COVID-19: How Are You? (Your Personal Notes; Queries; Reports)

Naughty_Felid

kneesy earsy nosey
Joined
Mar 11, 2008
Messages
8,363
Reaction score
11,027
Points
294
Well, I'm pretty much OK now, except body temperature control still up the creek - going from shivering to sweating and back again. Last 24 hours up to this morning very unpleasant. Medium severe flu symptoms and shortness of breath coupled with migraine style headache and random physical pain. For a few hours my chest was hurting so much I was debating whether to call 999 in case my heart was about to give out.

Obviously not everyone will get the same side effects, but I can see why in some countries there is worry about giving the AZ to the old and frail - what i have experienced could finish a very weak person off. Equally obviously so could Covid-19 - a very difficult judgement call.
ffs get checked out you muppet - you really make me angry.
 

Cochise

Priest of the cult of the Dog with the Broken Paw
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
6,573
Reaction score
8,814
Points
284
ffs get checked out you muppet - you really make me angry.
I don't know what you are talking about. These are only the side effects they talk about in the paperwork. If they had persisted for four days - as it says in the paperwork - I would have contacted my GP. No point in getting hysterical.

True, I did consider calling in because of the chest pains - but since I'd had unexplained pains elsewhere during the previous 18 hours or so I decided on balance it wasn't justified.
 
Last edited:

blessmycottonsocks

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Messages
5,458
Reaction score
9,191
Points
284
Location
Wessex and Mercia
Well, I'm pretty much OK now, except body temperature control still up the creek - going from shivering to sweating and back again. Last 24 hours up to this morning very unpleasant. Medium severe flu symptoms and shortness of breath coupled with migraine style headache and random physical pain. For a few hours my chest was hurting so much I was debating whether to call 999 in case my heart was about to give out.

Obviously not everyone will get the same side effects, but I can see why in some countries there is worry about giving the AZ to the old and frail - what i have experienced could finish a very weak person off. Equally obviously so could Covid-19 - a very difficult judgement call.
That does sound like very bad luck.
My elderly aunt (just turned 80) had the jab recently and noticed no side effects at all.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
30,075
Reaction score
43,942
Points
284
I don't know what you are talking about. These are only the side effects they talk about in the paperwork. If they had persisted for four days - as it says in the paperwork - I would have contacted my GP. No point in getting hysterical.

True, I did consider calling in because of the chest pains - but since I'd had unexplained pains elsewhere during the previous 18 hours or so I decided on balance it wasn't justified.
He's shouted at me before as well .. take it as a compliment, it's only because he likes you :) .. consider his advice.
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
2,343
Reaction score
7,553
Points
219
Location
York
I think it must be regional. My daughter (30, some underlying health conditions and ADD) has been scheduled for her jab next week.

I, (60, asthmatic but not badly enough to count as vulnerable, and working throughout in a supermarket) am still waiting for anyone to say anything other than 'yeah, possibly some time in March. Or maybe April. Dunno.'
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
43,320
Reaction score
34,431
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
I spoke with my doctor's surgery about some unrelated matter this morning (to arrange a medical review and a diabetic blood test) and I mentioned about the vaccine. They basically said that it's nothing to do with them and they just suggested that I wait to be contacted.
Odd that a guy at work who is only 33 and looks otherwise fit has had his jab and I (decrepit, overweight, diabetic, high blood pressure, almost 60) haven't.
Maybe it's to do with alphabetic order of names and because of living in different areas? He lives in North London, I live in central Beds.
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
2,343
Reaction score
7,553
Points
219
Location
York
I spoke with my doctor's surgery about some unrelated matter this morning (to arrange a medical review and a diabetic blood test) and I mentioned about the vaccine. They basically said that it's nothing to do with them and they just suggested that I wait to be contacted.
Odd that a guy at work who is only 33 and looks otherwise fit has had his jab and I (decrepit, overweight, diabetic, high blood pressure, almost 60) haven't.
Maybe it's to do with alphabetic order of names and because of living in different areas? He lives in North London, I live in central Beds.
He may have a condition you can't see. My daughter looks fit and well but isn't.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
30,075
Reaction score
43,942
Points
284
I think it must be regional. My daughter (30, some underlying health conditions and ADD) has been scheduled for her jab next week.

I, (60, asthmatic but not badly enough to count as vulnerable, and working throughout in a supermarket) am still waiting for anyone to say anything other than 'yeah, possibly some time in March. Or maybe April. Dunno.'
Fucking supermarkets .. staff might as well be disposable light bulbs.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
43,320
Reaction score
34,431
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
He may have a condition you can't see. My daughter looks fit and well but isn't.
Yeah, maybe. He isn't a dwarf, but he is very slight and is quite short. Could be something that affected him in childhood to stunt his growth.
Other than that, he can run faster than me without getting out of breath.
 

Cochise

Priest of the cult of the Dog with the Broken Paw
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
6,573
Reaction score
8,814
Points
284
That does sound like very bad luck.
My elderly aunt (just turned 80) had the jab recently and noticed no side effects at all.
I've never had side effects from any vaccine before other than a sore arm. I'm not by any means trying to scare people, In fact just the opposite - the side effects I've experienced were unpleasant but not unpredicted - that they coincided with what I was warned about was reassuring rather than worrying. The extent of the aches and pains was surprising, but its possible my pain tolerance is not what it was a couple of years ago.

I think it must be regional. My daughter (30, some underlying health conditions and ADD) has been scheduled for her jab next week.

I, (60, asthmatic but not badly enough to count as vulnerable, and working throughout in a supermarket) am still waiting for anyone to say anything other than 'yeah, possibly some time in March. Or maybe April. Dunno.'
spoke with my doctor's surgery about some unrelated matter this morning (to arrange a medical review and a diabetic blood test) and I mentioned about the vaccine. They basically said that it's nothing to do with them and they just suggested that I wait to be contacted.
Odd that a guy at work who is only 33 and looks otherwise fit has had his jab and I (decrepit, overweight, diabetic, high blood pressure, almost 60) haven't.
Maybe it's to do with alphabetic order of names and because of living in different areas? He lives in North London, I live in central Beds.
There are obviously variations, and of course I'm in Wales. But here the GP's are very much involved in administering the jabs, and seem quite pro-active in calling people. It seems to me only sensible that the jabs should be administered through your own doctor, but presumably there are difficulties with that in some areas.
 
Last edited:

bugmum

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Sep 10, 2003
Messages
539
Reaction score
1,475
Points
164
I'm beginning to feel as if the situation has slowed me down.

I'm lucky, I've not had Covid - despite an In House GP, and the fact that the Junior Medic was on the Infection Control ward for the first 6 months of last year, and because he is a single person living on his own we are his support bubble - which is probably helped by living in Exeter, where rates have not been as high as elsewhere. It's not so easy to carry out scientific research at home, so when we were basically banned from campus in March, I spent two months desperately rooting around for things to do (got my latest protocol published in the end) before they finally decided to furlough us in May. At that point, I had the Teenager off school, although I didn't need to be involved in home schooling as she has her own laptop and is pretty conscientious about doing work, and Son No 2 was on a leave of absence from Uni, though incredibly hacked off that he couldn't (a) go to the gym and (b) earn some dosh over at Sandy Park stadium. I was doing fine - took up morning yoga, found some home workouts that I liked on YouTube, went walking with the Teenager, made bread, read books.

Then in September I was allowed back to work - I'm currently 0.6FTE anyway - and whilst my boss didn't have any pertinent suggestions as to what I was doing, I found things to occupy in the time that I could book in the lab. The Teenager went back to school - although she ended up self-isolating twice - and Son No 2 went back to Uni. Things felt a bit more normal. I was still doing fine.

Come lockdown number 3, and I suddenly feel as if I'm stagnating. My yoga and exercise motivation has crumbled. I'm still allowed to go into work, but walking between the car park and the building , I find my knees are aching, and climbing the multitude of stairs to our penthouse lab whilst wearing a face mask is an exercise in torture. My ability to nod off is scary - I'm not quite 50, but five minutes in front of a scientific paper online and I'm fighting my eyelids. Walking with the Teenager, I find that she is outpacing me on upward slopes. It's like being in a permanent state of lethargy, and not helped by the feeling that I need to remain bright and positive because the In House GP is brought low by January and February, his least favourite months.

Anyway, I'm sorry. I have a roof over my head, enough to eat, I haven't lost anybody to this grim disease, so I have much to be thankful for. I just can't help feeling as though I've lost a piece of me over the last year and I don't know where it's gone!
 

Kondoru

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Messages
7,275
Reaction score
2,164
Points
234
Yow.

I had an iffy night.

I didn't sleep well, needed the toilet four times (instead of my normal once) and though I was sweating; when I pushed the duvet off it was icy cold so I pulled it back on quick.

Im fine today but a little tired. Maybe it was the jab, or maybe just a mild bug I picked up.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
30,075
Reaction score
43,942
Points
284
I'm beginning to feel as if the situation has slowed me down.

I'm lucky, I've not had Covid - despite an In House GP, and the fact that the Junior Medic was on the Infection Control ward for the first 6 months of last year, and because he is a single person living on his own we are his support bubble - which is probably helped by living in Exeter, where rates have not been as high as elsewhere. It's not so easy to carry out scientific research at home, so when we were basically banned from campus in March, I spent two months desperately rooting around for things to do (got my latest protocol published in the end) before they finally decided to furlough us in May. At that point, I had the Teenager off school, although I didn't need to be involved in home schooling as she has her own laptop and is pretty conscientious about doing work, and Son No 2 was on a leave of absence from Uni, though incredibly hacked off that he couldn't (a) go to the gym and (b) earn some dosh over at Sandy Park stadium. I was doing fine - took up morning yoga, found some home workouts that I liked on YouTube, went walking with the Teenager, made bread, read books.

Then in September I was allowed back to work - I'm currently 0.6FTE anyway - and whilst my boss didn't have any pertinent suggestions as to what I was doing, I found things to occupy in the time that I could book in the lab. The Teenager went back to school - although she ended up self-isolating twice - and Son No 2 went back to Uni. Things felt a bit more normal. I was still doing fine.

Come lockdown number 3, and I suddenly feel as if I'm stagnating. My yoga and exercise motivation has crumbled. I'm still allowed to go into work, but walking between the car park and the building , I find my knees are aching, and climbing the multitude of stairs to our penthouse lab whilst wearing a face mask is an exercise in torture. My ability to nod off is scary - I'm not quite 50, but five minutes in front of a scientific paper online and I'm fighting my eyelids. Walking with the Teenager, I find that she is outpacing me on upward slopes. It's like being in a permanent state of lethargy, and not helped by the feeling that I need to remain bright and positive because the In House GP is brought low by January and February, his least favourite months.

Anyway, I'm sorry. I have a roof over my head, enough to eat, I haven't lost anybody to this grim disease, so I have much to be thankful for. I just can't help feeling as though I've lost a piece of me over the last year and I don't know where it's gone!
I'm about the same age and also feeling the same way as you are bugmum .. X
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
2,343
Reaction score
7,553
Points
219
Location
York
Despite my life carrying on much as always, this lockdown has also been a step too far for me. The previous times I haven't minded not seeing the kids or being able to go out and do 'stuff'; I've been carrying on my normal writing, running working routine but it feels thin somehow. As though I'm making work for myself to do. This week I've had the week off work, a booked holiday I had to use up despite having nothing to use it up on. And I've realised how awful lockdown must be for all those people who are alone 24/7. Normally I meet and chat to people at work. Now I am spending eleven days in what feels like social isolation.

I''m getting a LOT of writing done. Plus I've decorated my bedroom and changed the furniture around. But I just want to sit and have coffee and a chat!
 

charliebrown

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
355
Reaction score
383
Points
63
Location
Earth
Since the U.S. is frozen in snow, vaccine deliveries are way behind.

My wife has tried to obtain a vaccination for about a month now with no results.

I read if you had Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura don’t take the shot, so that is me.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
43,320
Reaction score
34,431
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Since the U.S. is frozen in snow, vaccine deliveries are way behind.

My wife has tried to obtain a vaccination for about a month now with no results.

I read if you had Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura don’t take the shot, so that is me.
Uh-oh. I have something like that on my legs... :(
 

Analogue Boy

Bar 6
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
11,364
Reaction score
11,096
Points
309
I’ve lost my motivation somewhere along the line. Before lockdown, I was pretty jaded about life in general anyway but today I was thinking what I would do once this is over. Apart from being able to start doing proper walks again, I‘m finding the idea of a holiday dull in terms of investment. There’s nowhere I really want to visit. I’d find the drive too tedious and the hotel too expensive for what it offers. From Inverness to Land’s End, I’ve seen lots of the UK over the years and have seen a lot of changes - not necessarily for the better. Things that I used to find interesting just don’t grab me anymore.
 

BlackPeter

Ancient Badger
Joined
May 5, 2006
Messages
291
Reaction score
402
Points
79
Got my vaccine jab yesterday at my GP's - a bit odd because right next door (literally) to my GP surgery is a sports hall which is the local centre for vaccination (specifically told by my GP not to go there) arrived at surgery - huge queues at sports hall went into doctors -two of us in queue -asked nurse about reason why I had been called to surgery instead -no explanation and strangely evasive! Anyway no effects so far with jab -fairly standard for me with vaccines!
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
43,320
Reaction score
34,431
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Got my vaccine jab yesterday at my GP's - a bit odd because right next door (literally) to my GP surgery is a sports hall which is the local centre for vaccination (specifically told by my GP not to go there) arrived at surgery - huge queues at sports hall went into doctors -two of us in queue -asked nurse about reason why I had been called to surgery instead -no explanation and strangely evasive! Anyway no effects so far with jab -fairly standard for me with vaccines!
You got the 'special' vaccine, with the nanobots, the tracking chip, the black projects technology.
The ones who went to the sports hall got a fake vaccine.
 

charliebrown

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
355
Reaction score
383
Points
63
Location
Earth
So, if one is lucky enough to get two shots, can life return to normal with no worries?

Around our area people are still waiting for the first shot.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
20,907
Reaction score
29,243
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
So, if one is lucky enough to get two shots, can life return to normal with no worries?
Around our area people are still waiting for the first shot.
Whether you get a 1-shot or 2-shot vaccine ... Once you're vaccinated the disease is still an issue. You can still receive (get infected by) and transmit (pass on) the COVID-19 virus even though it won't make you sick anymore. There's also the fact that a minority of vaccinated folks may still get sick if infected, because the vaccine isn't 100% effective.

The social distancing and mask wearing will remain prudent precautions for the foreseeable future.
 

Naughty_Felid

kneesy earsy nosey
Joined
Mar 11, 2008
Messages
8,363
Reaction score
11,027
Points
294
I don't know what you are talking about. These are only the side effects they talk about in the paperwork. If they had persisted for four days - as it says in the paperwork - I would have contacted my GP. No point in getting hysterical.

True, I did consider calling in because of the chest pains - but since I'd had unexplained pains elsewhere during the previous 18 hours or so I decided on balance it wasn't justified.
All chest pains need to get checked out.
 

Victory

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
1,038
Reaction score
2,169
Points
154
Location
London
Sad to report that my friend's wife who was on a ventilator in a London hospital, died yesterday from Covid.

Late 40's.

Sixth person I know personally who had died from it, and I know a few more who are friends and relatives of friends.

I do not know the statistical implications of that, with context that I love in London, a large fairly crowded city, but in my opinion, with one exception, none of these people were likely to die this year.


I acknowledge the damaging social and economic effects of lockdown, but currently think that full lockdown should only lifted when all medically vulnerable people, plus all adults over 45, have had two jabs and then a month for the second jab's effects to fully take effect.

Outdoor socialising in very small groups is an acceptable level of risk, but with masks on for now.

If theatres, galleries etc are to re-open, then have limited capacities, and all customers to be temperature tested and wear masks.
But there is a risk in going, and if someone is any way vulnerable then wait until fully vaccinated.
 

GingerTabby

Carbon-based life form
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
1,286
Reaction score
2,868
Points
159
Sad to report that my friend's wife who was on a ventilator in a London hospital, died yesterday from Covid.

Late 40's.

Sixth person I know personally who had died from it, and I know a few more who are friends and relatives of friends.

I do not know the statistical implications of that, with context that I love in London, a large fairly crowded city, but in my opinion, with one exception, none of these people were likely to die this year.


I acknowledge the damaging social and economic effects of lockdown, but currently think that full lockdown should only lifted when all medically vulnerable people, plus all adults over 45, have had two jabs and then a month for the second jab's effects to fully take effect.

Outdoor socialising in very small groups is an acceptable level of risk, but with masks on for now.

If theatres, galleries etc are to re-open, then have limited capacities, and all customers to be temperature tested and wear masks.
But there is a risk in going, and if someone is any way vulnerable then wait until fully vaccinated.
That's very sad news, Victory. My condolences to you and your friend's family.
 
Last edited:

AnonyJoolz

Captainess Sensible
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Messages
1,393
Reaction score
4,317
Points
159
Location
Having a nice cup of tea and a sit-down.
Sad to report that my friend's wife who was on a ventilator in a London hospital, died yesterday from Covid.

Late 40's.

Sixth person I know personally who had died from it, and I know a few more who are friends and relatives of friends.

I do not know the statistical implications of that, with context that I love in London, a large fairly crowded city, but in my opinion, with one exception, none of these people were likely to die this year.


I acknowledge the damaging social and economic effects of lockdown, but currently think that full lockdown should only lifted when all medically vulnerable people, plus all adults over 45, have had two jabs and then a month for the second jab's effects to fully take effect.

Outdoor socialising in very small groups is an acceptable level of risk, but with masks on for now.

If theatres, galleries etc are to re-open, then have limited capacities, and all customers to be temperature tested and wear masks.
But there is a risk in going, and if someone is any way vulnerable then wait until fully vaccinated.
I am sorry to hear of your bereavements @Victory , my condolences to you.
 
Top