Cycling

escargot

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We're having lovely cycling weather; bright, dry, sunny, cold. I wrap up like The Mummy (if The Mummy had vi-viz bandages) and am perfectly cosy. I do 10+ miles a day, just keeping things ticking over. Being careful to ride in a big circle no further than about 5 miles from home in case the rozzers take an interest.

On my ride yesterday I took a wrong turn and ended up at a popular dogging/gricing spot. o_O

Well, more trainspotting goes on in the day and the doggers have it at night. :chuckle:

It's also a track access point. I noticed a lovely line guidance sign which indicates which tracks are up/down/fast/slow etc. Will get a photo next time.
Trains and bikes, eh. And doggers. ;)
 

Naughty_Felid

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I remember back in 94-95? a friend of mine in the local was very worried that his brother had gone missing. Days then weeks went by. He hadn’t used his credit cards, and back then didn’t have a mobile.

Then his body was found next to his bike in a wheat field only a few miles away. It seemed that he had been biking, turned into the field gate for some reason, maybe just to rest, but must have gone over a bump, come off the bike and broke his neck. The growing wheat hid the body and the bike until the farmer discovered it. Incredibly sad, and such a strange and abrupt accident. There was no underlying condition, no depression, etc, just perhaps a one in a million accident.:(

Not that uncommon to come off your bike and break your neck. There's a case near us when a teenager came hurtling down an offroad ramp and went over the handles bars and hit his chin on the dirt, you know the rest.

The issue is when stopping abruptly you are literally on the ground before you can do anything. Done it myself.
 

Fanari_Lloyd

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Not that uncommon to come off your bike and break your neck. There's a case near us when a teenager came hurtling down an offroad ramp and went over the handles bars and hit his chin on the dirt, you know the rest.

The issue is when stopping abruptly you are literally on the ground before you can do anything. Done it myself.

I’ve done it myself, when younger, luckily without any harm done except scrapes and bruises.

My friend said they reckoned it was instant
 

PeteS

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Not that uncommon to come off your bike and break your neck. There's a case near us when a teenager came hurtling down an offroad ramp and went over the handles bars and hit his chin on the dirt, you know the rest.

The issue is when stopping abruptly you are literally on the ground before you can do anything. Done it myself.
I remember a couple of years ago a case on the local news, where a middle age couple were cycling down a long slope and the wife hit a pothole, came off, cracked her head and died as a result. She wasn't wearing a helmet. The TV company obviously had asked the husband to re enact the ride down the hill and he did so (without coming off obviously). He wasn't wearing a helmet.
I've noticed a large increase in cycling where I live, particularly among older people and the vast majority seem to think that a helmet is not required. I suspect that cycling injuries will have increased markedly over the past year.
 

Naughty_Felid

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I remember a couple of years ago a case on the local news, where a middle age couple were cycling down a long slope and the wife hit a pothole, came off, cracked her head and died as a result. She wasn't wearing a helmet. The TV company obviously had asked the husband to re enact the ride down the hill and he did so (without coming off obviously). He wasn't wearing a helmet.
I've noticed a large increase in cycling where I live, particularly among older people and the vast majority seem to think that a helmet is not required. I suspect that cycling injuries will have increased markedly over the past year.

Not to get into a helmet vs non-helmet debate but cycle helmets only keep you safe from certain types of accidents. Also, they have to be fitted and secured properly. My accident following a night shift, my helmet rode up and over my forehead as the straps were worn and I was too lazy fitting it. I knew it was badly fitted. The result was an almost badly fractured eye-socket.

This is me - I've taught adults cycling skills for years, have ridden thousands of miles in all sorts of countries, on all sorts of bikes. Part of being a cycle skills instructor is knowing how to teach someone to fit a helmet to your noggin.

My own fault.

I think with normal cycling in the UK, in the country where car drivers are actually pretty good it's ok not to wear one. If you are road cycling, urban cycling, or on an Ebike getting up to 30km then it's probably a good idea to wear one.

On the continent, there were a lot more deaths from people switching to e-bikes and they were likely older men. If you ever cycle in Amsterdam or Copenhagen cycling isn't a thing it's just part of getting around. The old dudes thought upgrading to an e-bike would be easier for them and they are completely right but there is an adjustment phase when you switch.

These people don't and have never worn cycle helmets and they are very skilled cyclists. I really enjoyed the abuse they gave to cars - which was totally normal and accepted.

In some countries, speed is not capped at 28kph and you can get up to 45kph which is really fun.
 
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Souleater

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I remember a couple of years ago a case on the local news, where a middle age couple were cycling down a long slope and the wife hit a pothole, came off, cracked her head and died as a result. She wasn't wearing a helmet. The TV company obviously had asked the husband to re enact the ride down the hill and he did so (without coming off obviously). He wasn't wearing a helmet.
I've noticed a large increase in cycling where I live, particularly among older people and the vast majority seem to think that a helmet is not required. I suspect that cycling injuries will have increased markedly over the past year.
Not to get into a helmet vs non-helmet debate but cycle helmets only keep you safe from certain types of accidents. Also, they have to be fitted and secured properly. My accident following a night shift, my helmet rode up and over my forehead as the straps were worn and I was too lazy fitting it. I knew it was badly fitted. The result was an almost badly fractured eye-socket.

This is me - I've taught adults cycling skills for years, have ridden thousands of miles in all sorts of countries, on all sorts of bikes. Part of being a cycle skills instructor is knowing how to teach someone to fit a helmet to your noggin.

My own fault.

I think with normal cycling in the UK, in the country where car drivers are actually pretty good it's ok not to wear one. If you are road cycling, urban cycling, or on an Ebike getting up to 30km then it's probably a good idea to wear one.

On the continent, there were a lot more deaths from people switching to e-bikes and they were likely older men. If you ever cycle in Amsterdam or Copenhagen cycling isn't a thing it's just part of getting around. The old dudes thought upgrading to an e-bike would be easier for them and they are completely right but there is an adjustment phase when you switch.

These people don't and have never worn cycle helmets and they are very skilled cyclists. I really enjoyed the abuse they gave to cars - which was totally normal and accepted.

In some countries, speed is not capped at 28kph and you can get up to 45kph which is really fun.
On the helmet question, there are some experts who suggest wearing a helmet whilst cycling can lead to the wearer taking more risks and therefore making it more dangerous, i personally have been cycling, mainly for transport, for nearly 30 years and have never worn a helmet and have never had a serious spill, a few grazed elbows, knees and palms, but i dont cycle like an idiot either.
 

Naughty_Felid

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On the helmet question, there are some experts who suggest wearing a helmet whilst cycling can lead to the wearer taking more risks and therefore making it more dangerous, i personally have been cycling, mainly for transport, for nearly 30 years and have never worn a helmet and have never had a serious spill, a few grazed elbows, knees and palms, but i dont cycle like an idiot either.

You definitely increase the risk of torsion injuries which result when the fins, vents, etc get stuck on something.

I don't think you take more risks as after awhile you don't really notice it's there. The most useful thing is to hang a mirror on it and lights both back and front.

For me, this is the best use of a helmet and safety is second.
 

Souleater

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You definitely increase the risk of torsion injuries which result when the fins, vents, etc get stuck on something.

I don't think you take more risks as after awhile you don't really notice it's there. The most useful thing is to hang a mirror on it and lights both back and front.

For me, this is the best use of a helmet and safety is second.
It was just from an interview i saw once when there was a big push for making cycle helmets compulsary, it still makes me laugh that in Italy it is a legal requirement to have a helmet whilst riding a scooter, but there is no legal requirement to wear it on your head, this is why you see the Italian kids all riding around with their helmets on their arms.
 

hunck

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This girl gets her own back on van


I have mixed feelings about these sort of incidents - one the one hand my feeling is 'good on ya girl', the van people are cunts & deserve payback, on the other, it could result in these guys treating cyclists even worse in the future with a 'they're all the same' attitude & out for revenge on 'em all..

I dunno - are they likely to change their behaviour as a result, or entrench their already held position?..
 

Souleater

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I have mixed feelings about these sort of incidents - one the one hand my feeling is 'good on ya girl', the van people are cunts & deserve payback, on the other, it could result in these guys treating cyclists even worse in the future with a 'they're all the same' attitude & out for revenge on 'em all..

I dunno - are they likely to change their behaviour as a result, or entrench their already held position?..
I dont think thier attitude could get any worse, but i get what youre saying, it might make them think twice before abusing a 'defenseless' female cyclist again though.
 

cycleboy2

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I have mixed feelings about these sort of incidents - one the one hand my feeling is 'good on ya girl', the van people are cunts & deserve payback, on the other, it could result in these guys treating cyclists even worse in the future with a 'they're all the same' attitude & out for revenge on 'em all..

I dunno - are they likely to change their behaviour as a result, or entrench their already held position?..
I suspect nothing short of being locked up for life would make them change their attitude. Actually, that wouldn't either, but at least they'd be off the streets. What disturbs me in this day and age is that they think that actually voicing their feelings – as opposed to just having those feelings – is any way acceptable. They really are scummy low-lifes and as a lifelong cyclist I can totally understand her reaction – I have chased car drivers for miles to berate them, normally for startlingly stupid overtakes. The fact that I can chase them for miles shows how pointless the overtake was.

The latest stupid - though not dangerous - one was last week. I'm in the middle of the left-hand lane of two lanes, rolling towards a red light about 15 metres further on. A MGIF ('Must Get in Front') driver behind me accelerates frantically past me in the right-hand lane in order to slam to a screeching halt at the red light. I go in front, of course, in the ASL – Advance Stop Line – space. I did the arms-spread 'Why' gesture but no response. Bizarre.
 

escargot

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We enjoyed a tootle around our lovely local lanes today, 20-odd miles.
Bright, sunny, cold, dry.

Here's Techy swigging coffee and hot chocolate like the decadent swine he is.

On a Cheshire bench.jpg
 

ramonmercado

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Sad to see him die in this way.

An adventure athlete who cycled the world and survived falling down a mountain in India has been killed by a bus near his home in northern Israel.

Roei Sadan, known affectionately as "Jinji", was 39 years old. From 2007 to 2011, Mr Sadan cycled across 42 countries on six continents.

He was hit by a United Tours bus while cycling near the entrance to Kibbutz Rosh Hanikra, where he lived, on Wednesday at about 14:30 local time (12:30 GMT). He was admitted to Galilee Medical Center in Nahariya, where he was in a critical condition until he died on Friday, Israeli Hebrew-language media reported.

In 2010, three years into his cycle around the world, Mr Sadan wrote in The Jerusalem Post: "While I cycle across continents, I am not alone. I visit Israeli embassies around the globe, I give lectures at schools and I tell the world about Israel... Some call me the 'ambassador on wheels'."

His route went from northern Alaska down the west coast of North, then Central, then South America. He then cycled from the tip of South Africa up to Ethiopia, and then to Israel for a two-week break. The next leg went across Europe, then across Turkey, then through Uzbekistan and Tajikistan in Central Asia, on to China.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-56368840
 

Souleater

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Sad to see him die in this way.

An adventure athlete who cycled the world and survived falling down a mountain in India has been killed by a bus near his home in northern Israel.

Roei Sadan, known affectionately as "Jinji", was 39 years old. From 2007 to 2011, Mr Sadan cycled across 42 countries on six continents.

He was hit by a United Tours bus while cycling near the entrance to Kibbutz Rosh Hanikra, where he lived, on Wednesday at about 14:30 local time (12:30 GMT). He was admitted to Galilee Medical Center in Nahariya, where he was in a critical condition until he died on Friday, Israeli Hebrew-language media reported.

In 2010, three years into his cycle around the world, Mr Sadan wrote in The Jerusalem Post: "While I cycle across continents, I am not alone. I visit Israeli embassies around the globe, I give lectures at schools and I tell the world about Israel... Some call me the 'ambassador on wheels'."

His route went from northern Alaska down the west coast of North, then Central, then South America. He then cycled from the tip of South Africa up to Ethiopia, and then to Israel for a two-week break. The next leg went across Europe, then across Turkey, then through Uzbekistan and Tajikistan in Central Asia, on to China.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-56368840
This reminds me of the story of the mountaineer who died falling down the stairs

Everest mountaineer Charlotte Fox has died aged 61 following a fall down astaircase at her home in Telluride, Colorado. ... The event was immortalised by the film Everest and a host of books such as Into Thin Air.

https://www.scmp.com/sport/outdoor/...-mountaineer-charlotte-fox-dies-aged-61-after
 

ramonmercado

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From the herstory books.

A bright, sunny morning, fresh and cool; good roads and a dry atmosphere; a beautiful country before you, all your own to see and enjoy; a properly adjusted wheel awaiting you,what more delightful than to mount and speed away, the whirr of the wheels, the soft grit of the tire, an occasional chain-clank the only sounds added to the chorus of the morning, as, the pace attained, the road stretches away before you!

So wrote Maria E. Ward in the first chapter of her book Bicycling for Ladies, published in 1896. The Staten Island native, known to her friends and family as Violet, was a vocal proponent of bicycling as an ideal outdoor sport for women, and her book came on the market precisely at the peak of bicycling’s greatest popularity in the United States.

Teaching women how to ride a bicycle might seem an unusual topic to today’s readers, but bicycling as a widely popular and affordable activity was barely ten years old in 1896. Early versions of the bicycle included the heavy “boneshaker” of the 1860s and the high wheelers of the 1870s and 1880s, but none of the early versions found mass acceptance, and most of those who did use them were men.

Bicycling changed dramatically in 1887 with the introduction of the “safety” bicycle to the United States. Featuring two wheels of equal size, and a chain drive that made riding more efficient, the new bicycle found quick acceptance among both men and women. The addition of pneumatic tires in 1889 gave a smoother ride, and assembly-line production lowered the cost. By the early 1890s, a bicycling craze was sweeping the nation, with millions of Americans enjoying the sport of “wheeling,” as it was sometimes called. ...

https://lithub.com/the-women-who-pioneered-bicycling-as-a-feminist-sport/
 

escargot

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Not sure this is genuine:
Cycling advice for ladies.

Cycling advice for ladies.jpg
 

escargot

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"Bicycle face" has become a bit of a cult thing among modern cycling ladies. :gent: I suggest you get your Bicycle Face on next time you are out cycling with Techy! :chuckle:

Haha, that's definitely me!
url=https://www.vox.com/2014/7/8/588093...re-that-told-women-to-worry-about-bicycle]Vox on 'bicycle face'[/url]

"Over-exertion, the upright position on the wheel, and the unconscious effort to maintain one's balance tend to produce a wearied and exhausted 'bicycle face,'" noted the Literary Digest in 1895.

It went on to describe the condition: "usually flushed, but sometimes pale, often with lips more or less drawn, and the beginning of dark shadows under the eyes, and always with an expression of weariness."

Elsewhere, others said the condition was "characterized by a hard, clenched jaw and bulging eyes."

The article mentions items from the above list too as if it's real.

Anyway, 'Bloomers' weren't baggy undergarments. They were a sort of divided skirt designed by a Mrs Bloomer as a suitable garment for women to wear when bicycling.
 

escargot

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We had a nice ride today.
This is one of our picnic spots, near Oulton Park. It's very quiet these days. :(

Techy decided to wear shorts and only a couple of layers so he nearly froze to death.

I was wrapped up like a Pass the Parcel package. It's only March.


Cold picnic at Oulton Mill Pond .jpg
 
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