Environmental Issues

kesavaross

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Oct 18, 2015
Messages
505
Location
Brighton, UK
I cannot believe any country allly or foe would take such a risk with a nuclear power station.

There is no benefit to either side. It makes no sense.
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
2,739
Location
Earth
It has been reported that Russia wants to connect Crimea to the electric grid by taking away power from the cooling units.

Ukraine worrying about a meltdown is trying to stock up on potassium iodide tablets.
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
2,739
Location
Earth
London is running out of water from the drought and London loses 25% of their water through leaks.

London has a plan to take water from Lake Vyrnwy in Powys, Wales through the Severn and Cotswold Canals and the Sapperton Tunnel.

Wales is not exactly agreeing to this water loss to London.
 

Bad Bungle

Tutti but not Frutti.
Joined
Oct 13, 2018
Messages
3,830
Location
The Chilterns
London is running out of water from the drought and London loses 25% of their water through leaks.

London has a plan to take water from Lake Vyrnwy in Powys, Wales through the Severn and Cotswold Canals and the Sapperton Tunnel.

Wales is not exactly agreeing to this water loss to London.
Wales is still moaning over plans to tarmac it over and turn into a car park.
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
2,739
Location
Earth
It has been reported that thousands of people are fleeing the area around the Ukraine nuclear power plant as indiscriminate shelling is constant.

A nuclear accident will be catastrophic.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
48,153
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
It has been reported that thousands of people are fleeing the area around the Ukraine nuclear power plant as indiscriminate shelling is constant.

A nuclear accident will be catastrophic.
It's odd that the Russians don't seem to acknowledge that there will be consequences for them as well as Ukraine.
Almost as if the Russian leadership does not care, or is not fully in charge.
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
2,739
Location
Earth
The world is holding their breath as Russia has told their nuclear plant works not come to work on Friday to the Ukrainian nuclear plant.

Is Russia creating a false flag ?
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
2,739
Location
Earth
According to BBC news President Zelensky of the Ukraine says the world today was seconds away from a nuclear disaster.

Not knowing who started a fire at the nuclear plant, but the power went out that ran the cooling systems for plant.

Just in time, the back up generators came on and started to cool the plant.

President Zelensky claims the cooling water is still too warm.

So, my question is if a nuclear cloud is released, what direction would the radiation go ?
 

Floyd1

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
4,015
London is running out of water from the drought and London loses 25% of their water through leaks.

London has a plan to take water from Lake Vyrnwy in Powys, Wales through the Severn and Cotswold Canals and the Sapperton Tunnel.

Wales is not exactly agreeing to this water loss to London.
Lake Vyrnwy was originally built to supply Liverpool and as far as I know Wales has never benefited from any water from it anyway.
 

Tunn11

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Nov 23, 2005
Messages
941
Location
Under the highest tree top in Kent
London is running out of water from the drought and London loses 25% of their water through leaks.

London has a plan to take water from Lake Vyrnwy in Powys, Wales through the Severn and Cotswold Canals and the Sapperton Tunnel.

Wales is not exactly agreeing to this water loss to London.
I sent comments to Thames Water regarding the hosepipe temporary use ban. I asked why it took three months to respond to minor leaks and why the de salination plant was being maintained at what was obviously the busiest part of the year.
Parts of their answer below, which just repeats the propaganda message and, as usual with these organisations doesn't answer the questions. (My comments in Bold)

"Due to the current heatwave in the UK and the extreme temperature changes, we are experiencing a winter-like summer (?!!?) where leaks have increased to an all-time high during the summer season. As a business we are repairing 1100 leaks each week, We prioritize work to ensure we focus on the bigger leaks first and those which are affecting our customer’s supply of water. We have 160 repair teams working around the clock to fix leaks with activity taking place 7 days a week as well as 280 leak detection engineers working mainly at night to detect leaks not yet appearing at ground level. (But not responding to reported leaks for three months?) So during the usage ban, we need to work together to help manage the effects currently happening around our network. (We'll carry on as normal, you turn your hose off or we'll fine you)

Our Gateway Water Treatment Works (WTW), more commonly known as the desalination plant in Beckton, was completed in 2010 to support our network during prolonged dry weather events,
(But it isn't)rather than for day-to-day use on our network.

Our Gateway WTW has the capacity to deliver up to 100 million litres of water per day
(Agreed, zero is up to 100 million) and we’ve recently carried out maintenance work on areas of the plant to test it thoroughly. Sadly, we’ve found that further investment (Like the electricity needed to run it which is rather expensive at the moment?) is needed to be able to use the WTW, and so we’re working hard to ensure the required upgrades and maintenance is completed as quickly as possible." (Should have spent the money on fixing the leaks and had words with whoever paid for/built the thing)

It's tempting to write back but it'll only be passed to some poor blighter, told to trot out the same rehearsed excuses. The only positive is that they aren't responsible for gas pipes. :)
 

charliebrown

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
2,739
Location
Earth
Russia is calling up 137,000 troops to attack Ukraine.

If the nuclear plant explodes, it will not be fixed during this war.

Will the radioactive clouds come to Europe ?

Is there enough potassium iodide for Europe to take ?

This could be a disaster of enormous proportions !
 

Coal

The Ultimate Skepticus
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
9,353
I sent comments to Thames Water regarding the hosepipe temporary use ban. I asked why it took three months to respond to minor leaks and why the de salination plant was being maintained at what was obviously the busiest part of the year.
Parts of their answer below, which just repeats the propaganda message and, as usual with these organisations doesn't answer the questions. (My comments in Bold)

"Due to the current heatwave in the UK and the extreme temperature changes, we are experiencing a winter-like summer (?!!?) where leaks have increased to an all-time high during the summer season. As a business we are repairing 1100 leaks each week, We prioritize work to ensure we focus on the bigger leaks first and those which are affecting our customer’s supply of water. We have 160 repair teams working around the clock to fix leaks with activity taking place 7 days a week as well as 280 leak detection engineers working mainly at night to detect leaks not yet appearing at ground level. (But not responding to reported leaks for three months?) So during the usage ban, we need to work together to help manage the effects currently happening around our network. (We'll carry on as normal, you turn your hose off or we'll fine you)

Our Gateway Water Treatment Works (WTW), more commonly known as the desalination plant in Beckton, was completed in 2010 to support our network during prolonged dry weather events, (But it isn't)rather than for day-to-day use on our network.

Our Gateway WTW has the capacity to deliver up to 100 million litres of water per day
(Agreed, zero is up to 100 million) and we’ve recently carried out maintenance work on areas of the plant to test it thoroughly. Sadly, we’ve found that further investment (Like the electricity needed to run it which is rather expensive at the moment?) is needed to be able to use the WTW, and so we’re working hard to ensure the required upgrades and maintenance is completed as quickly as possible." (Should have spent the money on fixing the leaks and had words with whoever paid for/built the thing)

It's tempting to write back but it'll only be passed to some poor blighter, told to trot out the same rehearsed excuses. The only positive is that they aren't responsible for gas pipes. :)
They're annoying but remember that fixing leaks and targets for them, along with sewage discharge etc, are directly set by the government and most water companies fix what they're obliged to fix as they go along. If the gov. mandated smaller leak figures, they'd go down...likewise with sewage discharges, they could be excised completely as allowable by the government.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
54,458
Location
Eblana
Another protector of the environment vanishes, possibly murdered.

Keith Davis disappeared at sea thousands of miles from home. His body has never been found. Now the mystery of his death has shone a light on a maritime world that is largely hidden from view, writes Rachel Monroe.

At my local grocery store in Texas, I can buy a can of tuna for less than a dollar. But, like many things that seem inexpensive, those low prices are only possible because of dangerous and largely invisible work happening far away - work that most of us will never know about.

Davis, an idealistic and adventure-loving ukulele player from Arizona, worked to make the invisible world of commercial tuna fishing visible. And he may have paid a price for it.

"He was very impulsive, very romantic, fly by the seat of his pants," said Anik Clemens, his friend and colleague. "He was so passionate about what he did. He wanted to protect the oceans, he wanted to protect the fishermen and their industry."

In 2015, in the midst of a seemingly routine voyage on the Victoria 168, part of a tuna fleet owned by a Taiwanese conglomerate, the 41-year-old vanished hundreds of miles off the coast of Ecuador. The crew searched the ship, but found no sign of him. As word of his disappearance trickled back to his friends and colleagues on the mainland, many were instantly suspicious.

"He had 16 years of service. And there was no question in my mind that he was as professional and as careful and safe as anyone could be," said Bubba Cook, Davis's friend and the Western and Central Pacific Tuna Programme Manager for the World Wildlife Fund. "The inevitable conclusion is that something had to have happened to him. To this day, I'm convinced that he saw something that the people that were on that vessel didn't want him to see."

Looking into his disappearance for new BBC podcast Lost At Sea led me into a fascinating world.

Davis was a marine biologist who worked as a fisheries observer, a little-known profession that offers both great adventure and, in some cases, great risk. The estimated 2,500 observers are our eyes and ears on the oceans. They live on board fishing vessels for months at a time, venturing hundreds of miles offshore to protect those waters from overfishing, and to collect scientific observations that help us understand the health of our oceans and marine life.

Observers live among the crew, working the same gruelling hours in the same harsh conditions. But they are also sometimes viewed with suspicion, because part of their job is reporting illegal activity. ...

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-62603911
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
54,458
Location
Eblana
The slaughter of indigenous and environmental activists continues.

An environmental activist has been killed every two days on average over the past decade, a new study shows.

The report from Global Witness says that more than 1,700 people have died while trying to prevent mining, oil drilling or logging on their lands.

Over the 10 years, Brazil and Colombia have recorded the highest numbers of deaths.

Researchers say the figures underestimate the true scale of violence.

Earlier this year, the murders of British journalist Dom Phillips and a local indigenous expert, Bruno Pereira, brought global attention to the lawless conditions prevailing in some parts of the Amazon.

In this latest report from Global Witness, Latin America is very much the frontline when it comes to deadly attacks on environmental campaigners and activists. The study finds that 68% of the murders took place across this continent, with Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Honduras recording the highest totals.

Many of those who died were indigenous people, often involved in struggles to prevent the exploitation of their lands by mining, oil, logging or hydropower developers.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-63064471
 
Top