Day Of The Animals: Tales Of Man Vs Beast (And Man Suffers)

michael59

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I've heard of mongoose versus diamond back snake before, I didn't realise squirrels were this hard.
I think they are immune or at least partially immune to snake venom.

While we are on the subject of snakes... Did you know that those old western movies that used to show the trick shot of the cowboy shooting off the head of the snake were not fake? The truth is that the snake actually jumps to attack the bullet that's why it's so easy to shoot them in the head.
 

Swifty

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Crufts 2020 winner, Maisy the Daschund, does her round of honour for the crowd then does a massive poo :)

 

maximus otter

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Did you know that those old western movies that used to show the trick shot of the cowboy shooting off the head of the snake were not fake? The truth is that the snake actually jumps to attack the bullet that's why it's so easy to shoot them in the head.
I’m going to shoot this story down (see what l did there?)

One of the most popular revolvers for self-defence in the cowboy era was the Colt Single Action Army revolver of 1873. lts most common chambering was in .45 Colt. That cartridge launched its bullet at roughly 1,000 feet per second.

A snake can strike 6” in 70 milliseconds. A big rattler might attain a length of 7’, and can strike defensively only to about 2/3rds of its body length.

I can therefore see no reason why anyone would want to waste an expensive cartridge by shooting a snake more than ten feet away, so a bullet from a Colt will strike the snake in less than 1/100th of a second after firing. That’s not enough time for the snake to move its head one inch, even ignoring its reaction time.

So: an entertaining story, but impossible in real life.

maximus otter
 

michael59

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I’m going to shoot this story down (see what l did there?)

One of the most popular revolvers for self-defence in the cowboy era was the Colt Single Action Army revolver of 1873. lts most common chambering was in .45 Colt. That cartridge launched its bullet at roughly 1,000 feet per second.

A snake can strike 6” in 70 milliseconds. A big rattler might attain a length of 7’, and can strike defensively only to about 2/3rds of its body length.

I can therefore see no reason why anyone would want to waste an expensive cartridge by shooting a snake more than ten feet away, so a bullet from a Colt will strike the snake in less than 1/100th of a second after firing. That’s not enough time for the snake to move its head one inch, even ignoring its reaction time.

So: an entertaining story, but impossible in real life.

maximus otter
This story/study says it is true...

They say to kill a rattlesnake, just shoot in its general direction and it’ll intercept the bullet, inadvertently killing itself.

The lunging movements of rattlesnakes and other vipers have been described as “lightning fast” and the “fastest strike on the planet.” The G forces they employ to capture their food would be enough to cause even experienced jet pilots to black out.

Snakes rely on their ultra-quick ability to strike in order to eat and to defend themselves. When necessary, they can hit a target in as little as 50 to 90 milliseconds. For the sake of comparison, a blink of an eye takes 202 milliseconds.

“It’s such a cheesy sentence but it’s literally true: They strike within a blink of an eye,” said David Penning, who studies functional morphology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
https://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-fast-snake-strikes-20160316-story.html
 

maximus otter

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This story/study says it is true...
Au contraire, it doesn't.

Paragraph A: It quotes the old wives' tale. Cut.

Paragraph B: It says that snakes strike fast. At no point does it say "...fast enough to intercept a bullet".

maximus otter
 

michael59

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Au contraire, it doesn't.

Paragraph A: It quotes the old wives' tale. Cut.

Paragraph B: It says that snakes strike fast. At no point does it say "...fast enough to intercept a bullet".

maximus otter
Okay.

I certainly don't want to see a study done on it. That would mean a lot of dead snakes for very little reason.

I do have to admit that I have seen it done. The snake has to be poised and ready to strike. The gun was within 10 feet of the snake when it fired. I don't remember what kind of gun was used except that it was a hand gun. I was 12 years old at the time.
 

maximus otter

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I certainly don't want to see a study done on it. That would mean a lot of dead snakes for very little reason.
I agree entirely. Leave them alone and they'll leave you alone. I was amused to see that a hugely disproportionate number of rattler "victims" are drunk young males who were hunting rattlesnakes...

I can remember many years ago reading an account of some moron who went out for a stroll on a sunny heath in Britain in Victorian times, and was delighted to recount how many adders he had killed with his walking stick as they warmed themselves harmlessly in the sun. Twat.

maximus otter
 

michael59

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I agree entirely. Leave them alone and they'll leave you alone. I was amused to see that a hugely disproportionate number of rattler "victims" are drunk young males who were hunting rattlesnakes...

I can remember many years ago reading an account of some moron who went out for a stroll on a sunny heath in Britain in Victorian times, and was delighted to recount how many adders he had killed with his walking stick as they warmed themselves harmlessly in the sun. Twat.

maximus otter
It was different back then, Maximus otter. Even when I think of the way we used to obedience train our dogs. It was brutal. We hit them when they got it wrong we isolated them when they disobeyed.

I remember this one woman who actually had a class that people payed to attend and this one lady could not get her dog to heal. The teacher/trainer took the dog, waked and said heal, when it didn't she took the lead/leash up onto her shoulder and pulled it until the dog was hanging and actually choking to death. She counted to 10 and let the dog down, looked him straight in the eyes and said, heal. He obeyed. :( My foster mother told us that story and she laughed as she recounted it.

I remember too many nightmarish tales about how animals were treated. People too.
 

Lord Lucan

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I've heard of mongoose versus diamond back snake before, I didn't realise squirrels were this hard.
Decades ago I saw a mongoose vs cobra fight in Thailand. The mongoose was lightning fast and dispatched the snake in no time at all.
 

ramonmercado

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What calibre pistol did it use?

maximus otter
The Korth Mongoose is a revolver offered in 3”, 4”, 5.25”, or 6” barrel configurations. Chambered in .357 Magnum/ .38 Special, the cylinder holds six rounds of ammunition. It is also available with a unique interchangeable cylinder system that allows for .357 Magnum/.38 Special and 9mm, to be interchanged in a flash. The Mongoose provides a level of versatility not seen in any other revolver on the market. This is a revolver that harkens back to the days when a revolver was a hand-built piece of functioning art. The frame and all parts are fully machined from the finest billet steel available. The trigger face is high polished and the smooth action is something that will make a lasting impression to even the most experienced competition revolver shooter. Standard with black DLC finish, the superior craftsmanship and material are clearly evident.


https://www.nighthawkcustom.com/mongoose-357
 

Kondoru

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Oh! Maxiumus Otter, that is sad.

As a child I was treated to the delight of seeing an animal lover (meaning cute and fluffy) chop up a slowworm I had innocently found them to see.
 

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Oh! Maxiumus Otter, that is sad.

As a child I was treated to the delight of seeing an animal lover (meaning cute and fluffy) chop up a slowworm I had innocently found them to see.
Not an animal lover if they did that.

Edit: Hmmm. Aren't they a protected species? Really rare? A person could be prosecuted for that, these days.
 

IbisNibs

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From the same site, here's a heartwarming story of Odin the dog who was left behind in when his owner had to evacuate pronto in the California wildfires in 2017.

As the raging California wildfires encroached upon Roland Handel's home, he had to make a split-second decision — try to force his dog Odin into the car, or leave him behind.

Odin is one of two great Pyrenees who take turns guarding the family's eight goats from coyotes and mountain lions, and he was on duty the night the fires broke out.

"At night, Odin won't leave the goats," Handel told As It Happens host Carol Off. "When I approached, he sat down in front of the goats, and I know that look. He wasn't moving."

With flames racing towards his property, he said there was no time to load the goats into a trailer.

"By the time we were going down the road, you could hear the twisting metal of transmission towers falling and propane tanks exploding," Handel said. "I'll never forget it."

He returned the next day, circumventing roadblocks to get there.

He discovered that his home and everything else on his property was completely destroyed.

Except for Odin, who was there waiting for him — with all eight goats.

Odin ran up to him and showered him with kisses, he said. The dogs paw pads were burnt and his bright white fur was singed orange.

"He looked small and he was limping. He was lying down a lot. He was clearly exhausted."

A group of deer had gathered with Odin and the goats, Handel said, perhaps also taking advantage of the brave pooch's protection. The deer scattered when Handel approached.

He believes the dog led the other animals to a clearing at the centre of a high outcropping of rocks to avoid contact with the flames.
 

michael59

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From the same site, here's a heartwarming story of Odin the dog who was left behind in when his owner had to evacuate pronto in the California wildfires in 2017.

As the raging California wildfires encroached upon Roland Handel's home, he had to make a split-second decision — try to force his dog Odin into the car, or leave him behind.

Odin is one of two great Pyrenees who take turns guarding the family's eight goats from coyotes and mountain lions, and he was on duty the night the fires broke out.



That made me cry. :violin:
 
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