Danish Troll Legends

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#31
Swedish, rather than Danish - this is something I mentioned some years ago; in order to avoid repeating myself, I'm going to, erm, repeat myself. From Page 18 of the Suggestions for a Good Read thread:

The Forest of Hours by Kirstin Ekman.

I first became aware of this author through her novel Blackwater - an early action in the current Scandinavian takeover of the crime fiction genre.

The Forest of Hours is an entirely different kettle of fish, but equally excellent.

Skord is a forest troll who becomes infatuated with human beings and their world to such an extent that he leaves the forest in order to join them, becoming indistinguishable from the humans around him to all but a perceptive few. His lifetime extends over several centuries and his career includes banditry, soldiering, alchemy and medicine. Always at heart a creature of the forest, Skord remains a very moral animal when it comes to nature – wincing at the wearing of skins, the spilling of animal blood and the felling of trees - but decidedly more amoral when it comes to his adopted species; the book can be brutal as well as beautiful.

Despite the presence of trolls and giants and magical animals this is decidedly not a fantasy novel in the way that definition would normally be applied, and I wouldn’t class it as magical realism either; it’s really a book about the nature of humanity thrown into relief through being as observed by an outsider, and it’s point of view is pragmatic, practical and earthy rather than in any way surreal or ethereal. The writing style is clear and lucid and the descriptions of the natural world are stunning without being twee or romanticised – possibly the best descriptions of nature that I’ve ever read.

I think it’s out of print at the moment – but it’s well worth the effort of hunting down.
I've no idea how much actual troll-lore Ekman uses, or if the troll motif is just a device, pure and simple. I really enjoyed it and may now have to re-read when I get back home.

Edit: I notice that I misspelled the author's christian name in the original post - it's Kerstin, not Kirstin.
 
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lordmongrove

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#32
Stallo is well worth a look. Its a kind of Scandinavian noir thriller with trolls! Not a million miles away from the excellent Swedish tv series Jordskott. It involves a cryptozoologist, missing children, a dangerous secret group and surviving trolls.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stallo-Stefan-Spjut/dp/0571296785

A haunting supernatural thriller for fans of Let the Right One In, The Passage and Salem's Lot.

'I was enthralled form the very first page . . . the words seems to sparkle on the page.' Karl Ove Knausgaard

In the summer of 1978 a young boy disappears without trace from a summer cabin in the woods. His mother claims that he was abducted by a giant. The boy is never found.

The previous year, over in a Swedish National Park, a wildlife photographer takes a strange picture from his small airplane, of a bear running over the marshes. On its back sits a creature, which the photographer claims is something extraordinary.

Twenty-five years later, and back in Laponia, Susso runs a much-maligned web page, one dedicated to searching for creatures whose existence have not yet been proven: the Yeti, the Loch Ness Monster, Big Foot. But Susso has her own obsession, one inherited from her grandfather, the well-known wildlife photographer.

When an old woman claims that a small creature has been standing outside her house, observing her and her five year old grandson for hours, Susso picks up her camera and leaves for what will become a terrifying adventure into the unknown.
 

lordmongrove

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#33
Another troll related horror Trollnight by Peter Tremayne. A little light on the trolls but they are ok when they finally turn up.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/31575465-trollnight

When American scientist Tony Stevens hears that his sister has been killed in a skiing accident in Oslo, he refuses to believe it. After much investigation, he discovers that whatever killed his sister is now after him.
 
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#35
Jordskott, truly great series. Begins like a police show but takes a dark left turn into folkloric horror...
Thanks for that recommendation. I've been umming and erring about this series for ages - think I'm going to give it a go now.
 

Frideswide

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#40

AlchoPwn

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#42
lol, trolls are an interesting subject
Are you familiar with the notion of the Trollsyn. This apparently refers to people with second sight, but more deeply because they have trollish ancestry. Trollsyn is also possible thru items like the "self drilled stone", which is any found stone that has a natural hole thru it. Apparently animals who behave strangely are exhibiting the Trollsyn. The norse also used to think that anything that comes out of a mist and doesn't last for three days isn't real. This could make them rather uninviting hosts on occasion.
 

Swifty

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#44
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#50
The norse also used to think that anything that comes out of a mist and doesn't last for three days isn't real. This could make them rather uninviting hosts on occasion.
For three days or so anyway :)
It occurred to me that that's a very very Norse approach - it's both wildly superstitious and completely pragmatic - at the same time.
 
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