Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): The Disease & Its Spread (Per Se)

Lb8535

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"In a new article this week, they argue that the research into ivermectin has been plagued by widespread fraud and lax oversight by other researchers."

https://gizmodo.com/ivermectin-research-has-a-big-fraud-problem-scientists-1847730533

original paper:

The lesson of ivermectin: meta-analyses based on summary data alone are inherently unreliable​

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-021-01535-y
The Nature article is the perfect explanation of why no one can learn about anything data-driven from social media. You actually have to know what you're doing to reach an accurate conclusion.
 

Mythopoeika

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kamalktk

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Since Ivermectin isn't working so great, the gargling with iodine and inhaling hydrogen peroxide has begun.

https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-n...accine-groups-push-people-leave-icus-rcna2233

"But as the patients begin to realize that ivermectin by itself is not effective, the groups have begun recommending a series of increasingly hazardous at-home treatments, such as gargling with iodine, and nebulizing and inhaling hydrogen peroxide, calling it part of a “protocol.”"
 

Lord Lucan

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Since Ivermectin isn't working so great, the gargling with iodine and inhaling hydrogen peroxide has begun.

https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-n...accine-groups-push-people-leave-icus-rcna2233

"But as the patients begin to realize that ivermectin by itself is not effective, the groups have begun recommending a series of increasingly hazardous at-home treatments, such as gargling with iodine, and nebulizing and inhaling hydrogen peroxide, calling it part of a “protocol.”"

And so the thinning of the herd continues...
 

Lb8535

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Since Ivermectin isn't working so great, the gargling with iodine and inhaling hydrogen peroxide has begun.

https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-n...accine-groups-push-people-leave-icus-rcna2233

"But as the patients begin to realize that ivermectin by itself is not effective, the groups have begun recommending a series of increasingly hazardous at-home treatments, such as gargling with iodine, and nebulizing and inhaling hydrogen peroxide, calling it part of a “protocol.”"
Iodine, peroxide and bleach are all used as mouthwashes - and for all I know gargles - at particular strengths when recommended by doctors and dentists. Everywhere except the US, iodine gargles are sold over the counter and I would like to be able to lay hands on one. They are sold in Canada - so I'm guessing the legal strength is not nearly strong enough to kill covid viruses. Nebulizing any of them sounds like a poor idea.
 

Ringo

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The fourth wave is ending.
Norway is finally lifting almost all Corona restrictions, with the exception of air travel from abroad.

:cheer:
:beer:
Same here in Sweden. From the 29th of Sep all restrictions are lifted except for travel into Sweden from countries outside the EU. There are still some recommedations in place such as maintaining distance if possible etc but otherwise it's full speed ahead to the 5th wave.
 

Vardoger

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Same here in Sweden. From the 29th of Sep all restrictions are lifted except for travel into Sweden from countries outside the EU. There are still some recommedations in place such as maintaining distance if possible etc but otherwise it's full speed ahead to the 5th wave.
Afraid so, because now a lot of people will lose their inhibitions. They're expecting an increase in Covid-19 again in Norway after this weekend. Night clubs, restaurants, cinemas, theatres and discotheques opened up again on Saturday with no distancing and mask mandates.

90% of the adult population has gotten the first jab, while 80% has gotten the second jab. They're now giving it to the 12-15 year olds.
 
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marhawkman

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Well this is interesting.

Antivirals are already essential treatments for other viral infections, including hepatitis C and HIV. One of the best known is Tamiflu, the widely prescribed pill that can shorten the duration of influenza and reduce the risk of hospitalization if given quickly.

The medications, developed to treat and prevent viral infections in people and animals, work differently depending on the type. But they can be engineered to boost the immune system to fight infection, block receptors so viruses can't enter healthy cells, or lower the amount of active virus in the body.

At least three promising antivirals for covid are being tested in clinical trials, with results expected as soon as late fall or winter, said Carl Dieffenbach, director of the Division of AIDS at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who is overseeing antiviral development.

"I think that we will have answers as to what these pills are capable of within the next several months," Dieffenbach said.

Covid-19 vaccine boosters can begin for some US adults as CDC partially diverges from its advisers' recommendations

The top contender is a medication from Merck & Co. and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics called molnupiravir, Dieffenbach said. This is the product being tested in the Kellys' Seattle trial. Two others include a candidate from Pfizer, known as PF-07321332, and AT-527, an antiviral produced by Roche and Atea Pharmaceuticals.

They work by interfering with the virus's ability to replicate in human cells. In the case of molnupiravir, the enzyme that copies the viral genetic material is forced to make so many mistakes that the virus can't reproduce. That, in turn, reduces the patient's viral load, shortening infection time and preventing the kind of dangerous immune response that can cause serious illness or death.

So far, only one antiviral drug, remdesivir, has been approved to treat covid. But it is given intravenously to patients ill enough to be hospitalized, and is not intended for early, widespread use. By contrast, the top contenders under study can be packaged as pills.

Sheahan, who also performed preclinical work on remdesivir, led an early study in mice that showed that molnupiravir could prevent early disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes covid. The formula was discovered at Emory University and later acquired by Ridgeback and Merck.

Clinical trials have followed, including an early trial of 202 participants last spring that showed that molnupiravir rapidly reduced the levels of infectious virus. Merck chief executive Robert Davis said this month that the company expects data from its larger phase 3 trials in the coming weeks, with the potential to seek emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration "before year-end."

Pfizer launched a combined phase 2 and 3 trial of its product Sept. 1, and Atea officials said they expect results from phase 2 and phase 3 trials later this year.

If the results are positive and emergency use is granted for any product, Dieffenbach said, "distribution could begin quickly."

That would mean millions of Americans soon could have access to a daily orally administered medication, ideally a single pill, that could be taken for five to 10 days at the first confirmation of covid infection.


Full Article:
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/09/27/health/covid-treatment-pill-khn-partner/index.html

Better antiviral agents soon to come?
 

EnolaGaia

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Having had a COVID-19 infection does not guarantee any particular level of immune response, much less any particular degree of ongoing immunity to further infection.
Experts: COVID-19 infection offers less protection than many think

It seems like common sense for people who've had COVID-19 to think they now have natural immunity, and therefore don't have to bother getting vaccinated.

Common sense, yes, but also incorrect, infectious disease doctors say. ...

Your case of COVID-19 -- especially if it was very mild -- probably didn't create enough of an immune response to provide lasting protection against the coronavirus, said Dr. Buddy Creech, president-elect of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. ...

"Not all infections are created equal," said Creech, director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program in Nashville, Tenn. "We have over a year's worth of data now that clearly show us the more mild the infection is, the less high and then the less durable the immune response to coronavirus is going to be."

He speaks from personal experience. COVID-19 swept through his family of five in March 2020, near the start of the pandemic. ...

Blood tests showed that his daughter, who had symptoms for only a day, developed COVID-19 antibody levels around 700, Creech said. ...

His wife had flu-like symptoms for a week and lost her sense of taste and smell, and produced antibody levels around 7,000.

For his part, Creech came down with a nasty 16-day infection that included a case of pneumonia and wound up with antibody levels around 50,000. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.upi.com/Health_News/202...ess-protection-than-many-think/8181632776656/
 

EnolaGaia

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A newly reported survey study - currently awaiting peer review - indicates COVID-19 infections thin the grey matter in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain and negatively affect cognitive task performance - regardless of the infection's severity.
Even Mild COVID-19 Can Affect The Brain, And We Don't Know How Long It Lasts

With more than 18 months of the pandemic in the rearview mirror, researchers have been steadily gathering new and important insights into the effects of COVID-19 on the body and brain. These findings are raising concerns about the long-term impacts that the coronavirus might have on biological processes such as aging. ...

But as more evidence came in showing that COVID-19 could affect the body and brain for months or longer following infection, my research team became interested in exploring how it might also impact the natural process of aging. ...

In August 2021, a preliminary but large-scale study investigating brain changes in people who had experienced COVID-19 drew a great deal of attention within the neuroscience community.

In that study, researchers relied on an existing database called the UK Biobank, which contains brain imaging data from over 45,000 people in the UK going back to 2014. This means – crucially – that there was baseline data and brain imaging of all of those people from before the pandemic.

The research team analyzed the brain imaging data and then brought back those who had been diagnosed with COVID-19 for additional brain scans. They compared people who had experienced COVID-19 to participants who had not, carefully matching the groups based on age, sex, baseline test date and study location, as well as common risk factors for disease, such as health variables and socioeconomic status.

The team found marked differences in gray matter – which is made up of the cell bodies of neurons that process information in the brain – between those who had been infected with COVID-19 and those who had not.

Specifically, the thickness of the gray matter tissue in brain regions known as the frontal and temporal lobes was reduced in the COVID-19 group, differing from the typical patterns seen in the group that hadn't experienced COVID-19. ...

Interestingly, when the researchers separated the individuals who had severe enough illness to require hospitalization, the results were the same as for those who had experienced milder COVID-19. That is, people who had been infected with COVID-19 showed a loss of brain volume even when the disease was not severe enough to require hospitalization.

Finally, researchers also investigated changes in performance on cognitive tasks and found that those who had contracted COVID-19 were slower in processing information, relative to those who had not.

While we have to be careful interpreting these findings as they await formal peer review, the large sample, pre- and post-illness data in the same people and careful matching with people who had not had COVID-19 have made this preliminary work particularly valuable. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/even-m...the-brain-and-we-don-t-know-how-long-it-lasts
 

Nosmo King

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Scientists are trailing a vitamin A nasal drop to try and combat loss of smell due to covid.

"Vitamin A nasal drops might be able to treat the loss or altered sense of smell in some people who have had Covid, UK researchers say.

The University of East Anglia is conducting a 12-week trial.

Only some of the volunteer patients will receive the treatment but all will be asked to sniff powerful odours such as rotten eggs and roses.

And brain scans will check if the vitamin has repaired injured olfactory pathways or "smell nerves"."

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-58705938
 

kamalktk

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Scientists may have figured out some previously reported links with Covid and diabetes. The Covid infection is apparently changing what the pancreatic cells that normally produce insulin produce.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/me...ed-person-s-spouse/ar-AAOYbKR?ocid=entnewsntp

----------------------------
(Reuters) - The following is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19. They include research that warrants further study to corroborate the findings and that have yet to be certified by peer review.

Coronavirus transforms pancreas cell function

When the coronavirus infects cells, it not only impairs their activity but can also change their function, new findings suggest. For example, when insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas become infected with the virus, they not only produce much less insulin than usual, but also start to produce glucose and digestive enzymes, which is not their job, researchers found. "We call this a change of cell fate," said study leader Dr. Shuibing Chen, who described the work in a presentation on Tuesday at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, held virtually this year. It is not clear whether the changes are long-lasting, or if they might be reversible, the researchers noted earlier in a report published in Cell Metabolism. Chen noted that some COVID-19 survivors have developed diabetes shortly after infection. "It is definitely worth investigating the rate of new-onset diabetes patients in this COVID-19 pandemic," she said in a statement. Her team has been experimenting with the coronavirus in clusters of cells engineered to create mini-organs, or organoids, that resemble the lungs, liver, intestines, heart and nervous system. Their findings suggest loss of cell fate/function may be happening in lung tissues as well, Chen, from Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, told Reuters.
 

Victory

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From The Daily Telegraph

Covid was spreading "virulently" in Wuhan as early as summer 2019.

The study by Internet 2.0, a cyber security consultancy that specialises in examining data from China, says: "We have come to the conclusion it suggests the virus was highly likely to be spreading virulently in Wuhan, China, as early as the summer of 2019 and definitely by the autumn."

The analysts at Internet 2.0 carried out a "robust and exhaustive assessment" of hundreds of procurement contracts for PCR equipment found on open-sourced databases throughout the province between 2007 and 2019.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/world-n...g-virulently-wuhan-summer-2019-claims-report/
 

Ghost In The Machine

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Afraid so, because now a lot of people will lose their inhibitions. They're expecting an increase in Covid-19 again in Norway after this weekend. Night clubs, restaurants, cinemas, theatres and discotheques opened up again on Saturday with no distancing and mask mandates.

90% of the adult population has gotten the first jab, while 80% has gotten the second jab. They're now giving it to the 12-15 year olds.
My 19 year old was in Portugal last week (Liverpool game) and him and his mates were very struck by the fact everyone wears a mask everywhere, even outdoors. In the UK you largely only see people wearing masks in shops and the number of people wearing em at all seems to drop all the time. He said, once or twice him and his mates forgot to put masks on outside and instantly got evils. Which was fair enough.

Son checked the figures, out of curiosity. He says in Portugal, the new cases are a few hundred a week. Here? 36,000. (yes, that's three noughts) a DAY. Masks work. Masks should be mandatory. There should be no need at this point for any conversation about this or any libertarian dogma getting in the way of the medical facts.

We're being enculturated to accept the narrative that we have to "live with it" and expect tens of thousands of new cases daily. Other countries - EU, at least - seem to be more intelligent and pragmatic.
 

Vardoger

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My 19 year old was in Portugal last week (Liverpool game) and him and his mates were very struck by the fact everyone wears a mask everywhere, even outdoors. In the UK you largely only see people wearing masks in shops and the number of people wearing em at all seems to drop all the time. He said, once or twice him and his mates forgot to put masks on outside and instantly got evils. Which was fair enough.

Son checked the figures, out of curiosity. He says in Portugal, the new cases are a few hundred a week. Here? 36,000. (yes, that's three noughts) a DAY. Masks work. Masks should be mandatory. There should be no need at this point for any conversation about this or any libertarian dogma getting in the way of the medical facts.

We're being enculturated to accept the narrative that we have to "live with it" and expect tens of thousands of new cases daily. Other countries - EU, at least - seem to be more intelligent and pragmatic.
I can report that the numbers of cases in Norway has not increased, but continue to decrease, despite the opening. So it has been a success. Hospitalized numbers has also decreased slowly. People was asked during the pandemic to wear masks on public transport and in stores. After the opening very few wear masks at all. People still use sanitizers in stores.

We have also been told to live with it like a flu, and may have to take a new shot every year.
I've read somewhere they're working on a combined flu/corona vaccine.

Cases.
1633432644716.png

Hospitalized.
1633433015810.png


Weekly deaths.
1633435702516.png
 
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catseye

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When the restrictions were first lifted, I'd say around 70% of the customers in my supermarket were still wearing masks. Now it's more like 25% and there's still a huge number of those whose wearing of the mask is completely pointless. This is especially noticeable in the elderly, who seem to wear masks that are so baggy around the face that they gape around the nose. I've no idea why the most vulnerable are being told to mask up but nobody seems to check that they've got the vaguest idea of HOW to wear a mask.
 

Vardoger

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When the restrictions were first lifted, I'd say around 70% of the customers in my supermarket were still wearing masks. Now it's more like 25% and there's still a huge number of those whose wearing of the mask is completely pointless. This is especially noticeable in the elderly, who seem to wear masks that are so baggy around the face that they gape around the nose. I've no idea why the most vulnerable are being told to mask up but nobody seems to check that they've got the vaguest idea of HOW to wear a mask.
And then you got those who wear masks below their nose, like their noses are protected by the jungly nose hairs or something. :dunno:
 

catseye

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And then you got those who wear masks below their nose, like their noses are protected by the jungly nose hairs or something. :dunno:
That's pretty much how many of my older customers wear them. So baggy that they hang underneath the nose. I have absolutely no idea what they think when they put them on like this. Do they think it's just 'wearing' the mask that protects them? Why do they think other people wear them (correctly) covering nose and mouth? Is anyone the possessor of one of these, who can ask?
 

marhawkman

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That's pretty much how many of my older customers wear them. So baggy that they hang underneath the nose. I have absolutely no idea what they think when they put them on like this. Do they think it's just 'wearing' the mask that protects them? Why do they think other people wear them (correctly) covering nose and mouth? Is anyone the possessor of one of these, who can ask?
Yeah it's one of those blind leading the blind things. A system where wearing a mask is required but wearing a mask that actually WORKS isn't? lol wut?

Most of the masks people wear don't even filter viruses out of the air when worn right. Sure... "better than nothing" but that's not saying a lot.

This is one of those things that got mentioned early on, and later nearly dropped entirely... Originally the CDC had a set of rules for what kind of mask to wear, then seemingly dropped the matter when they realized that style was too expensive to mass-implement(since you would need to produce enough to consume them at a rate of almost 1 billion per day, in the US alone).
 

catseye

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But at least with 'masks' correctly worn, even if the actual mask itself may be largely useless, at least you can convince yourself that your mouth and nose are covered. Should you sneeze or cough, the worst of the result is contained. But WHAT do these people think is being achieved by having a bit of fabric draped loosely under your nose and only barely covering your mouth? What is the reasoning behind it? What, exactly, do they think they are doing? Does anyone know, because I would be fascinated to hear their reasons.
 

EnolaGaia

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I hate to play on a stereotype, but ... If ever there was a piece of medical advice that was destined to fall on deaf ears ...
Russians warned to avoid alcohol after receiving coronavirus vaccine

Health officials are warning anyone who receives Russia's Sputnik V coronavirus vaccine to stop drinking alcohol for two months over fears it could compromise its effectiveness.

Head of Russia's consumer health watchdog, Anna Popova told the Komsomolskaya Pravda radio station that alcohol could reduce the body's ability to build up immunity to the coronavirus.

"It's a strain on the body. If we want to be healthy and have a strong immune response, don't drink alcohol," she said on Tuesday. ...

Locals are calling the advice unreasonable and even the vaccine developer, Alexander Gintsburg, has said there is no need to completely abstain from alcohol. ...

He agreed reducing your alcohol intake would help the body build a defence to the virus, but said that advice applies to any coronavirus vaccine, not just Russia's Sputnik V.

According to Ms Popova, those who receive the Sputnik V vaccine should completely avoid alcohol for two weeks before the first jab and 42 days after it had been given. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.9news.com.au/health/spu...-alcohol/5275dffd-9bda-492c-a45d-73071dea493e
 

GNC

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Yeah it's one of those blind leading the blind things. A system where wearing a mask is required but wearing a mask that actually WORKS isn't? lol wut?

Most of the masks people wear don't even filter viruses out of the air when worn right. Sure... "better than nothing" but that's not saying a lot.

This is one of those things that got mentioned early on, and later nearly dropped entirely... Originally the CDC had a set of rules for what kind of mask to wear, then seemingly dropped the matter when they realized that style was too expensive to mass-implement(since you would need to produce enough to consume them at a rate of almost 1 billion per day, in the US alone).

A quick Google reveals many reasons why wearing masks is effective against Covid-19, including increasing the humidity of the air in your lungs, which apparently helps a lot. See here (for lots of pesky facts):
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/why-might-face-masks-reduce-covid-19-severity
 
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