Explain Your Wristwatch

Lord Lucan

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Feb 17, 2017
Messages
3,764
Reaction score
10,869
Points
209
It looks a little Steam-punkish but not in an over the top way. It makes me think if aviation by balloon, the dawn of a new age etc. I can see Day and Date, does it tell you the month also?

No month, only day and date.
 

Spookdaddy

Cuckoo
Joined
May 24, 2006
Messages
7,068
Reaction score
9,466
Points
314
Location
Midwich
I have a couple of these - a Seiko Chronograph SND57P1: one for work, one for smart. A nice, robust watch, with a relatively straightforward design.

20191004_182805.jpg


For those not familiar with them, I'd recommend the NATO style strap - especially for work watches, or ones worn doing sports and that sort of thing. Most of the issues I've had with watches in the past have started with a spring bar failing, and the watch falling onto the floor as a consequence. NATO style straps are one continuous strip that thread behind the bar, rather than attach to it - this takes some of the strain off the bars and means that even if one does fail the watch will still be attached to the strap by the other, and will not fall off your wrist. They are also cheap as chips, and I've never had one fail. (ZULU straps are similar, but are of thicker material, and can be a bit more problematic to fit.)


20191004_182928.jpg
 
Last edited:

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
36,041
Reaction score
50,744
Points
334
Location
HM The Tower of London
For those not familiar with them, I'd recommend the NATO style strap - especially for work watches, or ones worn doing sports and that sort of thing. Most of the issues I've had with watches in the past have started with a spring bar failing, and the watch falling onto the floor as a consequence. NATO style straps are one continuous strip that thread behind the bar, rather than attach to it - this takes some of the starin off the bars and means that even if one does fail the watch will still be attached to the other and will not fall off your wrist.

I sometimes make those, occasionally with nice decorative tape added and always with a Velcro fastening. Never had any trouble with them.
 

Xanatic*

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
4,743
Reaction score
5,486
Points
214
Being just a poor boy, I can't afford those fancy metal watches people have. Instead I recently bought a wristwatch, which is wooden and mechanical, the way nature intended it.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
46,592
Reaction score
41,426
Points
334
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Being just a poor boy, I can't afford those fancy metal watches people have. Instead I recently bought a wristwatch, which is wooden and mechanical, the way nature intended it.
So you bought a really expensive watch?
 

Xanatic*

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
4,743
Reaction score
5,486
Points
214
200 pounds, made from walnut wood. You'd probably pay more for a smartwatch.
 

Cochise

Priest of the cult of the Dog with the Broken Paw
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
7,241
Reaction score
11,077
Points
299
I've never understood the fascination with wristwatches. I have a Sekonda, 10 years old, cost less than 30 quid. it tells the time. I don't need it to do anything else.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
31,845
Reaction score
50,819
Points
289
The coolest/oddest watch I've ever owned was inflatable. It was like wrapping a small lilo around your wrist and I'd never seen one like it before or since. I bought it in Magaluf about 25 years ago for around 30 euros, the watch face was digital but it was contained in a soft rubber air pocket, the strap was also air pockets and the whole thing was bright white. It was very futuristic.

I'd gone on the holiday with a nurse and her mate, the watch was also water proof so I could swim in it and when we returned to work in England I was able to show it off to our ward Sister to get permission to wear it with my uniform. Most people will be aware that the reason most hospital staff don't/aren't allowed to wear wrist watches is so we don't scratch patients when moving or handling them .. my 'bubble watch' was soft enough to not provide a threat to a patient's skin but also not be a germ carrier because I could wash it easily when I was washing my hands on the ward.

I've just tried to find a picture of it or something similar using a google image search and have strangely drawn a complete blank. Perhaps only one company only made one line of them ever? .. I know I'm not imagining things.
 

AnonyJ

Captainess Sensible
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Messages
1,496
Reaction score
4,897
Points
164
Location
Having-a-nice-cup-of-tea-and-a-sit-down-shire
My watch is a ladies' Avia bog-standard with a mother-of-pearl face. It was given to me on my 21st birthday as a gift from my maternal grandmother & my auntie who together bought it for me from somewhere like Argos.

It's almost 29 years old and on its 5th or 6th strap and umpteenth battery. The glass is scratched, gold plate is wearing away but I wear it several times a week and will do until/if it ever breaks. It is very precious to me and I never take it on holiday (I take my 'posh' teeny tiny girly gold watch as that is much more replaceable).

IMG_4010.JPG
 
Last edited:

Xanatic*

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
4,743
Reaction score
5,486
Points
214
Sure, you can get a cheap Casio. However I appreciate the engineering in a mechanical watch and I like owning things that are unusual.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
31,845
Reaction score
50,819
Points
289
Last edited:

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
46,592
Reaction score
41,426
Points
334
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Sure, you can get a cheap Casio. However I appreciate the engineering in a mechanical watch and I like owning things that are unusual.
It does sound like a beautiful thing. My Dad would have appreciated that, he loved anything made of wood.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

I tried to warn you...
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
3,159
Reaction score
6,701
Points
204
It has a clear circle and two circles show in it, one is solid the other is empty, solid one is hours the other is mins

I'd never get the hang of that! I am completely and utterly incapable of reading a clock that doesn't have numbers on it. I simply can't.

That watch is a nice shade of blue though.



As for watches in the Zebra household; I don't wear one (just don't like the feeling of it on my wrist, somehow) and Mr Zebra has a digital / analogue combo watch that he's had since the late 1980s, it still works 'cept it needs a new battery.
 

gordonrutter

Within reason
Staff member
Joined
Aug 3, 2001
Messages
5,878
Reaction score
9,671
Points
334
I'd never get the hang of that! I am completely and utterly incapable of reading a clock that doesn't have numbers on it. I simply can't.

That watch is a nice shade of blue though.



As for watches in the Zebra household; I don't wear one (just don't like the feeling of it on my wrist, somehow) and Mr Zebra has a digital / analogue combo watch that he's had since the late 1980s, it still works 'cept it needs a new battery.
I’d be thinking it was some sort of screensaver or something and be constantly tapping it to try to get it show me the actual time!
 

hunck

Antediluvian
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,691
Reaction score
10,578
Points
299
Location
Hobbs End
I never wear a watch but I kinda like this as long as you don’t need to know the exact minute, second, date, phase of the moon, day, altitude, barometer, blood pressure, heart rate, inside leg measurement & so on - Slow Jo 17.

1633967901450.png
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
33,677
Reaction score
44,201
Points
314
Location
East of Suez
Not had a watch since childhood.

It's no phobia, but I prefer to be unencumbered--the only thing I wear on my body are clothes, even sunglasses irk me when I need to wear them.

I have actually been given a watch as a gift since I made this post.

It's no frills, weighs practically nothing and is water resistant.

I like it, but I still seldom wear it for the reasons above.

Screenshot 2021-10-12 at 1.09.44 AM.png
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
9,167
Reaction score
20,850
Points
334
The twin of this, save that mine has the date and day:

3078.71.jpg


It’s a phony diver’s-style watch; the bezel is immovable.

£29.99 reduced from £60 two years ago. Suits me to a “T”, as it’s fake and cheap.

l lust after one of these, and may allow myself to be indulged for Christmas:

WW194027BRACE_01_f0b3815c-d31d-4243-8d9f-446ac9373bab_769x@2x.progressive.jpg


Marathon MSAR quartz with tritium lume.

maximus otter
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
31,845
Reaction score
50,819
Points
289
Th
The twin of this, save that mine has the date and day:

3078.71.jpg


It’s a phony diver’s-style watch; the bezel is immovable.

£29.99 reduced from £60 two years ago. Suits me to a “T”, as it’s fake and cheap.

l lust after one of these, and may allow myself to be indulged for Christmas:

WW194027BRACE_01_f0b3815c-d31d-4243-8d9f-446ac9373bab_769x@2x.progressive.jpg


Marathon MSAR quartz with tritium lume.

maximus otter
That top one looks a bit like a Rolex.
 

Cochise

Priest of the cult of the Dog with the Broken Paw
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
7,241
Reaction score
11,077
Points
299
The twin of this, save that mine has the date and day:

3078.71.jpg


It’s a phony diver’s-style watch; the bezel is immovable.

£29.99 reduced from £60 two years ago. Suits me to a “T”, as it’s fake and cheap.

l lust after one of these, and may allow myself to be indulged for Christmas:

WW194027BRACE_01_f0b3815c-d31d-4243-8d9f-446ac9373bab_769x@2x.progressive.jpg


Marathon MSAR quartz with tritium lume.

maximus otter
The Sekonda is very similar to mine, except mine has a blue face and silver bezel.
 

Lord Lucan

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Feb 17, 2017
Messages
3,764
Reaction score
10,869
Points
209
The twin of this, save that mine has the date and day:

3078.71.jpg


It’s a phony diver’s-style watch; the bezel is immovable.

£29.99 reduced from £60 two years ago. Suits me to a “T”, as it’s fake and cheap.

l lust after one of these, and may allow myself to be indulged for Christmas:

WW194027BRACE_01_f0b3815c-d31d-4243-8d9f-446ac9373bab_769x@2x.progressive.jpg


Marathon MSAR quartz with tritium lume.

maximus otter

I like the look of this style of watch.
If you're in the market for Rolex/diver style watches that won't break the bank, take a look at these brands: Pagani, Cronos & San Martin (all Chinese but excellent build quality, reliable and reputable).
They all have official stores at Ali Express if you don't mind the wait time for postage.
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
9,167
Reaction score
20,850
Points
334
I like the look of this style of watch.
If you're in the market for Rolex/diver style watches that won't break the bank, take a look at these brands: Pagani, Cronos & San Martin (all Chinese but excellent build quality, reliable and reputable).
They all have official stores at Ali Express if you don't mind the wait time for postage.

lt’s the combo of aesthetics and trits that lures me towards Marathon. The trouble is finding a bricks & mortar outlet where l can try their three sizes on my not-particularly-burly wrists.

maximus otter
 

Ascalon

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Jul 3, 2009
Messages
524
Reaction score
1,284
Points
154
I’ve always liked watches, and when I was young, the most complicated, dazzling and blinkin’ pixel digitals, the better.

Then, I got a mechanical watch from Russia and learned about the Soviet military watch industry and began a fascination with tool watches – as in watches designed for a job, such as diving, pilots, motorsport, etc.

I was also a huge space fan, and as kid ran home a couple miles from school to see the first ever space shuttle launch on TV.

It was hardly surprising that when I learned of the Omega Speedmaster, the watch that made it to the moon, I was hooked. But among all these other things, my romantic heart loves a story of great endeavour, huge ambition and ultimate failure.

Omega knew the PR coup it had on its hands with the moon watch and began milking it early, however, being a forward thinking company too, bosses surmised that it could not live off it forever, and so set about creating a worthy successor.
800px-Vintage_Omega_Speedmaster_%22Pre-moon%22.jpg

(Image: Wikipedia)

Project Alaska resulted in a new bar for horology for the harsh environment of space, including an enclosure to allow it to be worn specifically on EVAs, with temperature isolation to preserve accuracy without losing the chronograph function.

Coupled with that, by the late 60s, Omega Speedmasters had been travelling with astronauts for several years and there was a wealth of feedback for the Omega designers and engineers.

The Speedmaster Professional Mark II had a smooth, tonneau case design that was resonant for the fashion of the time, with shrouded lugs, and a bezel that now sat under a mineral glass that was fitted deeper in the case to reduce snagging and inadvertent damage. The Mark II retained the same movement (861), dial and hands as the moon watch, along with all of the improvements.
omgea-speedmaster-mark-ii-145.014.jpg

(Image: OracleTime)

It was billed as the successor to the crown and marketing of the day proudly stated its “daddy went to the moon”.

The problem was, when the Mark II was released in 1969, NASA said it was too busy to dedicate the time to the rigorous testing needed to flight qualify the watch. It stuck with the old 145.022 moon watch.

Omega had spent millions on the Alaska project and the development of the Mark II, and this was a terrible blow.

To add insult to injury, the Mark III, considered the ugly step sibling, was used extensively by the Russian space programme.

The Mark II, designed for space and informed by the feedback of the entire US space programme, was left to be an early 70s relic.

It has been subsequently found that Spacelab engineer, Ed Gibson had one as a personal timepiece, and most likely wore it under his space suit, when he launched with colleague William Pogue whose name is now associated forever with the Seiko automatic chronograph he wore as a personal time piece. However, there is still an active hunt for documentary proof of the Mark II flight with Gibson.

The Mark II was made from 1969 to 1974, which brings it in the window, for me, for another watch phenomenon – the birth year watch.

I would love a moon watch, but simply could not afford one. However, the much overlooked Mark II can be had for reasonable money. For a big round birthday, I set myself a challenge and bought and sold, traded and acquired my way to a 1972 Mark II. To my mind, there is no point in wearing a birth year watch the looks like new. Hence, I searched for one until I found one that was original enough, but showed its age with unique patination.
tPFHYD.jpg


My Omega Speedmaster Professional Mark II is a nexus of achievement in science and engineering, pioneering human spirit, epic failure and tragic obscurity, while also being a marker for me of my advancing years.

I fecking love it.
 

Amergin

Foundation and Umpire
Joined
Aug 13, 2020
Messages
162
Reaction score
481
Points
69
I have a couple of these - a Seiko Chronograph SND57P1: one for work, one for smart. A nice, robust watch, with a relatively straightforward design.

View attachment 20461

For those not familiar with them, I'd recommend the NATO style strap - especially for work watches, or ones worn doing sports and that sort of thing. Most of the issues I've had with watches in the past have started with a spring bar failing, and the watch falling onto the floor as a consequence. NATO style straps are one continuous strip that thread behind the bar, rather than attach to it - this takes some of the strain off the bars and means that even if one does fail the watch will still be attached to the strap by the other, and will not fall off your wrist. They are also cheap as chips, and I've never had one fail. (ZULU straps are similar, but are of thicker material, and can be a bit more problematic to fit.)


View attachment 20462
Mine is a variation on that, with a sort of 1920s straw boater / deckchair spin!
 

Attachments

  • 8BA1A9F4-6AD3-4B41-9B35-EBC399471642.jpeg
    8BA1A9F4-6AD3-4B41-9B35-EBC399471642.jpeg
    858.3 KB · Views: 4

Kondoru

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Messages
8,245
Reaction score
3,682
Points
239
Like Swifty, the man of taste, I have had a series of Casio F-91Ws since a teen, -must be 30 years now.

Always regarded them as cheap, but not shoddy, and would like a military...

...but the military love Casio F-91Ws...
 

Tempest63

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Dec 19, 2009
Messages
2,087
Reaction score
5,228
Points
224
I’ve always liked watches, and when I was young, the most complicated, dazzling and blinkin’ pixel digitals, the better.

Then, I got a mechanical watch from Russia and learned about the Soviet military watch industry and began a fascination with tool watches – as in watches designed for a job, such as diving, pilots, motorsport, etc.

I was also a huge space fan, and as kid ran home a couple miles from school to see the first ever space shuttle launch on TV.

It was hardly surprising that when I learned of the Omega Speedmaster, the watch that made it to the moon, I was hooked. But among all these other things, my romantic heart loves a story of great endeavour, huge ambition and ultimate failure.

Omega knew the PR coup it had on its hands with the moon watch and began milking it early, however, being a forward thinking company too, bosses surmised that it could not live off it forever, and so set about creating a worthy successor.
800px-Vintage_Omega_Speedmaster_%22Pre-moon%22.jpg

(Image: Wikipedia)

Project Alaska resulted in a new bar for horology for the harsh environment of space, including an enclosure to allow it to be worn specifically on EVAs, with temperature isolation to preserve accuracy without losing the chronograph function.

Coupled with that, by the late 60s, Omega Speedmasters had been travelling with astronauts for several years and there was a wealth of feedback for the Omega designers and engineers.

The Speedmaster Professional Mark II had a smooth, tonneau case design that was resonant for the fashion of the time, with shrouded lugs, and a bezel that now sat under a mineral glass that was fitted deeper in the case to reduce snagging and inadvertent damage. The Mark II retained the same movement (861), dial and hands as the moon watch, along with all of the improvements.
omgea-speedmaster-mark-ii-145.014.jpg

(Image: OracleTime)

It was billed as the successor to the crown and marketing of the day proudly stated its “daddy went to the moon”.

The problem was, when the Mark II was released in 1969, NASA said it was too busy to dedicate the time to the rigorous testing needed to flight qualify the watch. It stuck with the old 145.022 moon watch.

Omega had spent millions on the Alaska project and the development of the Mark II, and this was a terrible blow.

To add insult to injury, the Mark III, considered the ugly step sibling, was used extensively by the Russian space programme.

The Mark II, designed for space and informed by the feedback of the entire US space programme, was left to be an early 70s relic.

It has been subsequently found that Spacelab engineer, Ed Gibson had one as a personal timepiece, and most likely wore it under his space suit, when he launched with colleague William Pogue whose name is now associated forever with the Seiko automatic chronograph he wore as a personal time piece. However, there is still an active hunt for documentary proof of the Mark II flight with Gibson.

The Mark II was made from 1969 to 1974, which brings it in the window, for me, for another watch phenomenon – the birth year watch.

I would love a moon watch, but simply could not afford one. However, the much overlooked Mark II can be had for reasonable money. For a big round birthday, I set myself a challenge and bought and sold, traded and acquired my way to a 1972 Mark II. To my mind, there is no point in wearing a birth year watch the looks like new. Hence, I searched for one until I found one that was original enough, but showed its age with unique patination.
tPFHYD.jpg


My Omega Speedmaster Professional Mark II is a nexus of achievement in science and engineering, pioneering human spirit, epic failure and tragic obscurity, while also being a marker for me of my advancing years.

I fecking love it.
I bought my seamaster about 20 years ago. I had just had a payoff (of sorts) during my separation from the the first Mrs T63 and a jeweller friend from Hatton Garden wanted to shift some old stock. If I recall correctly the list price was about £1100 and he offered me this for £700.
Over the years it has been serviced at Hatton Garden via the same jeweller for a sum much lower than that charged by the high street jewellers but 18 months ago it needed a full service and overhaul which ran into a pretty penny. I love it…it is probably still my biggest extravagance But I bought it when at a low ebb with a few quid to spare.
image.jpg
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
31,845
Reaction score
50,819
Points
289
Like Swifty, the man of taste, I have had a series of Casio F-91Ws since a teen, -must be 30 years now.

Always regarded them as cheap, but not shoddy, and would like a military...

...but the military love Casio F-91Ws...
I currently wear this Casio W - 96 H ... I've run entire work departments using this watch, a pen and a notepad. I also use this to time all meals I cook at home as well as at work. I don't have to reach into my pocket for a phone to tell the time and date, this is quicker. I also can't be doing with tablets and their habit of spinning the screen round for no good reason.
acasiow-96h-1aves.jpg


I also own a white Casio F - 91 W which I use mostly only as a back up alarm clock. It's a good watch though. I once lost a F-91 W at the start of a holiday while canoeing in the 80's .. it had sunk to the bottom of a small lake. Someone diving found it two weeks later, returned it to me and it was still working fine and keeping the correct time. They're sturdy.
 
Last edited:

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
31,845
Reaction score
50,819
Points
289
Like Swifty, the man of taste, I have had a series of Casio F-91Ws since a teen, -must be 30 years now.

Always regarded them as cheap, but not shoddy, and would like a military...

...but the military love Casio F-91Ws...
By coincidence, someone over at B3ta has just posted a link to someone who modifies F-91Ws ..

https://n-o-d-e.net/watch_mods.html

He's modified this F-91Ws to include a micro SD memory card socket and a tap and pay chip ..

https://n-o-d-e.net/datarunner.html
 
Top