Earliest Known Cave Art Found In Indonesia

Comfortably Numb

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
8,979
Location
Phone
Earliest known cave art by modern humans found in Indonesia

Source: The Guardian online
Date: 11 December, 2019

Cave art depicting human-animal hybrid figures hunting warty pigs and dwarf buffaloes has been dated to nearly 44,000 years old, making it the earliest known cave art by our species.

The artwork in Indonesia is nearly twice as old as any previous hunting scene and provides unprecedented insights into the earliest storytelling and the emergence of modern human cognition.

Previously, images of this level of sophistication dated to about 20,000 years ago, with the oldest cave paintings believed to be more basic creations such as handprints.

Previously, images of this level of sophistication dated to about 20,000 years ago, with the oldest cave paintings believed to be more basic creations such as handprints.

https://amp.theguardian.com/science...-cave-art-by-modern-humans-found-in-indonesia


Perhaps we would expect a relatively primitive depiction of animals?

Is this artwork absolutely incredible in its precision?
 

Tempest63

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
Messages
2,435
Previously, images of this level of sophistication dated to about 20,000 years ago, with the oldest cave paintings believed to be more basic creations such as handprints.

It’s probably on a par with the graffiti the Neanderthals scribble all over our site toilet walls.
 

Comfortably Numb

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
8,979
Location
Phone
A compellation of some images online...

Screenshot_20191212_232506_compress42.jpg


Screenshot_20191212_233214_compress68.jpg


Screenshot_20191212_233254_compress23.jpg


Screenshot_20191212_233359_compress39.jpg


Screenshot_20191212_232354_compress92.jpg
 

Comfortably Numb

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
8,979
Location
Phone
Incidentally, you can zoom into all of above images.

Profoundly recommended - the detail is exquisite.
 

skinny

Den Trassis
Joined
May 30, 2010
Messages
8,256
Location
Spandex V
Outstanding!!
This is important. It means the long-lived eurocentrist bias in history and the archaeological arts hasn't a leg to stand on. We are all creative, nuanced and sophisticated societies in our own way. Except for, perhaps, the Cromergnions.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
28,363
Location
Out of Bounds
There are multiple cave art sites in Indonesia, and recent research indicates they are all deteriorating. The most obvious cause concerns climate / weather trends affecting the rock upon which the art was painted. However, there are other hypothetical causes which may better explain the trend at one or another specific site.
World’s Oldest Cave Paintings Are Fading—Climate Change May Be to Blame

Repeated shifts between wet and dry conditions boost the growth of salt crystals that destabilize the rock canvas.

Some of the oldest art in human history is disintegrating, scientists say. And climate change may be hastening its demise.

New research reports that ancient rock art in Indonesian caves is degrading over time, as bits of rock slowly flake away from the walls. It's a tremendous loss for human history — some of these paintings, which depict everything from animals to human figures to abstract symbols, date back about 40,000 years.

Salt crystals building up on the walls are a key part of the problem, the study suggests. These salt deposits seep into the cave walls, then proceed to expand and contract as temperatures rise and fall. This process causes the rock to slowly disintegrate. ...

Changes in the weather may be helping the process along, scientists say. ...

The new study, led by Jillian Huntley at Australia's Griffith University, examined 11 ancient cave art sites in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. The researchers found evidence of salt formation at all 11 sites. At three of the sites, they found the types of crystals that most notoriously cause rocks to break apart. ...

It's a small sample; there are more than 300 known cave art sites scattered around the region. But the research suggests that salt crystals may indeed be part of the problem. ...

Scientists have proposed multiple theories about what might be causing it. Along with climate change, they've suggested that pollution and other disturbances from nearby limestone mining operations might be degrading the fragile paintings. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.scientificamerican.com/...gs-are-fading-climate-change-may-be-to-blame/
 

Nosmo King

I'm not a cat
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
7,547
Cave painting on the Indonesian Island of Sulawesi are being destroyed by rising temperatures.

"Indonesian rock art is decaying at an alarming rate due to the effects of climate change, researchers said.

This includes a picture of a wild pig drawn 45,500 years ago on the island of Sulawesi - said to be the world's oldest animal cave painting.

Other cave motifs in the region depicting hunting scenes and supernatural beings have also crumbled faster as temperatures increase.

The findings signal that more needs to be done to preserve the priceless art."

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-57166995
 
Top