COVID-19: Non-Medical Effects (Responses; Disruptions; Etc.)

Cloudbusting

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His beliefs are more important to him than his job or other people's lives.
But it just seems a contradiction that a pharmacist would believe such things? I think that's what surprised me. Needless to say it's completely unethical.
 

Cochise

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Here's a COVID side-effect I didn't expect to see - people missing their morning and evening commutes ...


FULL STORY: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/m...e-left-some-missing-their-commute/ar-BB1cmU55
I'm not at all surprised by that - my commute - back in the 80's - was an hour long drive which required absolute concentration in fast heavy traffic. I found it allowed my mind to clear between the anxieties of home life and the pressures of work. Working from home as a single person is hard enough (to clear the mind and concentrate while household things need attention) - I can't imagine what it must be like locked in with the family, especially with pre-teen children.

edit - the vaccine poisoner - maybe its some sort of power trip - power madness seems to be spreading nearly as fast as Covid-19. As does a drastic loss of proportion - I suppose the two go together. Yes, Covid-19 is bad - but it could be much much worse. And no evaluation of other consequences seems to come in to the equation at all. I'm peeved this morning. I can't believe we are shutting the primary schools (in the UK) again. The youngest children are going to be the most affected - if we haven't learned by now that disturbances in the formative years are almost never resolvable in later life I guess we never will.

edit2- I'm in a ranting mood - and how dare our Government pretend that it is safe and or effective to arbitrarily decide to change the way a vaccine is administered (3 weeks to 12 weeks for the second shot) a regime which has not been trialled at all? Surely this is madness? They risk wasting all the first shots that have been given. I've apologised before for being somewhat of a slave to logic, but I have to have a rational explanation for things or I have to assume something else is going on - anything from panic to not actually believing the vaccine works anyway. I did jokingly suggest months ago that governments look on the vaccine as simply a way of extricating themselves from the excess panic they've induced - perhaps I should revisit that argument more seriously. PLEASE NOTE - I accept that Covid-19 exists, I accept it is serious - that doesn't mean we should turn off our critical faculties.
 
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Cochise

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From the Telegraph (behind paywall)

“The nightmare scenario is that a partial vaccination causes the virus to mutate even more rapidly. “Is it just me or does uncontrolled, high level community transmission with circulation of several new #SARSCoV2 #COVID19 variants while starting vaccination with modified schemes, leading to partial immunity in a large proportion, sound like a bad idea?”, asked Prof Isabella Eckerle, a virologist at the Geneva Centre for Emerging Viral Diseases.”
 

Cloudbusting

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edit2- I'm in a ranting mood - and how dare our Government pretend that it is safe and or effective to arbitrarily decide to change the way a vaccine is administered (3 weeks to 12 weeks for the second shot) a regime which has not been trialled at all? Surely this is madness? They risk wasting all the first shots that have been given.
I must admit, I was really shocked/surprised when this was reported. They must believe it will still be effective (fingers crossed that's the case) but the fact this approach hasn't been tested made me raise an eyebrow. I will be beyond 'peeved' if they're wrong about that. I did also wonder how the 'anti-vaxxer' movement might react to this change.

P.S. Just seen your other post and I had wondered that too (about increasing the possibility of mutations) although I don't have enough knowledge of epidemiology etc. to say how likely that is. But yes, that could be a nightmare scenario, inadvertently mutate the virus to be more deadly/harmful...
 
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Yithian

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I must admit, I was really shocked/surprised when this was reported. They must believe it will still be effective (fingers crossed that's the case) but the fact this approach hasn't been tested made me raise an eyebrow. I will be beyond 'peeved' if they're wrong about that. I did also wonder how the 'anti-vaxxer' movement might react to this change.

P.S. Just seen your other post and I had wondered that too (about increasing the possibility of mutations) although I don't have enough knowledge of epidemiology to say how likely that is. But yes, that could be a nightmare scenario, inadvertently mutate the virus to be more deadly/harmful...
The proffered rationale--and I am not a doctor but I listened to a doctor explain this--is that although you can still be infected with the virus after your first shot, nobody (at all) who has so been has subsequently been hospitalised. The argument is that getting those first shots out and deferring the second until later will save more lives.

As to how long those second shots can be safely deferred, I don't know, but I sincerely hope they do.
 

Cochise

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The proffered rationale--and I am not a doctor but I listened to a doctor explain this--is that although you can still be infected with the virus after your first shot, nobody (at all) who has so been has subsequently been hospitalised. The argument is that getting those first shots out and deferring the second until later will save more lives.

As to how long those second shots can be safely deferred, I don't know, but I sincerely hope they do.
But how long have they been vaccinating people? Hardly time for anyone to catch it again, surely? It's what, 14 days or more between being tested positive and developing severe symptoms?

This is all getting surreal, in my opinion. I realise there is a need to respond to a difficult situation, but you can't just flail around and hope everything goes well.
 

Yithian

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But how long have they been vaccinating people? Hardly time for anyone to catch it again, surely? It's what, 14 days or more between being tested positive and developing severe symptoms?

This is all getting surreal, in my opinion. I realise there is a need to respond to a difficult situation, but you can't just flail around and hope everything goes well.
I don't have this information, I'm afraid.

I only caught this development by chance.

My assumption--nothing more--is that this was discovered during the testing phase before 'going live'.
 

Yithian

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How did this story get past the editor?

It's incredibly stupid.

Resources are shifted around as and when needed or to where they are most likely to be needed. If the hospital wards overflow with critical patients in the new year, you will have a very different photo opportunity.

They didn't fire the medical staff and dump the ventilators in the Thames!
The follow-up story seems to have been missed.

NHS Nightingale reactivated and ready to admit patients, other such emergency facilities already doing so:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-55503536
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Gotta admire that revolutionary spirit!

Whilst we celebrated in muted fashion, with a few drinks at home and perhaps a half-hearted Auld Lang Syne, the French indulged their passion for some serious rioting.
41 cars burned in Angers and, when the fire brigade responded, they were attacked with fireworks:

https://www.ouest-france.fr/pays-de...artifice-ec96015a-4c0b-11eb-8544-189a42252dd8
French riot police break up illegal rave of an estimated 2,500 people.
Hundreds fined for curfew-breaking.
Could only see one burnt-out car in the video.

https://www.ouest-france.fr/bretagn...eufeurs-verbalises-par-la-gendarmerie-7106043
 

uair01

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Cochise

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That really would have been a shame!
Thankfully, it looks like some sort of modern MPV.
A 2CV might be one of the more sensible cars to own in the New Normal! Unfortunately one is now worth more than all my cars added together.
 

Victory

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Here's a COVID side-effect I didn't expect to see - people missing their morning and evening commutes ...
I do not miss the cost, traffic (when I drove) or stinky commuters (when I got the Underground train) of my commute, but as i have written elsewhere, I have yet to master "switching off" after work.

I suppose there has to be a admission to one's self that there is a need for a transition time equating to a "virtual commute", and that it is hard to quickly go from work mode to relaxation mode.
 

cycleboy2

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People on Teesside refusing the foreign-made vaccine, preferring to wait for the British one!

What fucking planet am I living on? Christ on a bike, that's depressing. Fucking, fuckity fuckwits if ever there were. Frankly I'd prefer the Pfizer if I was allowed to take it, for its greater fucking efficacy! Sorry about the swearing but some people are twats.

https://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/teesside-news/ill-wait-english-one-drs-19577767
 

Mythopoeika

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People on Teesside refusing the foreign-made vaccine, preferring to wait for the British one!

What fucking planet am I living on? Christ on a bike, that's depressing. Fucking, fuckity fuckwits if ever there were. Frankly I'd prefer the Pfizer if I was allowed to take it, for its greater fucking efficacy! Sorry about the swearing but some people are twats.

https://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/teesside-news/ill-wait-english-one-drs-19577767
Hold on there. The Oxford vaccine uses more conventional, tried and tested methods.
The Pfizer vaccine uses RNA, which makes it 'experimental'.
Pfizer's claim of 90-odd percentage efficacy is less believable than Oxford's humble claim of 70%. How could they get that figure, when there has been little time to test it properly? No, I'm inclined to trust a humble claim more than a 'gosh-wow' claim.
Also, AstraZeneca has stated that they won't be making a profit from the Oxford vaccine, which is why it is so cheap. Pfizer and Moderna are going to make a ton of money out of theirs. Gee, who do I trust more?
 

EnolaGaia

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Asocial distance flying is admittedly an approach for social distancing ...
Socialite says he bought out entire flight to travel privately

A wealthy Indonesian man who shared photos from a plane where he and his wife were the sole passengers said he bought all available tickets for the flight to prevent exposure to COVID-19.

Richard Muljadi, a Jakarta-based socialite famous for his extravagant lifestyle, posted a series of photos to his Instagram story showing he and his wife traveling alone on a Batik Air flight from Jakarta to Bali. ...

Muljadi said he bought as many tickets as possible for the flight -- which boasted 12 business class seats and 150 economy class seats -- because he and his wife, Shalvynne Chang, were "super paranoid" about being exposed to COVID-19.

He did not disclose how much he paid to keep the flight private, but he wrote the amount was "still cheaper" than chartering a private plane. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2021/0...ire-flight-to-travel-privately/3851610052474/
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Just listening to a debate on BBC Radio 5 Live about what constitutes a "key worker".
One account was from a teacher with classrooms still over 50% full during lockdown, as "key workers'" children have the right still to attend.
In one case, this included a child whose mum was a (go on have a guess!):

Dog groomer!

It seems that, if you are on decent terms with your boss or HR department, they will happily provide you with a letter categorising you as a "key worker" so your children may still attend school, which of course means free child-minding during work hours.
 

Cochise

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Just listening to a debate on BBC Radio 5 Live about what constitutes a "key worker".
One account was from a teacher with classrooms still over 50% full during lockdown, as "key workers'" children have the right still to attend.
In one case, this included a child whose mum was a (go on have a guess!):

Dog groomer!

It seems that, if you are on decent terms with your boss or HR department, they will happily provide you with a letter categorising you as a "key worker" so your children may still attend school, which of course means free child-minding during work hours.
Sexual therapist?
 

catseye

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Just listening to a debate on BBC Radio 5 Live about what constitutes a "key worker".
One account was from a teacher with classrooms still over 50% full during lockdown, as "key workers'" children have the right still to attend.
In one case, this included a child whose mum was a (go on have a guess!):

Dog groomer!

It seems that, if you are on decent terms with your boss or HR department, they will happily provide you with a letter categorising you as a "key worker" so your children may still attend school, which of course means free child-minding during work hours.
I am still slightly baffled by the fact that my status as a 'key worker' would entitle me to keep my children in school (should I have school age children, which I don't), but doesn't entitle me to have a vaccination any earlier than my age and illness status would otherwise.

So, are we vital, or not?
 

Cochise

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I am still slightly baffled by the fact that my status as a 'key worker' would entitle me to keep my children in school (should I have school age children, which I don't), but doesn't entitle me to have a vaccination any earlier than my age and illness status would otherwise.

So, are we vital, or not?
I presume they are working on the basis that the vast majority of key workers, even if they do catch it, will have relatively mild symptoms anyway.
 

catseye

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I presume they are working on the basis that the vast majority of key workers, even if they do catch it, will have relatively mild symptoms anyway.
But what about those who, like me, are knocking on a bit and have underlying health problems? In my case, I'm 60 and have asthma. Not enough to get me a priority vaccination, but enough to mean that Covid could knock me sideways for quite a long time. The same with many (the majority) of my colleagues. Retail is often a place where older people end up, we have been dealing face to face (well, mask to mask but you know what I mean) with the general public since the beginning. And yet...
 

Cochise

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But what about those who, like me, are knocking on a bit and have underlying health problems? In my case, I'm 60 and have asthma. Not enough to get me a priority vaccination, but enough to mean that Covid could knock me sideways for quite a long time. The same with many (the majority) of my colleagues. Retail is often a place where older people end up, we have been dealing face to face (well, mask to mask but you know what I mean) with the general public since the beginning. And yet...
I didn't say I agreed with them!

Still, if its any comfort, you have some likelihood of your immune system having acquired a degree of resistance due to being out and about and no doubt being exposed to a background level of virus. People who have been shielding for most of this time will be more vulnerable.

For some reason it's been dropped out of the discussion since the early days but you do need to acquire a virus load to develop the disease, exposure to the odd little spore here and there won't do it - but may start your immune system recognising a new threat.
 

catseye

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I didn't say I agreed with them!

Still, if its any comfort, you have some likelihood of your immune system having acquired a degree of resistance due to being out and about and no doubt being exposed to a background level of virus. People who have been shielding for most of this time will be more vulnerable.

For some reason it's been dropped out of the discussion since the early days but you do need to acquire a virus load to develop the disease, exposure to the odd little spore here and there won't do it - but may start your immune system recognising a new threat.
Sorry, Cochise, I didn't mean to imply that you did agree! We are hoping that what you say is the case! I did have one wonderful customer who, on being told that his favourite shop people weren't eligible for the vaccine, said 'well, if you haven't had it by now, with all this, you probably won't get it!' We do seem, as a general body, to be pretty healthy and I think it's because of all the low level germs we get every day.

Which leads me to wonder - when this is over and mask wearing and handwashing is no longer 'the in thing', are we all going to get much iller than we previously would have done? Because not not having had that low level exposure to viral loads?
 

Min Bannister

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I am still slightly baffled by the fact that my status as a 'key worker' would entitle me to keep my children in school (should I have school age children, which I don't), but doesn't entitle me to have a vaccination any earlier than my age and illness status would otherwise.

So, are we vital, or not?
I think it is first and foremost about reducing hospital admissions, especially as some hospitals are now cancelling urgent cancer operations in order to deal with the influx of covid patients. So people who have the highest chance of hospitalisation/death are being prioritised over those who have less chance, regardless of whether they might actually have a higher chance of actually catching it in the first place due to being customer facing. It's just a horrible situation for so many people.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-55572871

They continued: "People in here are moving heaven and earth to find beds in anticipation of what is coming and that's why some cancer patients even those who have been told their case is urgent are having their surgery cancelled."
Effectively the move means that choices are already being made within the health service about who should receive critical treatment.
 
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