Farmers

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#1
Farmers are much misunderstood and maligned in urban discourse so I think that its time for a Farmers thread. Here you will find stories about farmers adventures both mundane and Mondo, quotidian and queer.

I'll start off with three stories from The Irish Examiners Quirky World column.

USA: Farmers may soon have a new weapon in their battle against crop-destroying wild boars — bacon.

Sodium nitrite, which is a preservative used to cure bacon, is being tested by scientists at the Department of Agriculture to see whether it could be used as a poison to deter the hogs, which cost the US about $1.5bn (€1.10bn) a year, including $800m in farm damage.
ENGLAND: Neighbours of a farm site had to live with the loud crowing and calling from three cockerels and numerous ducks for a 20-month period despite the landowner being served with two noise abatement orders, a court has heard.

Helen Rogers, 57, is accused of three offences of failing to comply with a noise abatement order served on St Peter’s Farm in Church Lane, Hambledon, Hampshire, by Winchester City Council.

David Ingram, head of environmental health at the council, said noise monitoring was carried out at the site following complaints received from neighbours to the farm.
ENGLAND: A tractor has been seized by police after drivers spotted it being driven along one of the country’s busiest motorways-

The Central Motorway Police Group said the bright red tractor was spotted travelling at “low speed” on the southbound carriageway of the M6 near Birmingham in the West Midlands at about 5.25am. Tractors are banned from using the motorway.

Police said they “received a few calls” about the tractor as it was driven between spaghetti junction in Birmingham and junction 5, with concerned motorists “shocked and worried that the slow nature of the tractor could create a hazard”.

Inspector Mark Watkins said the male driver was unaware he was breaking the law and was found to be uninsured
.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/world/quir ... 73084.html
 
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#2
could there be more to this than meets the eye? Perhaps those in the know have advance warning of a Vampire plague.

Plant more garlic, farmers urged

MANILA, Philippines–The government and private sector are scrambling to encourage more farmers to grow garlic as the price of the commodity has spiked in what they described as an “artificial shortage.”

The umbrella group Samahang Industriya ng Agrikultura (Sinag) has earmarked P25 million for lending to farmers who agree to cultivate the relatively capital-intensive crop.

Sinag president Rosendo So said in an interview the group intended to engage for contract growing between 500 hectares and 1,000 hectares of farmland.

“We are working to tap farmers in Nueva Ecija, Tarlac, Pangasinan and La Union,” said So. ...

Read more: http://business.inquirer.net/173553/pla ... z35eckdpWL
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook
 
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#3
SCARECROW BID

ENGLAND: A farm is aiming to break the Guinness Book of Records for the world’s largest display of scarecrows.

The record of 3,311 scarecrows is currently held by Cincinnati Horticulture Society but the National Forest Adventure Farm in Staffordshire is bidding to steal their crown.

More than 1,000 scarecrows have already been brought along to the farm in Burton-on-Trent. Visitors can also make one during their visit to the farm and are being urged to take selfies with their creations to post online to publicise the bid further.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/world/quir ... 77455.html
 

rynner2

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#4
#BBCtrending: Poles #EatApples to annoy Putin
By BBC Trending
What's popular and why

An apple a day keeps the doctor away. And over the past day there's been a surge of people eating apples in Poland - but not for medical reasons. Poles have been posting images of apples on social media of as a way of protesting against Russia.

On Wednesday, Russia announced a ban on some fruit and vegetable imports - including apples - from Poland "for sanitary reasons". Polish food producers say the ban is politically motivated as a response to EU sanctions, a claim Russia denies. In response, Poles have been showing their support for local farmers by campaigning on social media. It started on Twitter when the journalist Grzegorz Nawacki shared an image of himself eating an apple and used the hashtag #jedzjabka, which means "eat apples".

"It's the most hurtful thing that could happen to Polish farmers. Over half of apples produced in Poland annually are exported to Russia." says Nawacki. "I thought the best way to help them would be to start eating more apples and drinking more cider. That way some of the apples will get consumed and people will show solidarity with farmers."
The hashtags #jedzjabka and #EatApples began trending on Twitter and within hours the humble Polish apple had become an internet meme. A Facebook page called Eat Apples to Annoy Putin is gathering some of the most popular parody pictures and has so far been liked almost 17,000 times.

...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-28590589

:D
 

Frideswide

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#5
Excellent!

We're about to put a supermarket order in, will see if any of the apples are Polish!
 
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#6
I tend to buy locally grown fruit and veg whenever I can. Not out of patriotic zeal or love of Irish farmers: its an environmental question. Fuel is used to transport those goods.

I'm doubly annoyed when I see Israeli potatoes being sold in Ireland.
 

Frideswide

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#7
Yes, that's the usual decision we make. But on this occasion, in the same way as I boycotted South African produce in the old days, the one political choice outweighs the other political choice.
 

OneWingedBird

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#8
Sometimes the farmers strike back...

Two men from England have died following a crash involving a car and a tractor in Cullybackey, County Antrim.

It happened on Friday evening at about 20:15 BST on the Ballyconnelly Road.

The men, who were both aged 24, died after the Fiat Punto car they were travelling in collided with the tractor.

A 21-year-old man who was also in the car suffered head injuries that are not believed to be life-threatening.

The driver of the tractor was treated at the scene.

The Ballyconnelly Road has since reopened and police have appealed for information.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-28620154
 

Peripart

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#9
ENGLAND: A tractor has been seized by police after drivers spotted it being driven along one of the country’s busiest motorways-

Police said they “received a few calls” about the tractor as it was driven between spaghetti junction in Birmingham and junction 5, with concerned motorists “shocked and worried that the slow nature of the tractor could create a hazard”.
How else does the humble spaghetti farmer bring in the crop? There are fields of the stuff below that junction! Why else do you think it's called that?
 
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#10
Peripart said:
ENGLAND: A tractor has been seized by police after drivers spotted it being driven along one of the country’s busiest motorways-

Police said they “received a few calls” about the tractor as it was driven between spaghetti junction in Birmingham and junction 5, with concerned motorists “shocked and worried that the slow nature of the tractor could create a hazard”.
How else does the humble spaghetti farmer bring in the crop? There are fields of the stuff below that junction! Why else do you think it's called that?
They can fork off.
 
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#11
Another backward farmer.

Plenty of local backing for Eamonn’s tractor record bid

An All-Ireland-winning footballer will today aim to set a Guinness World Record for completing the longest journey reversing a tractor and trailer.

Eamonn Hickson, aged 27, plans to drive backwards from Dingle to Annascaul in Co Kerry, a distance of 17.5km.

“I think the event is unusual as no one has attempted a world record tractor and trailer reverse,” he said yesterday.

Eamonn, winner of All-Ireland under-21 and junior medals with Kerry, is taking on the challenge to raise publicity for an annual charity event, Annascaul Beerfest, which is raising money this weekend for the Kerry Cancer Support Group.

A digital media student at the Institute of Technology, Tralee, he reckons the attempt will take about three hours.

He got the idea while working on a farm in New Zealand in 2012, and applied to Guinness World Records (GWR) for an official record attempt.

A minimum distance of 15km has been set by GWR. The guidelines allow for multiple stops and breaks to enable traffic to pass. ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/pl ... 77941.html
 

Cochise

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#12
I'm a bit puzzled by the 'tractor on the motorway' story. There used to be a minimum speed limit of 30 mph on motorways, and large notices advising what traffic was prohibited. I can't recall seeing the minimum speed limit signs for ages, and the 'prohibition' signs are greatly simplified as well.

Modern tractors are capable of well over 30 mph, so I wonder what law he was breaking? Are tractors specifically banned like mopeds?
 

rynner2

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#13
ramonmercado said:
I tend to buy locally grown fruit and veg whenever I can. Not out of patriotic zeal or love of Irish farmers: its an environmental question. Fuel is used to transport those goods.
We used to have a Locavores thread pushing this idea. But in some cases it turned out that the local farmers had a bigger carbon footprint, because they needed things like specialist greenhouses and heating, which farmers in warmer climes didn't need.

Nothing's ever simple! :(
 
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#14
rynner2 said:
ramonmercado said:
I tend to buy locally grown fruit and veg whenever I can. Not out of patriotic zeal or love of Irish farmers: its an environmental question. Fuel is used to transport those goods.
We used to have a Locavores thread pushing this idea. But in some cases it turned out that the local farmers had a bigger carbon footprint, because they needed things like specialist greenhouses and heating, which farmers in warmer climes didn't need.

Nothing's ever simple! :(
Maybe, but greenhouses aren't required for the root vegetables, apples, cabbages etc.
 
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#15
Kerry man sets Guinness World Record for longest tractor and trailer reverse

Kerry native Eamonn Hickson has set the Guinness World Record for ’Longest journey reversing a tractor and trailer’.

On Saturday, the All-Ireland-Winning footballer successfully completed his challenge, reversing from Dingle to Anascaul, a total of 17.5km.

The event was a part of Anascaul Beerfest, an annual charity fundraiser, with proceeds going toward Kerry Cancer Support.

Eamonn said the idea came to him when working on a farm in New Zealand. While no one had ever attempted this record before, Guinness World Records set a minimum distance of 15km.

Despite heavy traffic due to the bank holiday weekend, Eamonn said it wasn't a problem, the Gardaí were "well in control". ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/ke ... 78106.html
 
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#16
Farmers dodging debts ‘should face new penalties’

Farmers dodging debts owed to the State should face new penalties, including debits from their earnings, seizures of their assets and higher interest rates on monies owed, according to a report.

The Government is considering setting up a central collection agency which could recoup over €200m owed across several public sectors, using radical, new penalties to force debtors to pay up.

Sweeping powers would be granted to the new agency, including denying businesses operating licences and landing hospital patients with hefty, late-payment fees.

The debt management review for Public Expenditure Minister Brendan Howlin warns that the Department of Agriculture is slow in taking action against farmers overpaid by the State.

It says the department does not take action untila debt is approaching the statute of limitations period, where it is four years outstanding. Retiring farmers also dodge debts they owe by transferring herd numbers and properties to others, leaving them with no assets to chase, the review explains.

Overpayments for farmers can occur when they over-declare land for payments, such as the rural environment protection and single farm payment schemes.

New sanctions should be applied to farmers owing money through debits from earnings, banks and assets, while interest rates above 3% could be applied to outstanding amounts, it is recommended. This could result in an extra €700,000 in extra funds or more a year, it adds. ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/fa ... 78813.html
 
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#17
Difficult to get money from farmers.

Receiver appointed over funds due to farmer with €97k bank debt

The court heard Mr Ruttle continued to farm and would continue to receive various payments and subsidies from the minister

The High Court has appointed a Receiver over Government and EU funds that may be due to a Co Limerick farmer who owes a bank just over €97,000.

Ms Justice Mary Irvine appointed Declan Ryan, of ACC Loan Management Ltd., Charlemont Place, Dublin, as Receiver over subsidies payable to Edward M.H. Ruttle, Ballingrane, Askeaton, Co Limerick.

Barrister Karl Sweeney told Judge Irvine that ACC Loan Management, the former ACC bank, had last year obtained a judgment against Mr Ruttle for €94,450 and so far nothing had been paid off it. He said the debt had since risen to €97,522.97.

Mr Sweeney said Mr Ruttle was a farmer and would be entitled to various payments and subsidies from the Minister of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries.

He told the court they included contributions from the EU Single Payment Scheme; the Rural Env ironment Protection Scheme, the Early Retirement Scheme and Farm Improvement Scheme; the Young Farmers’ Installation Aid and Compensatory Allowances in Less Favoured Areas. ...

- See more at: http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/co ... KABMS.dpuf
 
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#18
Soon, when crossing a field you will hear a voice from the air: Get Off My Land!

Drone test flights start in NY for agricultural research: FAA
Thursday, August 7, 2014 REUTERS

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The fifth of six U.S. test sites chosen to perform research on unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), or drones, has started operations in Rome, New York, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said on Thursday.

The main focus of the New York site will be on evaluating methods for scouting agricultural fields using different types of sensors, research that is expected to enhance current ways of monitoring crops.

Flights will be conducted by Canada’s PrecisionHawk Lancaster Platform drone, a tiny aircraft which weighs about three pounds and has a wingspan of four feet, the FAA said.


Read more at http://newsdaily.com/2014/08/07/drone-t ... cJ4vAku.99
 
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#19
More images at link.

This Is What a Farmer Looks Like
FarmHer documents the badass women who grow our food.
—By Kiera Butler | Sat Aug. 30, 2014 6:00 AM EDT

During the 2013 Super Bowl, Marjorie Gayle Alaniz was captivated by a commercial for Dodge Ram trucks that featured portraits of American farmers. She couldn't help but notice, however, that among the many farmers shown, there were only a handful of women. Alaniz, who comes from a family of Iowa farmers, was disappointed. "I wondered, how has this happened, that images of farms don't include women, when practically every farm has a woman working on it?" Indeed, according to the latest USDA Census of Agriculture, 46 percent of American farm operators are women.

Shortly after her Super Bowl revelation, Alaniz quit her job at a crop insurance company and started documenting women farmers in Central Iowa. The result is FarmHer, an online collection of photographs of some 40 lady farmers and counting. "The feedback has been fabulous," says Alaniz. "It's usually coming from women who grew up around agriculture or are currently involved in ag. They say, 'Thank you for showing the rest of the world that we are out here doing this, too.'"

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/ ... rs-farmher
 
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#20
The Irish Farmer Calendar is back! The popular calendar featuring beefy farmers posing topless for charity is hot off the presses for 2015 and ready to adorn your wall.

Since 2010, young farmers have stripped off their shirts for Bóthar, a charity that gives poverty stricken families in third world countries the living gift of a farm animal.

Once christened “agri porn” by Irish TV presenter Ryan Tubridy, the calendar shows the farmers in their natural habitat posing with livestock, working with tractors, and in the field. All images were taken by photographer Fran Marshall.

Here's a sneak preview: ...

http://www.irishcentral.com/culture/cra ... -year.html
 
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#23
French vegetable farmers protesting against falling living standards have set fire to tax and insurance offices in town of Morlaix, in Brittany. The farmers used tractors and trailers to dump artichokes, cauliflowers and manure in the streets and also smashed windows, police said.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls condemned protesters for preventing firefighters from dealing with the blaze.

The farmers say they cannot cope with falling prices for their products. A Russian embargo on some Western goods - imposed over the Ukraine crisis - has blocked off one of their main export markets. ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-29294096
 
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#25
Rural isolation has its effects.

President expresses concern about suicide among farming community
Survey found more than half of all farmers have been directly affected by suicide

President Michael D Higgins has expressed concern at a survey which found that more than half of all farmers have been directly affected by suicide in their immediate family or community.

Mr Higgins said he “could not but be concerned” at the findings published yesterday in an ICMSA/Irish Examiner survey.

“The suicide rate, for example, where one in five of those between 35 and 44 had a near, immediate experience in their families or in their extended families,” he said.
“Or that over half of farming families are some way or other affected by the impact of suicide in their communities. These are issues that are issues of not just my concern, but must be the issues of all of us.” ...

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/ ... -1.1939235
 
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#26
One law for farmers, another for the unemployed.

Proof of income to be sought for Farm Assist

Claimants of a €99m welfare scheme for low-income farmers are under no obligation to provide annual proof that they have an ongoing entitlement to payment from the fund.

The C&AG report has recommended that the Department of Social Protection should seek supporting documentation from farmers who are claiming from the Farm Assist Scheme. The report has found that €2.9m in overpayments were made last year in 377 cases. Five farmers accounted for 20%, or €580,000, of the total overpaid.

Farm Assist gives a standard personal rate of payment of €188 a week, and those with dependant adults and children receive increased payments.

The C&AG report has found that while farmers claiming the payments are required to make an annual declaration of on-going entitlement, and are obliged to inform the Department of any changes in their means, they are not asked for supporting documentation to prove their claim to the payment. ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/pr ... 88898.html
 
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#27
Farmers accused of having sex with animals after goat is born with human head

People in Argentina, became angry at a farmer and his family when they learned that a goat was born with a human head.

However, the farmer said that she buried the goat because the family feared it would bring them bad luck. Olga Villalba said that the goat was already dead when it was born, and she blamed pesticides for it being born with a human head. ...

http://www.worldwideweirdnews.com/2014/ ... 34618.html
 
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#28
WALES: An arts company has said sorry after a 100ft poem on Welsh mountain range, Snowdonia accidentally ended up looking likegraffiti.

Verses penned by national poet Gillian Clarke were written in clay pigment on Gladstone Rock as part of an arts project celebrating the region’s sheep farmers.

But the words, which were supposed to wash off in the rain, ended up being “baked” on to the rockface following a hot and dry September.

Bosses of the National Mountain Centre in Snowdonia hoped the poem would not cause permanent damage, and National Theatre of Wales has promised to puts things back the way they were.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/world/quir ... 90481.html
 
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#29
Seven pesticides, including some that are very common, are triggering clinical depression among US farmers, a 20-year study released by the US National Institutes of Health has indicated.

The study by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that farmers who used organochlorines - one of two categories of the seven pesticides - to eradicate insects, weeds, and fungi were up to 90 percent more likely to have been diagnosed with depression. Farmers who employed widely-used fumigants, the other category, were up to 80 percent more likely to suffer from depression. The study was first published last month.

To investigate any connections between depression and pesticide use, the NIH researchers interviewed about 84,000 farmers and spouses of farmers beginning in the mid-1990s.

“There had been scattered reports in the literature that pesticides were associated with depression,” Dr. Freya Kamel, the lead researcher for the study, told Modern Farmer. “We wanted to do a new study because we had more detailed data than most people have access to.” ...

http://rt.com/usa/204543-pesticides-cli ... n-farmers/
 

Naughty_Felid

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#30
That's interesting, as it's well known how common it is for farmers to take their own lives. It would also be interesting to see the difference between diary farmers and arable farmers.
 
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