Cromer!

escargot

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Ah now we know some of those publications.

Off the top of my head -

Cassell's Weekly, a large-print magazine published in tabloid form, carried our very own Escargot Letter, sent in by Charles Fort on the subject of early anomalous aircraft.

@Stormkhan will know about the Strand Magazine which published Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories.

Tit Bits was a popular interest magazine that was still running in at least the late 1960s.
It carried household material like recipes and gardening tips.
There was also coverage of the scandals of the time.
At the end of Kind Hearts and Coronets a reporter from Tit Bits (played with farcical dignity by Arthur Lowe) meets Louis out of prison to negotiate the purchase of his memoirs.

Pearson's Weekly was similar but more cerebral, with short stories and travel articles.

'Novelettes' were short novels for quick reading, often Reader's Digest-sized but thinner.

They were hugely popular with the new 'reading classes' who were the first generation to benefit from compulsory primary education after the 1870 Education Act.

Some of these novelettes were comic 'yellowbacks' with humorous cover drawings. They were the more respectable alternatives to the vulgarly sensationalist 'Penny Dreadfuls' that commuters wouldn't want to be seen with.

These publications were called 'novelettes' to distinguish them from the conventional bulky three-volume Victorian novel. Nobody wanted to tote those wordy tomes around on the train.

Victorian popular literature is an absolutely fascinating subject and one of my favourite art forms.

Many of the famous novels and short stories we know of today were first published as part works and items in magazines. People would have flocked to that shop for their reading matter. What a spiffing find.
 

Swifty

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Ah now we know some of those publications.

Off the top of my head -

Cassell's Weekly, a large-print magazine published in tabloid form, carried our very own Escargot Letter, sent in by Charles Fort on the subject of early anomalous aircraft.

@Stormkhan will know about the Strand Magazine which published Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories.

Tit Bits was a popular interest magazine that was still running in at least the late 1960s.
It carried household material like recipes and gardening tips.
There was also coverage of the scandals of the time.
At the end of Kind Hearts and Coronets a reporter from Tit Bits (played with farcical dignity by Arthur Lowe) meets Louis out of prison to negotiate the purchase of his memoirs.

Pearson's Weekly was similar but more cerebral, with short stories and travel articles.

'Novelettes' were short novels for quick reading, often Reader's Digest-sized but thinner.

They were hugely popular with the new 'reading classes' who were the first generation to benefit from compulsory primary education after the 1870 Education Act.

Some of these novelettes were comic 'yellowbacks' with humorous cover drawings. They were the more respectable alternatives to the vulgarly sensationalist 'Penny Dreadfuls' that commuters wouldn't want to be seen with.

These publications were called 'novelettes' to distinguish them from the conventional bulky three-volume Victorian novel. Nobody wanted to tote those wordy tomes around on the train.

Victorian popular literature is an absolutely fascinating subject and one of my favourite art forms.

Many of the famous novels and short stories we know of today were first published as part works and items in magazines. People would have flocked to that shop for their reading matter. What a spiffing find.
I wish we could bring back the description 'spiffing' .. I sometimes use the word 'splendid' nowadays .. thanks for the breakdown on those title's contents :cool: .. and there's a very similar shop front bar above a window in Garden Street, Cromer .. from memory also claret red with gold lettering .. it's not a shop anymore, just a mystery building and you can't see into the windows because ever since I've been here, it's got velvet looking redish material blocking the view .. It might be a private home now? .. I've never had the courage to knock on the door tbh .. I'll take a pic of it and edit this post when I can ..
 

Dinobot

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I wish we could bring back the description 'spiffing' .. I sometimes use the word 'splendid' nowadays .. thanks for the breakdown on those title's contents :cool: .. and there's a very similar shop front bar above a window in Garden Street, Cromer .. from memory also claret red with gold lettering .. it's not a shop anymore, just a mystery building and you can't see into the windows because ever since I've been here, it's got velvet looking redish material blocking the view .. It might be a private home now? .. I've never had the courage to knock on the door tbh .. I'll take a pic of it and edit this post when I can ..
I was spiffing, once. The ointment made life better....
 

Nosmo King

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I wish we could bring back the description 'spiffing' .. I sometimes use the word 'splendid' nowadays .. thanks for the breakdown on those title's contents :cool: .. and there's a very similar shop front bar above a window in Garden Street, Cromer .. from memory also claret red with gold lettering .. it's not a shop anymore, just a mystery building and you can't see into the windows because ever since I've been here, it's got velvet looking redish material blocking the view .. It might be a private home now? .. I've never had the courage to knock on the door tbh .. I'll take a pic of it and edit this post when I can ..
Brothel :p
 

Swifty

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Hold the font page and make sure you're sitting down ! .. forget covid and the other problems of the world we are all facing .. a few ceiling tiles fell from the ceiling in Cromer's Morrisons supermarket yesterday so they had to close for health and safety reasons. Initial reports are that there were no causalities. Management are trying to cover it up by stating that the regional manager was there and spotted "a few loose ceiling tiles" but my inside sources tell me that tiles did in fact fall. Won't somebody think of the children for God's sake?!! ..
 

Swifty

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Wonderful!

Circulating Libraries were very much a feature of seaside-resorts and watering-places, dating back to Regency times.

The ghost-signs you helped uncover may have been the latest of many. Do you know the age of the buildings? :)
A bit more info on that building with the sign:

"
This panel was recently uncovered and because of its length has been photographed in three sections. It is next to Huckleberry's, outside Strand House, which was built 1885-90. C. Munday leased 43 Church Street from 1906 and opened a circulating library there. He had previously worked for W.H. Smith & Son in their building in London's Strand, so the building where he opened his Cromer shop is called Strand House. A commercial circulating libraries was also operated by Jarrold's.
(Reference: 'A Dictionary of Cromer & Overstrand History' by Christopher Pipe)"
 

Swifty

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Seen outside our church today ..

acarrige.jpg
 

Swifty

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Wasnt that the coach Katie Price used when she married Peter Andre?
That one was pink but I know what you mean, the locals were joking that this one was just beating the fuel crisis.
 

Nosmo King

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Swifty

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View attachment 45898

If you search YouTube for, "sex pistols cromer", this comes up.

Even if no actual concert footage therein, still a snapshot of the times!

Live Clips From 1977


@https://youtu.be/zABUc4SAtWY


A couple of photos from that night?

http://www.philjens.plus.com/pistols/pistols/bootleg_Cromer_1977.html
Of the 3 people I've met who say they went to that gig, they've all said the Pistols were rubbish that night. After the gig, the Pistols went for a drink at what used to be The Dolphin Pub. The place is now a restaurant called Lilly Mai's, before that it was Craft Burger and before that is was The Dolphin Pub. Way before that at the turn of the century it was a boarding house, Arthur Conan Doyle stayed in one of the first floor rooms and wrote some of The Hound Of The Baskervilles there.

The Links Pavilion no longer exists, I can't remember if I was told that it was because it had burned down or that it had been demolished but some massive bands played there.
 
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Swifty

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Now for some Cromerian entertainment from a more genteel age . . .

Youtube popped this in my Intray today . . .

Quiet Weekend, Cromer, 1953.

I presume Utting & Garfield were making private recordings as a sideline to more general electrics/record retail in Central Buildings.

Any more ghost-signs, Swifty? :)

Not yet Jim but it does make me wonder how many there might be hidden that were painted over and are just waiting to be discovered. We do have this wonderful old advertising mirror above what is now a newsagents on Chapel Street ..

https://www.instantstreetview.com/@52.931138,1.298875,58.38h,19.83p,2z,tKPh7Xlm8JTX2Dqdrdswiw
 
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