COVID-19: Non-Medical Effects (Responses; Disruptions; Etc.)

ramonmercado

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Guilty of embezzlement though.

The leader of a South Korean religious sect has been found not guilty of breaking virus control laws.

Lee Man-hee, who heads the Shincheonji Church of Jesus, was however found guilty of embezzlement and given a suspended sentence. The church was at the centre of South Korea's first major Covid-19 outbreak last February, and was the target of public anger. At one point it was linked to 36% of cases in the country.

In March last year, the Seoul city government filed a legal complaint to prosecutors against Mr Lee and 11 other leaders of the sect. They were accused of homicide, causing harm and violating the Infectious Disease and Control Act.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-55642653
 

gordonrutter

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I knew it was still used for certain conditions, but I had no idea that the figure was that high.

Consider me re-educated!
I must admit I was of the same view until someone I knew received it which made me dig into the details about it a bit more.
 

catseye

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I fully applaud older patients/those most vulnerable/the already ill and their nursing staff getting the vaccines. Of course they should. But after those groups have been vaccinated, I think it would be nice if all those who have worked frontline jobs (but not in the NHS) at least got a timetable for their vaccinations.

It is the stress of working with the public every day, not knowing whether that headache you went home with was anything or whether you are going to wake up in the morning really ill. In some ways working is good, it stops us from catastrophising and believing the world to be an unsafe place, but it also means that we are constantly playing Russian Roulette with our health.

Maybe at least give the frontline workers over 55 a bump up in the figures! Once teachers and TAs are vaccinated then maybe we can start to get schools and colleges back.
 

Mythopoeika

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I must admit I was of the same view until someone I knew received it which made me dig into the details about it a bit more.
I thought it had been completely banned.
 

Xanatic*

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No, but the electricity used for it has to come from renewable sources like wind or geothermal.

I may have just made that up.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Some 10 000 people per year in the U.K. still receive it.
Woah!

It's because for some seriously depressed people it works.

Unless you've seen people who shit and piss themselves, sitting in their own urine and feces and don't eat or drink and are literally dying before your eyes it actually works.

People and families, I know and I've seen it myself swear by it. People say it literally, transformed, it saved their lives.

It's not taken likely - It's for treatment-resistant people.

Pisses me off how ill-informed people are about something that has saved countless lives.
 

Yithian

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Pisses me off how ill-informed people are about something that has saved countless lives.
I should like to reinforce the difference between being ill-informed and ignorant here.

In the sense that most people without first-hand experience of this field of medicine have not been well informed about the nature of such treatment.

I'm not convinced that people are willfully sticking their heads in the sand.
 

gordonrutter

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Woah!

It's because for some seriously depressed people it works.

Unless you've seen people who shit and piss themselves, sitting in their own urine and feces and don't eat or drink and are literally dying before your eyes it actually works.

People and families, I know and I've seen it myself swear by it. People say it literally, transformed, it saved their lives.

It's not taken likely - It's for treatment-resistant people.

Pisses me off how ill-informed people are about something that has saved countless lives.
I hope none of that is aimed at me. As has been pointed out I merely stated a fact. I also said that a couple of people I knew had undergone it so yes I have seen the transformative power that it has when used correctly.
 

Stormkhan

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The footballers have had it explained to them, again and again, why they shouldn't do this ... but they still do it.
While I'm far from a fan, I understand that they get emotional over scoring a goal but if doing so removes any memory of recent world-wide events regarding the easily-transmissible virus then they really should shack up together.
In isolation, of course.
 

EnolaGaia

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Results of vision testing performed in China indicates a major increase in signs of myopia among school children during the last year. It's suspected that the increased screen time and book reading imposed by lockdown measures may be to blame.
The Pandemic Could Be Harming Kids' Eyesight, But It Isn't The Virus to Blame

School closures are among the more controversial options for controlling the COVID-19 pandemic, with authorities debating whether the preventative measure is worth the potential educational, social, and emotional costs.

Researchers in China have uncovered yet another health concern faced by children kept in isolation for extended periods; deteriorating eyesight.

Short-sightedness – what is medically referred to as myopia – is already a concerning problem in East Asian countries, prompting China to make it a health priority in recent years.

One of its public programs is an annual eye exam for school children. Based on a diagnostic process called photoscreening, the system captures light-induced reflexes in each eye, giving technicians a snapshot of refractive errors or misalignments in crucial eye anatomy.

Researchers used photoscreening records from children in 10 Shandong elementary schools, all collected at the start of every school year since 2015.

With COVID forcing the closure of schools for the first half of 2020, a new school year was kicked off in June rather than the usual September. But the usual screening took place nonetheless, giving eye specialists and researchers a good look at the eyes of thousands of children aged six to 13.

All up, the five consecutive years of testing provided the scientists with a glimpse into a total of 389,808 eyeballs.

An analysis of the frequency of refractive errors found in all of those eyes revealed a relatively stable trend from 2015 to 2019, with perhaps a slight shift towards myopia.

That shift was unmistakable in 2020's results though, with a substantial jump in errors that qualify as short-sightedness, significantly among six to eight year olds.

In fact, the prevalence of myopia in children aged six was three times more than in those of any previous year.

While we can only speculate over the cause of the widespread change, staring intently at books and screens for long periods while isolated indoors will do the trick just nicely. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.sciencealert.com/the-pa...s-eyesight-but-it-s-not-covid-we-should-blame
 

Naughty_Felid

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"Electroshock" is either a weird translation or an unfortunate metaphor.

That treatment having been largely consigned to history as ineffective and inhumane.
It's this and other posts. It's not what you see in the movies or TV. It's so difficult to get the family to talk about it because they think it's "ineffective" or "inhumane". Like this sort of post.

When people are at the point of catatonia or such serious depression that literally nothing else works it's the last port of call. It's not a nice treatment but it is painless, but may result in some short term memory loss. However, it's a very carefully performed procedure that everyone takes very seriously and it's changed so much over the years.

It saves so many lives and yet it is difficult to get family on board because of the misconceptions.

You cannot believe the amazing difference it can make.
 

Yithian

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It's this and other posts. It's not what you see in the movies or TV. It's so difficult to get the family to talk about it because they think it's "ineffective" or "inhumane". Like this sort of post.

When people are at the point of catatonia or such serious depression that literally nothing else works it's the last port of call. It's not a nice treatment but it is painless, but may result in some short term memory loss. However, it's a very carefully performed procedure that everyone takes very seriously and it's changed so much over the years.

It saves so many lives and yet it is difficult to get family on board because of the misconceptions.

You cannot believe the amazing difference it can make.
I had in mind electroshock treatment being administered without consent, and to 'treat' homosexuality and various manias, both of which I had heard of taking place previously.

I had no idea that more legitimate functions had been established.
 

Spookdaddy

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...It saves so many lives and yet it is difficult to get family on board because of the misconceptions.

You cannot believe the amazing difference it can make.
Yes. I know of a couple of instances where ECT has been used to pretty amazing effect (especially in the case of a friend's dad, who had been virtually catatonic with depression, and hardly left his bedroom for at least a couple of years before the family finally elected to take the treatment).

As is often the case, its not the treatment, but its over and/or inappropriate application that should be at issue.
 

Gloucestrian

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ECT is not as primitive as it once was. They administer muscle relaxants to reduce the effects of the triggered seizure, the current is extremely small and very carefully applied to specific areas of the brain. It is still a very serious procedure that has a wide array of side effects so it is used in select cases only. I know someone who has had this treatment.
 

Gloucestrian

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[…]and hardly left his bedroom for at least a couple of years
You say that like it is a bad thing, it can be a valid life choice too! & anyway it is not as though there's much point in going out any more. #HikikomoriLife
 
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