model. Like Spotify or Netflix. And that has the potential to do real damage to their business models.

If Stadia opts for individual rentals of games, then this could potentially work. Providing the developer gets a suitable cut. But in a subscription model you switch out hundreds of thousands of individual game sales for receiving a one-off fee from Google for supplying them with a game for their platform. Google then basically decided what that fee will be. If they became the market leader for this they could absolutely dictate that.
 
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Yithian

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After ten hours of copying hundreds of gigabytes to external harddrives and cloud-storage, I finally stumped up for CUPHEAD.

1) The game is a beautiful homage to 1930s U.S. animation.
2) You know that the designers have done something right when you've just died for the twenty-fifth time in a row, but there's a great big smile on your face.
3) And you 'fist pump' the air after beating every boss.

The experience is very much like having an arcade machine and a bucket of coins.
 

CuriousIdent

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After ten hours of copying hundreds of gigabytes to external harddrives and cloud-storage, I finally stumped up for CUPHEAD.

1) The game is a beautiful homage to 1930s U.S. animation.
2) You know that the designers have done something right when you've just died for the twenty-fifth time in a row, but there's a great big smile on your face.
3) And you 'fist pump' the air after beating every boss.

The experience is very much like having an arcade machine and a bucket of coins.

I was really impressed by Cuphead. It's hard as nails by post 2000 standards, yes. But those of us who grew up playing platformers in the the 80 and 90s will not see it as unfamiliar in terms of difficulty to those we played back then.

It's proper beautiful. Has that whole Fleischer Animation type vibe to it. And it does it so perfectly.
 
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