David Paulides & Missing 411

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
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... When you think about it, doesn't the fact that search and rescue operatives don't go missing more often kind of undermine the 'there's something out there' theory?
I understand what you're saying, but I'm not sure it proves anything.

Generally speaking, the people who go MIA are often inexperienced and / or in unknown locations (including following unspecified routes) alone or in very small numbers.

Search parties are generally experienced, traversing specific areas, working in accordance with a plan known to others, often operating in groups, and often in reasonably close contact with others elsewhere (e.g., via radio).

The missing are often missing because no one else knew enough about their intents and actions to guess where they'd gone. The searchers are better coordinated among themselves and with others.
 

Spookdaddy

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I understand what you're saying, but I'm not sure it proves anything...
No, it doesn't. And you are right about the general inexperience of many of those who go missing - although it's worth pointing out that pundits on the conspiracy side of the argument often emphasise the alleged expertise of the missing ('experienced hunter', 'outdoorsman' etc).

It just struck me that if there was a government covered up alien bigfoot doing the rounds out there then you would think he might have been tempted to take a swipe at the odd rescuer; after all - as the Tim Staples case you linked to above suggests - searchers are not always in large groups, and can themselves become isolated.
 

Kondoru

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Even the experienced have accidents or get lost.

this was stressed in Kepharts book (cant recall the title) written in 1920.

He had spent his life in the woods and he admitted he had been lost, but it wasn't catastrophic as he kept calm.

He relates tragic tales which took place in a wood of just 1000 acres, Its easy to go in a circle
 

marhawkman

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No, it doesn't. And you are right about the general inexperience of many of those who go missing - although it's worth pointing out that pundits on the conspiracy side of the argument often emphasise the alleged expertise of the missing ('experienced hunter', 'outdoorsman' etc).

It just struck me that if there was a government covered up alien bigfoot doing the rounds out there then you would think he might have been tempted to take a swipe at the odd rescuer; after all - as the Tim Staples case you linked to above suggests - searchers are not always in large groups, and can themselves become isolated.
This was one of the main talking points in the Bart Schleyer case. He was a skilled outdoors man who would regularly go hunting alone. Mr. Schleyer had years of experience as a search and rescue worker too! But then one day something happened while he was in the woods, and investigators could only find pieces of his remains. Most of the investigators seem to think he was killed by a bear. There might not be signs of a struggle because, well... He might have fallen asleep while waiting for game and gotten attacked in his sleep :/
 

Stormkhan

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Thing is, while even experts can have accidents or get lost, they have the knowledge and skill sets reduce the chances of accident and - when accidents occur - to improve their chances of survival and rescue.
Expert searchers with local knowledge would also know of 'hot spots' of trouble, where casual visitors or adventurous wannabe explorers usually come a cropper.
 

Yithian

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David Paulides has suffered a personal tragedy.

His son has apparently committed suicide at the age of just twenty-nine.

Whatever you may think of his work, this is horrible news.

 
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