Dinosaurs: New Findings & Theories

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
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Here are the bibliographic details and abstract from the Australian carnosaur report ...

Footprints of large theropod dinosaurs in the Middle–UpperJurassic (lower Callovian–lower Tithonian) Walloon Coal Measures of southern Queensland, Australia.

Anthony Romilio, Steven W. Salisbury & Andréas Jannel
Published online: 12 Jun 2020
https://doi.org/10.1080/08912963.2020.1772252

ABSTRACT
Dinosaur tracks associated with coal-mines of the Middle to Upper Jurassic (Callovian–Tithonian) Walloon Coal Measures (Clarence–Morton Basin) have been reported on more than any other track-bearing formation in Australia, yet due to the brevity of ichnological information, remain poorly known. All these tracks were found in sediments directly above coal seams in the ceilings of subterranean mines. This style of mining ceased more than a quarter of a century ago, and with many of the original mines having been back-filled or closed, ichnological investigations are restricted to the study of museum specimens and archival photographs. Here, we consolidate data from the literature, present previously unpublished archival photographs, and show the 3D topography of all accessioned track specimens from the Walloon Coal Measures. We recognise eleven track-bearing sites, most of which produced large (length of 30–50 cm) and very large (length greater than 50 cm) sized theropod tracks, including Australia’s largest carnivorous dinosaur footprint (79 cm long). The domination of theropod tracks is unique among Australian dinosaur tracksites. In light of the absence of near coveal body-fossil candidates, the Walloon Coal Measures ichnofaunal assemblages fills significant gaps in our understanding of Australia's Jurassic dinosaur fauna.

SOURCE: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08912963.2020.1772252
 

ramonmercado

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This falls fowl of previous theories.

Dinosaurs that lived around 200 million years ago may have moved in a way similar to guineafowls, despite having long and muscular tails, scientists believe.

Their research is based on an analysis of fossilised footprints of theropods, or three-toed dinosaurs, from the Early Jurassic period alongside the foot impressions of helmeted guineafowls. The scientists believe their findings, published in the journal Biology Letters, offers a new way of studying ancient footprints.

Study author Dr Peter Falkingham, senior lecturer in vertebrate biology at Liverpool John Moores University, said: “Dinosaurs were moving in very similar ways to modern birds even 200 million years ago, many millions of years before birds evolved, even though they were quite different (long, muscular tails).”

https://www.irishexaminer.com/break...may-have-walked-like-guineafowls-1008511.html
 
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