Dog-headed men explained!!!

A

Anonymous

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#1
If you'll all kindly go to the news story "Ice Age faces!" listed today on the Fortean Times home page, you'll be forwarded to a BBC News article pertaining to some striking images that can be dated back millenia. There, you'll see that one of the images featured on the article can be clicked to reveal an "enlarged" version (although actually it isn't an enlarged version but a different, much larger image, but that's beside the point). Clicking this reveals a seeming gallery of some of the borderlines for human morphology. A few of these faces, especially the one shown at the screen's top left, look very much like the "dog-headed men" reported sporadically in old and modern times.
Signifcantly, there is a condition that causes the limitless growth of every hair on the body. Some of you are likely aware of this. Taking individuals who have faces like those depicted in those cave illustrations and giving them that hair condition results in dog-headed men.
 

hachihyaku

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#2
But the dog-headed men in the stories here had Doberman-like heads, which have slick, short hair, not heavy, curly hair like disorders can cause.

Foiled again! ^_^
 
A

Anonymous

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#3
I think the idea that babboons could have given the idea of werewolfs sounds interesting.

BTW welcome back Joshua
 

many_angled_one

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#4
Baboons? Hrmmm cant see that one workign personally.

A much better "explanation" would be men in olden days wearing nice warm wolf-pelts with the head skin still attached, to maybe scare off their enemies or just as a convenient hood/mask!
 
A

Anonymous

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#5
It was just some side remark I saw somewhere. But imagine those giant babboons are still alive. And you were down in africa when you saw something that was big and hairy, had a snout with big fangs, but hands like a human. If I didn't know better I'd have guessed at half man half wolf.
 

rynner2

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#6
Currently on iPlayer, as part of the Attenborough-fest, is this offering:
Zoo Quest - Zoo Quest to Madagascar: Episode 5

First transmitted in 1961, David Attenborough comes to the end of his expedition having travelled thousands of miles throughout the island of Madagascar.
The principle objective of the expedition is to film and observe the rarest animals of the island and the search continues in the depths of the Madagascan forest.

Geckoes, millipedes and paradise flycatchers are among the animals encountered as Attenborough searches for one of the most legendary animals of Madagascar, the indri. Indris are the largest of all the lemurs and are the creature some believe to be the origin of the "dog-headed man" legend, as recounted by Marco Polo.

Extremely shy animals, only Attenborough's recordings of their weird, deafening wails can entice a family out of hiding, so providing a unique glimpse of these previously unseen primates.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p00db26j/zoo-quest-zoo-quest-to-madagascar-episode-5

Who knows? Could this have been one of the sources of the legend? Decide for yourself!
 

PeteByrdie

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#7
Currently on iPlayer, as part of the Attenborough-fest, is this offering:
Zoo Quest - Zoo Quest to Madagascar: Episode 5

First transmitted in 1961, David Attenborough comes to the end of his expedition having travelled thousands of miles throughout the island of Madagascar.
The principle objective of the expedition is to film and observe the rarest animals of the island and the search continues in the depths of the Madagascan forest.

Geckoes, millipedes and paradise flycatchers are among the animals encountered as Attenborough searches for one of the most legendary animals of Madagascar, the indri. Indris are the largest of all the lemurs and are the creature some believe to be the origin of the "dog-headed man" legend, as recounted by Marco Polo.

Extremely shy animals, only Attenborough's recordings of their weird, deafening wails can entice a family out of hiding, so providing a unique glimpse of these previously unseen primates.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p00db26j/zoo-quest-zoo-quest-to-madagascar-episode-5

Who knows? Could this have been one of the sources of the legend? Decide for yourself!
Sir David returned to Madagascar years later with an ex-indri hunter called Joseph who now seems to be involved in conservation. He's the guy who usually takes BBC presenters to see indri. I've got several documentaries in which he appears on disk. They get up and close to these shy animals now, and Joseph, who once hunted these animals for bushmeat, now strokes them. I think the documentary is David Attenborough and the Giant Egg, and it includes several pieces of footage from the Zoo Quest programme.
 
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