COVID-19: Non-Medical Effects (Responses; Disruptions; Etc.)

blessmycottonsocks

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I think the problem is that the media - and politicians - overdo the 'envy of the world' thing. Viewed purely as a service and ignoring what means are used to pay for it, the NHS is not much different to health services in other wealthy countries. And there is no particular reason why it should be.

That's not a criticism.

What poor people in other rich countries envy is that you get free treatment without having to become destitute first.

Yes, yes, I know we pay for it through tax, but I'm quite happy to do that, because given my life experience I know that one can be well off one minute and 6 months later struggling.
FWIW, I have had first hand experience of both the NHS and the French health service. The French system is widely regarded as one of the word's best and is a pragmatic and highly efficient collaboration between private and public.
My late mother-in-law was a nurse in the French system and had to be hospitalised once in England after having a bad fall when visiting us. Whilst pleasantly surprised that there was nothing to pay for her treatment, she was not so pleasantly surprised at the long wait to be seen and she did comment on nurses not getting changed when they left the hospital for a break and then came back in to the ward, still wearing the same shoes. That would never be permitted in France.
The UK could do a lot worse than modelling our system on the French one. To do that though would require a bit more funding for starters - i.e. higher taxes, and to lose the dogmatic belief that all things private are bad.
 

Cochise

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FWIW, I have had first hand experience of both the NHS and the French health service. The French system is widely regarded as one of the word's best and is a pragmatic and highly efficient collaboration between private and public.
My late mother-in-law was a nurse in the French system and had to be hospitalised once in England after having a bad fall when visiting us. Whilst pleasantly surprised that there was nothing to pay for her treatment, she was not so pleasantly surprised at the long wait to be seen and she did comment on nurses not getting changed when they left the hospital for a break and then came back in to the ward, still wearing the same shoes. That would never be permitted in France.
The UK could do a lot worse than modelling our system on the French one. To do that though would require a bit more funding for starters - i.e. higher taxes, and to lose the dogmatic belief that all things private are bad.
I don't know the situation in France. But I lived in the US for five years and I would say that generally the 'hospital experience' is better - IF you are insured and can pay for it. Because the UK will treat all and sundry for free - and will treat many minor ailments that in a country you had to pay would go untreated - the 'average' experience may be slightly worse than the US. But for a poor person - or even a relatively wealthy person that develops an illness not covered by insurance you get treatment in the UK that is generally unavailable elsewhere.

I had a chap working for me in the US, Bill Barnes. He developed cancer - a form of leukemia I believe (I'm not a medical practitioner). Because it was deemed that this form of cancer was hereditary - Bill didn't know - and Bill hadn't mentioned it when getting insured, they would not cover his costs. To get treated he had to volunteer for 'experimental treatment' . He also couldn't marry his girlfriend because they would have passed on any costs to her. He was working for me via a laptop literally the day before he died. Not because I made him, but because he wanted to complete his part of the project.

I hope that goes some way to explaining why I think the way we pay for medical care in the UK is the best system in the world.
 

Yithian

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You all know the rule about using this board to level insults at politicians.

We don't want it, we don't accept it, and the next time someone does it they will receive an official warning.

And if they try to justify themselves by saying that another member did it first, we'll probably make it a temporary ban.
 

Ogdred Weary

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Not in Seoul (there was a cluster outbreak in Itaewon last week), but elsewhere they've never closed en masse.

Are you suggesting I need a drink to chill out?

:D
Nope, but I certainly do.

Hope you are still able to enjoy one in your local.
 

ramonmercado

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Banks Will Repossess Houses Due To COVID-19. Demons Will Repossess People.

A practising exorcist has claimed the “frustration and anger” sparked during the coronavirus pandemic could lead to an increase in demonic possession.

Buddhist priest Paul Devlin, who described his first possessed victim as having “pointed teeth” and “black eyes”, sensationally believes demons could take advantage of the current fear and uncertainty.

In an exclusive interview with Daily Star Online, he said: “It is a very difficult time for everybody, the coronavirus has created a lot of fear and a lot of negativity. There is not a lot of positive stuff around at the moment – that’s the kind of thing that dark forces use to their advantage.”

Paul warned that people in self-isolation specifically may have negative emotions which could entice malevolent forces in.

https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/weird-news/exorcist-fears-coronavirus-pandemic-see-22030136
 

Ogdred Weary

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Banks Will Repossess Houses Due To COVID-19. Demons Will Repossess People.

A practising exorcist has claimed the “frustration and anger” sparked during the coronavirus pandemic could lead to an increase in demonic possession.

Buddhist priest Paul Devlin, who described his first possessed victim as having “pointed teeth” and “black eyes”, sensationally believes demons could take advantage of the current fear and uncertainty.

In an exclusive interview with Daily Star Online, he said: “It is a very difficult time for everybody, the coronavirus has created a lot of fear and a lot of negativity. There is not a lot of positive stuff around at the moment – that’s the kind of thing that dark forces use to their advantage.”

Paul warned that people in self-isolation specifically may have negative emotions which could entice malevolent forces in.

https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/weird-news/exorcist-fears-coronavirus-pandemic-see-22030136
Hmm, I sense a scam coming on. Online exorcisms...
 

Lb8535

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Banks Will Repossess Houses Due To COVID-19. Demons Will Repossess People.

A practising exorcist has claimed the “frustration and anger” sparked during the coronavirus pandemic could lead to an increase in demonic possession.

Buddhist priest Paul Devlin, who described his first possessed victim as having “pointed teeth” and “black eyes”, sensationally believes demons could take advantage of the current fear and uncertainty.

In an exclusive interview with Daily Star Online, he said: “It is a very difficult time for everybody, the coronavirus has created a lot of fear and a lot of negativity. There is not a lot of positive stuff around at the moment – that’s the kind of thing that dark forces use to their advantage.”

Paul warned that people in self-isolation specifically may have negative emotions which could entice malevolent forces in.

https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/weird-news/exorcist-fears-coronavirus-pandemic-see-22030136
I don't know of any Buddhist tradition that includes the concept of possession by demons, except in that we all metaphorically always carry "hungry ghosts" with us and need to be aware when they are governing our behavior. So yes I'm thinking scam. And could Rev. Devlin advise what form of therapy he is licensed in?
 

EnolaGaia

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Hmm, I sense a scam coming on. Online exorcisms...
I don't disagree, but ...

In the interview Devlin proceeds to express caution / apprehension about attempting exorcisms via remote links.

... But Paul said he would be reluctant to carry out virtual exorcisms over Skype because of the violent nature of exorcisms.

"This pandemic has many challenges and one of the challenges I face is doing exorcisms without face2face contact," he said.

"It is possible however very complicated you have to be so careful.

"Some exorcisms can be very aggressive you never know what the reaction can be."

The exorcist went on to explain that "demonic energies" will "go down fighting" if they are being evicted from their host. ...

“They can lash out at the hosts family and cause much damage," he continued.

“I feel it would be unfair for the family to be left to deal with that. ...
https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/weird-news/exorcist-fears-coronavirus-pandemic-see-22030136
 

Analogue Boy

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"This pandemic has many challenges and one of the challenges I face is doing exorcisms without face2face contact," he said.
So he is at least familiar with Demonic Face Time then? I doubt any of his serious work is done ‘face2face’.
 

EnolaGaia

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Lockdown isolation has forced some folks to incur unexpectedly increased exposure to their spouses, significant others or housemates. Others are grappling with increased daily exposure to their children.

Still others are dealing with the ghosts inhabiting their residences.
Quarantining With a Ghost? It's Scary

... For those whose experience of self-isolation involves what they believe to be a ghost, their days are punctuated not just by Zoom meetings or home schooling but by disembodied voices, shadowy figures, misbehaving electronics, invisible cats cozying up on couches, caresses from hands that aren’t there and even, in some cases — to borrow the technical parlance of “Ghostbusters” — free-floating, full-torso vaporous apparitions.

Some of these people are frightened, of course. Others say they just appreciate the company. ...
FULL STORY:
https://news.yahoo.com/quarantining-ghost-scary-192530130.html

ORIGINAL PRESENTATION:
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/14/style/haunted-house-ghost-quarantine.html
 

Trevp666

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I see my pic has been wiped from the memory then <sad face>
Unfortunately I couldn't think of anyone else called Dominic whose picture I could use.
Or at least not anyone that people would recognise.
 

Trevp666

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Who? Oh, a quick google shows he's a french actor I've never heard of.
I was thinking of maybe then, Dom from 'Dick & Dom' but I wouldn't recognise him if he jumped out on the street and bit me.
Actor Dom DeLuise....but that's probably from too long ago so not so recognisable these days.
There's another political Dominic but best not to mention him, and again, he's not so recognisable.
And then I got it.

Dom Joly!

So here in it's re-imaged glory.....

.
dominic possession 2.png
 

EnolaGaia

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Good news for obsessive Francophones ...
Arbiters of the French language say 'Covid' is feminine

For months, the people of France have faced an énigme.

Was Covid-19, the new coronavirus tearing across the globe, masculine or feminine? Grammatically speaking, that is. In practical terms, should the French use a "le" or a "la" before the disease's name?
Now, the group charged with preserving the French language has spoken. Covid-19, the Académie Française decided, is assuredly feminine, despite its increasingly common usage with the masculine article. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/16/world/academie-franciase-covid-feminine-trnd/index.html
 

Sabresonic

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My dad kept ringing me while I was having a takeaway and I said to my partner ' I'm going to block him for an hour as he is doing my head in' and she said 'Is that wise' and I said 'your right I better block him for a month'.
I get my coat.
 

EnolaGaia

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Sometimes things aren't what they first appear to be. This is especially true in these chaotic pandemic times.

For example, consider this photo of what seems to be a priest driven to carjacking ...

Pelc-SquirtGun.jpeg

Priest draws squirt gun in fight against coronavirus

A Roman Catholic priest in the Detroit area has taken aim at his parishioners in a bid to maintain social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic, using a squirt gun to shoot holy water.

Photos posted on social media by the St. Ambrose Church show the Rev. Tim Pelc shooting water into a car window as it stopped by the steps of the church on Easter. He wore a mask, face shield and rubber gloves as further precautions against spreading the coronavirus.

The photos of the priest at the church in Grosse Pointe Park have inspired memes online. One shows the 70-year-old priest amid the fires of hell directing the squirt gun at devil-like figures.

Pelc told BuzzFeed News for an article over the weekend that he was a little concerned about how the Vatican might react when the photos of him squirting holy water began circulating widely on the internet. But, he said, “I haven’t heard anything yet.”

The idea was to find a way to continue a tradition of blessing Easter baskets despite the pandemic. One photo shows Pelc standing behind a car with its hatchback door up, shooting water at a basket flowers. ...
SOURCE: https://apnews.com/37fb584e6347fe1418b3f67b592daf0d
 

ramonmercado

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Premium mannequins! Nice euphemism!

It is a challenge for sports leagues across the world - if play can only resume in empty stadiums, how can the atmosphere be improved?

However, not many clubs will be rushing to follow the example of FC Seoul. The top-flight South Korean side has apologised after fans accused them of using sex dolls in the stands FC Seoul insisted they were "premium mannequins" rather than sex dolls - but did admit they came from a supplier that produces sex toys. And some of the dolls were holding signs advertising x-rated websites - despite pornography being banned in South Korea.

The mannequins' manufacturer told the BBC they had apologised to FC Seoul. But they also reiterated that the dolls were merely "premium mannequins".

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-52702075
 

ramonmercado

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Who does he think he is? An American God?

Police have spoken to author Neil Gaiman after he admitted breaking Scotland's lockdown rules by travelling 11,000 miles from New Zealand to Skye.

The Good Omens and American Gods writer left his wife and son in Auckland so he could "isolate" at his island retreat. He wrote on his online blog: "Hullo from Scotland, where I am in rural lockown on my own."

Police Scotland said officers had visited Mr Gaiman at his holiday home on Skye. Insp Linda Allan said the officers spoke to the author "about his actions". She said: "He has been given suitable advice about essential travel and reminded about the current guidelines in Scotland."

The science fiction and fantasy author has been criticised for "endangering" local people".

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-52705243
 

Kondoru

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I dont know what is more terrible; the flagrant disobedience of the rules, or the police fuss over perfectly nornal travel...
 

Swifty

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... and how many people there are that are employed in high paid positions which don't appear to actually have any purpose.
I'm an ex NHS ward worker (20 or so years ago), my Sister's a current ward worker and we're loyal as anything to the current NHS but yes ... too many 'chiefs' and not enough Indians has been a rot that's been going on for too long .. I've experienced it as a staff member, watched it as a patient and there's a lot of fat that needs to be trimmed off .. there's loads of career focussed 19 year old still strutting on the wards past the patients ringing their bells to work out as quickly as possible who's arse to kiss so they can get a desk job instead of having to actually wipe someone's arse or indeed talk to an upset patient .. the NHS is a gravy train to those tools ..
 

Trevp666

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the NHS is a gravy train to those tools
Of course, there's no discrediting any of the fine people who work extremely hard, day in, day out, for not enough pay, of which there are many.

I expect what you're talking about the people who go through their education coming out of university with a degree in, oooh, I dunno, let's say 'Media Studies' (always a good one to quote, that), and then through nepotism (or somehow) end up in a 'desk job' role at a big NHS hospital as (e.g.) "Social Media & Content Digital Marketing Enfranchisement Manager", or "Organisational Transformation and Diversity Lead Consultant", and such.

I've just recalled a conversation with my friends missus that we had a couple of years ago, in which she told me that there are a number of parking spaces in a certain part of the car park with little signs in front of them, reserving them for senior staff members. These spaces are apparently often empty. One day she was going in to work and noticed that the little signs were being removed and she asked the bloke removing them why? Were these spaces being turned into 'regular spaces' as the car park was usually full?
No. The little signs were being replaced with larger ones as the job titles were getting too big to fit on to them.
 

Frideswide

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I expect what you're talking about the people who go through their education coming out of university with a degree in, oooh, I dunno, let's say 'Media Studies' (always a good one to quote, that), and then through nepotism (or somehow) end up in a 'desk job' role at a big NHS hospital as (e.g.) "Social Media & Content Digital Marketing Enfranchisement Manager", or "Organisational Transformation and Diversity Lead Consultant", and such.


Is it all degrees? some degrees? from all validating bodies or just some of them?

Given Capacity and Competence, in the way they are used in HE of course, what is it that you are objecting to @Trevp666

We can start discussing Media Studies perhaps? I'm interested in the common strands that let you rubbish an entire discipline! If there is one place and course in particular which has whetted your ire then name and shame! :twothumbs:
 

Cochise

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Is it all degrees? some degrees? from all validating bodies or just some of them?

Given Capacity and Competence, in the way they are used in HE of course, what is it that you are objecting to @Trevp666

We can start discussing Media Studies perhaps? I'm interested in the common strands that let you rubbish an entire discipline! If there is one place and course in particular which has whetted your ire then name and shame! :twothumbs:
Never went to university. None of my friends or family did. Don't know what they do there, but if you've taken a degree in something utterly irrelevant to the job you are applying for should it count for anything?

On the other hand I totally support the study of utterly arcane stuff like , say Etruscan pottery, so I guess I'm inconsistent. The Civil Service used to be the place you'd end up with a degree in something like that, because the CS actively encourages people to have an abiding interest outside work. Or used to, when I was in it.

But there are people with degrees who assume they know better or are more entitled than those without, and I don't think that is necessarily tied to the subject of the degree.

I actually preferred to employ people without degrees - they were easier to teach. A couple of A levels should ensure they are literate. My business partner nearly threw his toys out the pram when I wanted to hire a Goth.

edit: I've just remembered the bloke I hired with a degree in 'business studies' who didn't know the difference between an invoice and a delivery note. Nice chap, rich parents, not a clue. But after - what was it - three years experience in the real word he was definitely improving - I've always hoped that people who work for me leave with better knowledge than when they arrived.
 
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ramonmercado

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Reflections on past pandemics and how preparations to deal with possible pandemics were dismantled.

How a Pandemic Happens: We Knew This Was Coming
By Mike Davis
“So it’s really as bad as that,” said Miranda.

“It’s as bad as anything can be,” said Adam, “all the theaters and nearly all the shops and restaurants are closed, and the streets have been full of funerals all day and ambulances all night.”

–Pale Horse, Pale Rider

In this celebrated short novel written 20 years after the event, Katherine Ann Porter recorded her own near-death experience during the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918–19. She spent nine days in the hallway of an overwhelmed Denver hospital, burning with fever, drifting in and out of hallucinations. Her lover, a young lieutenant awaiting orders to leave for France, lay elsewhere, dying. Shivering on her steel gurney and given up as hopeless by her doctor, Miranda/Ann sees phantoms, soldiers, and executioners hovering over an “old man in filthy clothes”:

The road to death is a long march beset with all evils and the heart fails little by little at each new terror, the bones rebel at each step, the mind sets up its own bitter resistance and to what end? The barriers sink one by one, and no covering of the eyes shuts out the landscape of disaster, nor the sight of crimes committed there.

In 1918–19, despite enormous recent advances built upon the fundamental discoveries of Koch and Pasteur a generation earlier, medical science was almost as helpless in the face of the pandemic as had been the physicians, alchemists and astrologers called upon to cure the Great Plague of 1665–66 in London. If the US Public Health Service wagered everything on the distribution of an ultimately worthless vaccine, the remedy in Daniel Defoe’s time was to slaughter all the cats in the city—a great windfall for infected rats. In both eras medicine chased phantoms: the plague bacillus was finally identified by Alexandra Yersin in 1894 while a full characterization of the 1918 virus waited until 2000 when an expedition brought back the frozen lungs of an original victim from the Arctic.

Today’s “landscape of disaster” is eerily similar to 1665 and 1918: urban populations locked inside their apartments, the flight of the rich to their country homes, the cancellation of public events and schools, desperate trips to the markets that often end with infection; society’s reliance upon hero nurses, the lack of beds in hospitals and pesthouses, the mad search for masks, and the widespread suspicion that alien powers are at work (Jews, a passing comet, German saboteurs, the Chinese).

“Fast vaccines,” a universal flu shot, high-speed mask production—bells should have rang out, but they didn’t.
But this time around there was little mystery about the identity of the microbe—SARS-CoV-2 was sequenced almost overnight in January—or the steps necessary to fight it. Since the discovery of the HIV virus in 1983 and the recognition that it had jumped from apes to humans, science has been on high alert against the appearance of deadly new diseases with pandemic potential that have crossed over from wild fauna. This new age of plagues, like previous pandemic epochs, is directly the result of economic globalization.

The Black Death, for instance, was the inadvertent consequence of the Mongol conquest of inner Eurasia, which allowed Chinese rodents to hitchhike along the trade routes from northern China to Central Europe and the Mediterranean. Today, as was the case when I wrote Monster fifteen years ago, multinational capital has been the driver of disease evolution through the burning or logging out of tropical forests, the proliferation of factory farming, the explosive growth of slums and concomitantly of “informal employment,” and the failure of the pharmaceutical industry to find profit in mass producing lifeline antivirals, new-generation antibiotics, and universal vaccines.

Forest destruction, whether by multinationals or desperate subsistence farmers, eliminates the barrier between human populations and the reclusive wild viruses endemic to birds, bats, and mammals. Factory farms and giant feedlots act as huge incubators of novel viruses while appalling sanitary conditions in slums produce populations that are both densely packed and immune compromised. The inability of global capitalism to create jobs in the so-called “developing world” means that a billion or more subsistence workers (the “informal proletariat”) lack an employer link to healthcare or the income to purchase treatment from the private sector, leaving them dependent upon collapsing public hospitals systems, if they even exist.

https://lithub.com/how-a-pandemic-happens-we-knew-this-was-coming/
 
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