Dyatlov Pass Incident

EnolaGaia

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what the red `F‘s indicate
The "F" annotations were added by the Russian site that hosted the modified photo labeling the 4 bodies. (No - I don't have the site address at hand; I may have cited it years ago earlier in this thread.)

That particular site emphasized comments from the later (May 1959) search / recovery party that there was evidence of a substantial snow-slide at the den / ravine site. This alleged snow-slide flowed from left to right (down into the ravine / gulley) as viewed in the first (scene overview) photo I posted above. The "F" annotated arrows were added to illustrate the snow-slide's direction of flow.

This purported snow-slide could have occurred anytime during the 2 - 3 months between the incident and the discovery of the den / ravine site.
 

AlchoPwn

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They weren't found in the snow den / cave.

Here's the evidence from the search / recovery party that discovered the den and ravine scene over 2 months later, excavated it, and recovered the bodies.

First - here's the search party photo illustrating the den / ravine locale as excavated.

This image is subject to some interpretation. When I look at it, I see a snow cave that the 4 bodies in the brook were likely using as their entrance point. It is frantically unlikely that anyone would simply dig directly down into the snow to build a snow cave, as that creates all sorts of problems and impracticalities. It simply isn't how it is done, unless there are no embankments to use, and little alternative, as one would wind up effectively digging oneself not so much a snow cave as a hole, with the distinct possibility of being buried in it. The far more normal procedure is to start on the side of a slope or embankment, and to dig in, in much the way one would expect a cave to be formed on the side of a cliff in nature. The subsequent photos clearly demonstrate that there was more than enough snow to crush and bury everyone. What none of the photos show, but I have seen elsewhere is the disposition of the bodies, with one of the woman crushed and buried half-way into the entrance on at the embankment near the brook.
 

EnolaGaia

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What none of the photos show, but I have seen elsewhere is the disposition of the bodies, with one of the woman crushed and buried half-way into the entrance on at the embankment near the brook.
The 3rd and 4th photos I posted earlier today ARE the photos of the four bodies' disposition - in situ down in the stream bed, as found.
 

EnolaGaia

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An interesting - if somewhat cursory and occasionally inaccurate - retelling of the basic story.

For the record ... A number of the photos included in this presentation are not photos from the doomed trip. This wasn't the first such trek that Dyatlov had organized and led, and some of the photos are definitely from the earlier trips.

The most interesting photo in this presentation is one I've never seen before - the photo of 3 guys and the tent in a rolled-up condition being either spread out or packed atop a set of skis. Here's the photo:

Tent-Rolled-on-Skis-SMALL.jpg

This illustrates how the tent was deployed atop the trekkers' skis so as to provide a sort of foundation for the floor. In the last clear photo on the doomed party's recovered film(s) the trekkers are digging a pit into which the tent will be erected, and all their skis are vertically arranged in the snow. This photo shows how the skis were subsequently deployed in erecting the tent. It also shows where their skis were at the time they left the tent.

I'm confident this photo is not from the fatal 1959 trip, because:

(1) I cannot definitively match any of the 3 guys in this photo with a 1959 trekker at the time of the last camp preparation.

(2) I believe the rightmost person is the same (clothing and face) as someone shown in a group photo from one of Dyatlov's earlier expeditions.

(3) This photo does not appear on any of the contact sheets from the recovered 1959 film rolls.

(4) The final day's tent pit digging was done under blowing snow conditions and failing light. This photo shows no active snowing conditions and daylight. It cannot be a photo of the tent being laid out at the end of the final day (in which they arrived atop the pass) after they'd finished digging out a place for it.
 
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